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Eats shoots and leaves: The Zero Tolerance…
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Eats shoots and leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation (original 2003; edition 2003)

by Lynne Truss

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11,523255233 (3.81)207
Member:rightantler
Title:Eats shoots and leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation
Authors:Lynne Truss
Info:Profile Books (2003), Edition: 1st Edition, Hardcover, 209 pages
Collections:Read but unowned, Stewart's Read
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Tags:Y04, culture

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Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss (Author) (2003)

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» See also 207 mentions

English (250)  Italian (2)  Dutch (1)  Hebrew (1)  Piratical (1)  All languages (255)
Showing 1-5 of 250 (next | show all)
I bet it teaches you something! I thought I was pretty savvy on my punctuation, but I learned a few things from this. ( )
  humblewomble | Oct 19, 2014 |
Okay, Lynne Truss is a language fascist. But I like her neurosis. The language is on its way to becoming the world's language, but as with Latin it will devide into two main strains, the literary language, which preserves a number of the beautiful nuances that made English a wonderfully flexible tool for the expression of thought, and a demotic form whiich will share some elements of English's wonderfully flexible grammar with a diverging vocabulary. I'll be sorry for the growth of the demotic, loving to use the word "Fewer" to indicate nouns that have a different form when plural, rather than the demotic "less" for any plurality. Yes I even use words like plurality in its correct sense!
So hang in there, Lynne, keep punctuating above your weight! Forever! ( )
  DinadansFriend | Jun 9, 2014 |
This tome deserves high praise indeed. Lynne truss is excellent and knows her stuff so well that you will feel like a small student at a master's knee. She diligently argues that punctuation should not be placed aside and forgotten. That it makes your words come alive with vibrancy.

And her prose is such that you sit up and pay attention. It is not light reading for an afternoon's hour, but deserves to be given your focus so that you too will take on a little of her zeal in the fight to save the tools that make our words sing!

Citing many writers and providing examples Truss shows us and reminds us that there is craft to writing, and to using punctuation to elevate your thoughts to better than they are. To make your writing able to be admired for the way you craft it beyond what you say with them.

And that the art of this is falling away in our digital text/chat driven society. That we should remember that we who do write are guardians, placed with a sacred trust that when we write and attract many eyes to our tales, it gives us the chance to preach and proselytize to the masses who have become lazy with language.

If you are no longer a novice in the art of writing, or do care about what your words should do and be, then this is a book you must add to your library. Not just read it, but buy it, keep it, and place it in a place of reverence. ( )
2 vote DWWilkin | Mar 16, 2014 |
This was fun and entertaining and was a great help in repairing the damage my poetry degree did to my grammar. *g*

The only thing I really took issue with was her claim that people were no longer using commas before quoted dialogue. Maybe that's specific to British newspapers? I don't know. I just remember saying, "wait, what?" when I got to that part.

My edition came with punctuation to vandalize incorrectly punctuated public sign with, and that just makes me laugh and laugh. ( )
  sageness | Feb 7, 2014 |
Lynne Truss makes reading about punctuation fun! ( )
  jamesfallen | Feb 7, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 250 (next | show all)
The first punctuation mistake in “Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation” (Gotham; $17.50), by Lynne Truss, a British writer, appears in the dedication, where a nonrestrictive clause is not preceded by a comma. It is a wild ride downhill from there.
 
When [Truss] stops straining at lawks-a-mussy chirpiness and analyzes punctuation malpractice, she is often persuasive
 
The passion and fun of her arguments are wonderfully clear. Here is someone with abiding faith in the idea that ''proper punctuation is both the sign and the cause of clear thinking.''
 
Lynne Truss's book is (stay with this sentence, and remember the function of punctuation is to 'tango the reader into the pauses, inflections, continuities and connections that the spoken word would convey') as much an argument for clear thinking as it is a pedantic defence of obsolete conventions of written language.
added by mikeg2 | editThe Guardian, Nigel Williams (Nov 9, 2003)
 

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Truss, LynneAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Byrnes, PatIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To the memory of the striking Bolshevik printers of St Petersburg who, in 1905, demanded to be paid the same rate for punctuation marks as for letters, and thereby directly precipitated the first Russian Revolution
First words
Either this will ring bells for you, or it won't.
Quotations
On the page, punctuation performs its grammatical function, but in the mind of the reader it does more than that. It tells the reader how to hum the tune.
But I can't help feeling that our punctuation system, which has served the written word with grace and ingenuity for centuries, must not be allowed to disappear without a fight.
A panda walks into a cafe.

He orders a sandwich, eats it, then draws a gun and fires two shots in the air.
"Why?" asks the confused waiter, as the panda makes towards the exit. The panda produces a badly punctuated wildlife manual and tosses it over his shoulder.
"I'm a panda," he says at the door. "Look it up."
The waiter turns to the relevant entry and, sure enough, finds an explanation.
"Panda. Large black-and-white bear-like mammal, native to China. Eats, shoots and leaves."
Last words
Disambiguation notice
This is not the same work as:

1.  "Eats, Shoots and Leaves: Why, Commas Do Make a Difference!", which is the children's version of the book;

2. the various calendars inspired by this book;

3. "Eats, Shoots and Leaves: Cutting a Dash", which is a recording of a radio show associated with the book.
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Book description
We all know the basics of punctuation. Or do we? A look at most neighborhood signage tells a different story. Through sloppy usage and low standards on the internet, in email, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty, and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From the invention of the question mark in the time of Charlemagne to George Orwell shunning the semicolon, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0142800821, Audio CD)

In 2002 Lynne Truss presented Cutting a Dash, a well-received BBC Radio 4 series about punctuation, which led to the writing of Eats, Shoots & Leaves. The book became a runaway success in the UK, hitting number one on the bestseller lists and prompting extraordinary headlines such as Grammar Book Tops Bestseller List (BBC News). With more than 500,000 copies of her book in print in her native England, Lynne Truss is ready to rally the troops on this side of the pond with her rousing cry, Sticklers unite!

Through sloppy usage and low standards on the Internet, in e-mail, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. If there are only pedants left who care, then so be it. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From George Orwell shunning the semicolon, to New Yorker editor Harold Ross's epic arguments with James Thurber over commas, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:23:34 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Looks at the history of punctuation and the rules governing the use of apostrophes, commas, dashes, hyphens, colons, and semicolons.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

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