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Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
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Fahrenheit 451 (original 1953; edition 1987)

by Ray Bradbury

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
30,29954427 (4.04)1 / 925
Member:Euryale
Title:Fahrenheit 451
Authors:Ray Bradbury
Info:Del Rey (1987), Reissue, Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:classic, dystopia, school, science fiction

Work details

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (1953)

1950s (1)
  1. 862
    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (readafew, Booksloth, RosyLibrarian, moietmoi, haraldo)
    readafew: Both books are about keeping the people in control and ignorant.
  2. 632
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (phoenix7g, meggyweg, Babou_wk, haraldo)
    Babou_wk: Contre-utopie, société future où l'unique but de la vie est le bonheur. Toute pratique requérant de la réflexion est bannie.
  3. 294
    The Giver by Lois Lowry (thekoolaidmom)
  4. 211
    Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut (Smiler69)
  5. 222
    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (ateolf)
  6. 202
    The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury (jpers36, moietmoi)
  7. 172
    Match to Flame: The Fictional Paths to Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (grizzly.anderson)
    grizzly.anderson: A great study of how Bradbury came to write Fahrenheit 451 as a progress through his own short stories, letters and drafts. A similar collection of stories but without some of the other material is also available as "A Pleasure To Burn"
  8. 153
    A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller, Jr. (goodiegoodie, kristenn)
  9. 104
    Something Wicked this Way Comes by Ray Bradbury (sturlington)
  10. 72
    The October Country by Ray Bradbury (Booksloth)
  11. 62
    The Medium is the Massage by Marshall McLuhan (bertilak)
  12. 1410
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (SandSing7)
  13. 62
    A Gift upon the Shore by M. K. Wren (lquilter)
    lquilter: "A Gift Upon the Shore" is a post-apocalyptic world; some people seek to preserve books and knowledge, but they are seen as a danger to others. Beautifully written.
  14. 85
    Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood (andja)
  15. 96
    Planet of the Apes by Pierre Boulle (allenmichie)
  16. 30
    Too loud a solitude by Bohumil Hrabal (edwinbcn)
  17. 63
    A Universal History of the Destruction of Books: From Ancient Sumer to Modern-day Iraq by Fernando Báez (bertilak)
  18. 53
    Feed by M. T. Anderson (jlynno84)
  19. 32
    The World of Null-A by A. E. Van Vogt (jeroenvandorp)
  20. 12
    Year of Consent by Kendell Foster Crossen (Sylak)

(see all 25 recommendations)

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English (502)  Italian (10)  Spanish (9)  Finnish (5)  French (4)  German (4)  Catalan (2)  Swedish (2)  Vietnamese (1)  Dutch (1)  Hebrew (1)  Greek (1)  All languages (542)
Showing 1-5 of 502 (next | show all)
a great classic... should be a MUST read for all ( )
1 vote SpiritedTruthSeeker | Aug 5, 2014 |
This is long overdue. It is a great book to read. The whole premise of thinking of thoughts that have meaning, that could linger, that could continue into dialogue and conversations, is link to the availability of books, the interest we put into books, and how books help and train us into thinking longer than "Like".

The age of Facebook, and WhatApp have made me worry a bit about how to carry a conversation with something deeper than model wearing golden bikinis.



(spoiler show)
How could that happen?

Well, it is happening? It is worrying when people stop reading. People start commenting that "Inception", the movie, is too complicated. (It is a movie, for crying out loud.)

I don't know how to go on without books. They are my friends, my companions for rainy days, and quiet nights.

I hope we will not stop reading.

What is worst than a world of people that don't read? It would be worst if people only read bullshit books, like religious bullshit, anti-science bullshit, the like.

As for burning books, I hope there would not be the day we, the books lovers, have to protect shitty books, like the really bad movie "The day after tomorrow". I would really hate that, to be obligation to protect really shitty books, like the Christian bible or Twilight. Yuck. ( )
  XOX | Jul 30, 2014 |
I had read this book years and years ago in a hotel in Salt Lake City, where the idea of burning all books, except one, of course, seemed unnervingly apt. Not long ago, I kind and generous LT member of the Folio Society Devotees got a defective version from the FS and offered her damaged copy to anyone, just for the asking, since the Society wasn't interested in getting it back. Well you're listening to the lucky winner. And what a wonderful edition! The problem with the copy is that, somehow, the pages had gotten wet and were somewhat stuck together; although with careful handling, they could be separated without consequence to the text or illustrations, other than a little unavoidable crinkling of the paper. How fitting is that? ( )
  jburlinson | Jul 26, 2014 |
In a future world where all homes are fireproof, what is left for firemen to do? Start fires and burn books. Books might lead to individualism. The state desires conformity and uses mass media to that end. A constant stream of mass media makes it difficult to cultivate an inner life. When fireman Guy Montag's unusual neighbor, 17-year-old Clarisse, opens his eyes to the world outside the influence of mass media, he begins to question his way of life. His questioning leads to a growing estrangement with his wife and ultimately endangers his life.

Some of the future that Ray Bradbury imagined in the 1950s has come to pass, like the wall-to-wall home entertainment system and electronic tracking mechanisms. However, in some ways technology has moved beyond what Bradbury imagined. The pendulum has swung back toward individualism with the proliferation of cable channels, the seemingly endless choices of streaming media on the Internet, and Google's personalized ads and search results. However, with giant corporations controlling large segments of data and the ability of governments to capture, manipulate, or block data, the pendulum may be swinging the other way again.

The audio version I listened to included an afterword by the author with his reflections on the differences between the book and his stage adaptation. He also points out the irony that a book about censorship has been edited to make it more acceptable for classroom use. ( )
  cbl_tn | Jul 17, 2014 |
In this dystopian society, set some time in the future, firemen burn books -- a contraband -- because they provoke thought and conversation of substance. Anyone, who has been reported to be in possession of books in their homes, will have their habitations razed to the ground. Read the story of one fireman who stumbles upon books, and how his views and world are subsequently changed. ( )
  MomsterBookworm | Jul 14, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 502 (next | show all)
Classique parmi les classiques, Fahrenheit 451 est à la SF ce que le Dracula de Stocker est au fantastique. Cette œuvre est une contre-utopie à la mesure du Meilleur des mondes de Huxley ou à 1984 de Orwell. C’est dire…
 
This intriguing idea might well serve as a foundation on which to build a worst of all possible worlds. And to a certain extent it does not seem implausible. Unfortunately, Bradbury goes little further than his basic hypothesis. The rest of the equation is jerry-built.
 
Ray Bradbury has more than ideas, and that is what sets him apart from most writers who try to be original. He is fantastic, and human. He never looks at anything with a jaded eye; he is a storyteller every minute of the time, and he is definitely his own kind of storyteller.
added by Shortride | editLos Angeles Times, Don Guzman (pay site) (Oct 25, 1953)
 

» Add other authors (23 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ray Bradburyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aguilar, Julia OsunaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Aldiss, Brian W.Forewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Škvorecký, JosefTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Buddingh', CeesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chambon, JacquesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crespo, AlfredoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Emmerová, JarmilaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Güttinger, FritzTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hoye, StephenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hurt, ChristopherNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kayalıoğlu, KorkutTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kayalıoğlu, ZerrinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keyser, GawieForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knipel, CidTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Monicelli, GiorgioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moorcock, MichaelIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mugnaini, Joseph A.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nordin, SivTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennington, BruceCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pepper, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prichard, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robillot, HenriTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stangl, KatrinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weber, SamIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"If they give you ruled paper,
write the other way."
Juan Ramón Jiménez
FAHRENHEIT 451:
the temperature at which
book-paper catches fire and burns
Dedication
This one, with gratitude,
is for
Don Congdon
First words
It was a pleasure to burn.
Quotations
It doesn't matter what you do, he said, so long as you change something from the way it was before you touched it into something that's like you after you take your hands away.
But that's the wonderful things about man; he never gets so discouraged or disgusted that he gives up doing it all over again, because he knows very well it is important and worth the doing.
But remember that the Captain belongs to the most dangerous enemy of truth and freedom, the solid unmoving cattle of the majority. Oh, God, the terrible tyranny of the majority.
I'm afraid of children my own age. they kill each other. Did it always use to be that way? My uncle says no. Six of my firends have been shot in the last year alone. Ten of them died in car wrecks. I'm afraid of them and they don't like me because I'm afraid. My uncle says his grandfather remembered when children didn't kill each other. But that was a long time ago when they had things different. They believed in responsibility, my uncle says. Do you know, I'm responsible. I was spanked when I needed it, years ago. And I do all the shopping and housecleaning by hand.
The same infinite detail and awareness could be projected through the radios and televisors, but are not. No, no, it's not books at all you're looking for! Take it where you can find it, in old phonograph records, old motion pictures, and in old friends; look for it in nature and look for it in yourself. Books were only one type of receptacle where we stored a lot of things we were afraid we might forget. There is nothing magical in them at all. The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us. Of course you couldn't know this, of course you still can't understand what I mean when I say all this.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
This is the original novel by Ray Bradbury, not the 1966 film directed by François Truffaut or any other adaptation.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
"The system was simple. Everyone understood it. Books were for burning... along with the houses in which they were hidden." Fahrenheit 451 is an enlightening story that is almost daunting. In a place where firemen build fires to burn books, this story is somewhat forboding because although it may seem extreme, it causes the reader to look at how much we take books and freedom for granted. Guy Montag goes outside the norm of a society where relationships are based on material things in order to try to discover how life would be if one were to actually think and live for themselves instead of being told what to do and how to behave. This book made me realize how much I should appreciate a good solid book and made me weary of what our world could come to in the future with the increase in technology and the disappearance in the amount of some books.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0345342968, Mass Market Paperback)

In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury's classic, frightening vision of the future, firemen don't put out fires--they start them in order to burn books. Bradbury's vividly painted society holds up the appearance of happiness as the highest goal--a place where trivial information is good, and knowledge and ideas are bad. Fire Captain Beatty explains it this way, "Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs.... Don't give them slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy."

Guy Montag is a book-burning fireman undergoing a crisis of faith. His wife spends all day with her television "family," imploring Montag to work harder so that they can afford a fourth TV wall. Their dull, empty life sharply contrasts with that of his next-door neighbor Clarisse, a young girl thrilled by the ideas in books, and more interested in what she can see in the world around her than in the mindless chatter of the tube. When Clarisse disappears mysteriously, Montag is moved to make some changes, and starts hiding books in his home. Eventually, his wife turns him in, and he must answer the call to burn his secret cache of books. After fleeing to avoid arrest, Montag winds up joining an outlaw band of scholars who keep the contents of books in their heads, waiting for the time society will once again need the wisdom of literature.

Bradbury--the author of more than 500 short stories, novels, plays, and poems, including The Martian Chronicles and The Illustrated Man--is the winner of many awards, including the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America. Readers ages 13 to 93 will be swept up in the harrowing suspense of Fahrenheit 451, and no doubt will join the hordes of Bradbury fans worldwide. --Neil Roseman

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:49:35 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

A totalitarian regime has ordered all books to be destroyed, but one of the book burners suddenly realizes their merit.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 26 descriptions

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