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Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the…
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Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don't… (2007)

by John Allen Paulos

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» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
It's me, over here in the choir robes. Nothing in this book I didn't already embrace, I mean. The geeky mathematical angle was a huge bonus. I found this audio book fun, funny and comforting. If you like this sort of thing, this is the sort of thing you like. And I do. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
Paulos makes some points I have not read elsewhere. And it was worth reading for those. But such points are few. The book is a bit light and I feel that others (such as Dawkins and Hitchens) have done a more thorough job addressing this subject. ( )
  tnilsson | Jan 25, 2013 |
Meh.

Using mathematical logical to argue against the belief in God(s). Treading old ground with a more rigorously logical approach. Could have been far better if it went further, but for the arguments presented, it does a good job. ( )
  fakelvis | Feb 3, 2012 |
Sounds like it should be better than it is. The arguments are sound, but somehow it just isn't compelling reading. ( )
  quantum_flapdoodle | Apr 19, 2011 |
Simple, quick, neat, elegant, stylish, readable, and comprehensive.

Takes the most common, popular and "strongest" arguments for a god and gives them a logical seeing to.

Thank god it's also full of humour. ( )
  psiloiordinary | Oct 20, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0809059193, Hardcover)

A Lifelong Unbeliever Finds No Reason to Change His Mind
 
Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Mathematician and bestselling author John Allen Paulos thinks not. In Irreligion he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into twelve chapters that refute the twelve arguments most often put forward for believing in God's existence. The latter arguments, Paulos relates in his characteristically lighthearted style, "range from what might be called golden oldies to those with a more contemporary beat. On the playlist are the firstcause argument, the argument from design, the ontological argument, arguments from faith and biblical codes, the argument from the anthropic principle, the moral universality argument, and others." Interspersed among his twelve counterarguments are remarks on a variety of irreligious themes, ranging from the nature of miracles and creationist probability to cognitive illusions and prudential wagers. Special attention is paid to topics, arguments, and questions that spring from his incredulity "not only about religion but also about others' credulity." Despite the strong influence of his day job, Paulos says, there isn't a single mathematical formula in the book.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:09 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Mathematician Paulos thinks not. Here he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into twelve chapters that refute the twelve arguments most often put forward for believing in God's existence. Interspersed among his twelve counterarguments are remarks on a variety of irreligious themes, ranging from the nature of miracles and creationist probability to cognitive illusions and prudential wagers. Special attention is paid to topics, arguments, and questions that spring from his incredulity "not only about religion but also about others' credulity." Despite the strong influence of his day job, Paulos says, there isn't a single mathematical formula in the book.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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