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Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance…
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Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation (2003)

by Lynne Truss

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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English (274)  Italian (2)  Dutch (1)  Hebrew (1)  Piratical (1)  All languages (279)
Showing 1-5 of 274 (next | show all)
Required reading for anyone who writes or has an affection for words and language. Funny too. ( )
  ndpmcIntosh | Mar 21, 2016 |
I bet it teaches you something! I thought I was pretty savvy on my punctuation, but I learned a few things from this. ( )
  thebookmagpie | Mar 13, 2016 |
I enjoyed reading about punctuation causing miscommunication, about the history of the various punctuation marks, and the rules for punctuation. My favourite sections was definitely at the beginning with the chapter on apostrophes. She writes well and there were many funny moments in the book. ( )
  MelAnnC | Feb 28, 2016 |
Man, I wish I picked this up two years ago when a few friends recommended it. Punctuation is my nemesis. I hate it, and it hates me back. Me and Commas, we just have a great time messing up a manuscript. This was as easy to read as a book about punctuation could possibly be, so kudos to the author for that. It's no small task to be able to teach about such a horrible subject and entertain the reader at the same time.

Will any of what I read stick? We'll see. I borrowed this from the library, but I'm going to buy a copy now that I've read it. A handy little book to have around while editing.
( )
  ReneeMiller | Feb 25, 2016 |
Every person who possesses an ounce of passion on any subject needs (1) friends who share similar passions and/or (2) a self-help book. Eats, Shoots & Leaves is my self-help book. Thank you, Lynne Truss, for reminding me that I'm not the only one who wants to start a murderous rampage when someone misuses an apostrophe. But most of all, thank you for encouraging—no, demanding—sticklers to unite. Language is a living, changing thing, but that doesn't mean it has to deteriorate back to the caveman days. ( )
  AngelClaw | Feb 8, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 274 (next | show all)
The first punctuation mistake in “Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation” (Gotham; $17.50), by Lynne Truss, a British writer, appears in the dedication, where a nonrestrictive clause is not preceded by a comma. It is a wild ride downhill from there.
 
When [Truss] stops straining at lawks-a-mussy chirpiness and analyzes punctuation malpractice, she is often persuasive
 
The passion and fun of her arguments are wonderfully clear. Here is someone with abiding faith in the idea that ''proper punctuation is both the sign and the cause of clear thinking.''
 
Lynne Truss's book is (stay with this sentence, and remember the function of punctuation is to 'tango the reader into the pauses, inflections, continuities and connections that the spoken word would convey') as much an argument for clear thinking as it is a pedantic defence of obsolete conventions of written language.
added by mikeg2 | editThe Guardian, Nigel Williams (Nov 9, 2003)
 

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Truss, Lynneprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Byrnes, PatIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McCourt, FrankForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nunn, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To the memory of the striking Bolshevik printers of St Petersburg who, in 1905, demanded to be paid the same rate for punctuation marks as for letters, and thereby directly precipitated the first Russian Revolution
First words
Either this will ring bells for you, or it won't.
Quotations
On the page, punctuation performs its grammatical function, but in the mind of the reader it does more than that. It tells the reader how to hum the tune.
But I can't help feeling that our punctuation system, which has served the written word with grace and ingenuity for centuries, must not be allowed to disappear without a fight.
A panda walks into a cafe.

He orders a sandwich, eats it, then draws a gun and fires two shots in the air.
"Why?" asks the confused waiter, as the panda makes towards the exit. The panda produces a badly punctuated wildlife manual and tosses it over his shoulder.
"I'm a panda," he says at the door. "Look it up."
The waiter turns to the relevant entry and, sure enough, finds an explanation.
"Panda. Large black-and-white bear-like mammal, native to China. Eats, shoots and leaves."
Last words
Disambiguation notice
This is not the same work as:

1.  "Eats, Shoots and Leaves: Why, Commas Do Make a Difference!", which is the children's version of the book;

2. the various calendars inspired by this book;

3. "Eats, Shoots and Leaves: Cutting a Dash", which is a recording of a radio show associated with the book.
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Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Book description
We all know the basics of punctuation. Or do we? A look at most neighborhood signage tells a different story. Through sloppy usage and low standards on the internet, in email, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty, and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From the invention of the question mark in the time of Charlemagne to George Orwell shunning the semicolon, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0142800821, Audio CD)

In 2002 Lynne Truss presented Cutting a Dash, a well-received BBC Radio 4 series about punctuation, which led to the writing of Eats, Shoots & Leaves. The book became a runaway success in the UK, hitting number one on the bestseller lists and prompting extraordinary headlines such as Grammar Book Tops Bestseller List (BBC News). With more than 500,000 copies of her book in print in her native England, Lynne Truss is ready to rally the troops on this side of the pond with her rousing cry, Sticklers unite!

Through sloppy usage and low standards on the Internet, in e-mail, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. If there are only pedants left who care, then so be it. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From George Orwell shunning the semicolon, to New Yorker editor Harold Ross's epic arguments with James Thurber over commas, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:05:19 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Looks at the history of punctuation and the rules governing the use of apostrophes, commas, dashes, hyphens, colons, and semicolons.

» see all 7 descriptions

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