HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Loading...

Fahrenheit 451 (original 1953; edition 1987)

by Ray Bradbury

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
37,90073623 (4.03)1 / 1241
Member:DakotaHollenbeck
Title:Fahrenheit 451
Authors:Ray Bradbury
Info:Ballantine Books (1987), Mass Market Paperback, 179 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work details

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (Author) (1953)

  1. 912
    1984 by George Orwell (readafew, Booksloth, rosylibrarian, moietmoi, haraldo, BookshelfMonstrosity)
    readafew: Both books are about keeping the people in control and ignorant.
    BookshelfMonstrosity: A man's romance-inspired defiance of menacing, repressive governments in bleak futures are the themes of these compelling novels. Control of language and monitors that both broadcast to and spy on people are key motifs. Both are dramatic, haunting, and thought-provoking.… (more)
  2. 682
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (phoenix7g, meggyweg, Babou_wk, haraldo)
    Babou_wk: Contre-utopie, société future où l'unique but de la vie est le bonheur. Toute pratique requérant de la réflexion est bannie.
  3. 284
    The Giver by Lois Lowry (thekoolaidmom)
  4. 231
    Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut (Smiler69)
  5. 233
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (ateolf)
  6. 222
    The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury (jpers36, moietmoi)
  7. 172
    Match to Flame: The Fictional Paths to Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (grizzly.anderson)
    grizzly.anderson: A great study of how Bradbury came to write Fahrenheit 451 as a progress through his own short stories, letters and drafts. A similar collection of stories but without some of the other material is also available as "A Pleasure To Burn"
  8. 153
    A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr. (goodiegoodie, kristenn)
  9. 72
    The October Country by Ray Bradbury (Booksloth)
  10. 62
    A Gift Upon the Shore by M. K. Wren (lquilter)
    lquilter: "A Gift Upon the Shore" is a post-apocalyptic world; some people seek to preserve books and knowledge, but they are seen as a danger to others. Beautifully written.
  11. 40
    Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury (Morteana)
  12. 52
    The Medium is the Massage by Marshall McLuhan (bertilak)
  13. 30
    The Fireman: A Novel by Joe Hill (sturlington)
  14. 96
    Planet of the Apes by Pierre Boulle (allenmichie)
  15. 53
    Feed by M. T. Anderson (jlynno84)
  16. 20
    Too Loud A Solitude by Bohumil Hrabal (edwinbcn)
  17. 53
    A Universal History of the Destruction of Books: From Ancient Sumer to Modern-day Iraq by Fernando Báez (bertilak)
  18. 75
    Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood (andja)
  19. 10
    Shadowlife by Martin Grzimek (spiphany)
  20. 10
    The Acolyte by Craig Davidson (ShelfMonkey)

(see all 29 recommendations)

1950s (1)
Read (40)
Satire (150)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (670)  Spanish (20)  Italian (12)  Finnish (5)  German (5)  French (5)  Catalan (3)  Dutch (2)  Swedish (2)  Vietnamese (1)  Hebrew (1)  Portuguese (1)  Greek (1)  All languages (728)
Showing 1-5 of 670 (next | show all)
summary: In the future, books are seen as the enemy. Firefighters burn books, creating fires instead of putting fires out.
reflection: I loved this book in high school and I loved this book reading it again a second time. I think the ideas behind this book is really interesting and it made me worry about this happening someday in the future of the world. I think that it would be a crazy world without books and reading. Having technology control your life so much seems like it's happening in the world today so it kind of freaks me out!
  dempseydee | Sep 17, 2018 |
“‘Cram them full of noncombustible data, chock them so damned full of ‘facts’ they feel stuffed, but absolutely ‘brilliant’ with information. Then they’ll feel they’re thinking, they’ll get a sense of motion without moving. And they’ll be happy, because facts of that sort don’t change. Don’t give them any slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy.'”

In “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury

Teenagers don't need any special kind of reading program, since they are hugely curious about everything, at least i was interested in the extra-curricular forbidden literature (there was plenty at that time) and the hidden subjects, not out of a morbid fantasy -- but perhaps too, a literary imagination.

Bradbury was such a surprise. Some stories seemed full of compassion and solidarity --you'd call it now. We tend to look back on our teenage selves, and our teenage tastes in literature, with a certain amount of embarrassment. As though we should have been reading, then, the stuff we read now. But I think we're looking at it the wrong way. For the middle-aged to dismiss a book that has an enlightening effect on a teenage mind is as foolish as for a teenager to dismiss a book that has an enlightening effect on a middle-aged mind. We are not the same person all our lives. My brain is a different shape when you're a teenager. It needs a book that's that shape. Bradbury wrote that kind of book. A lot of science fiction writers do. Most adult literary novelists are incapable of writing that kind of book. That does not make either groups' books superior, just different, and hard to compare...

Isn't the judging of other forms of media as offensive exactly what Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451" was about? These days, of course, we can laugh at such monstrosities. Books can be seen to burn at 232 degrees centigrade. What imperialistic barbarians we used to be! The one thing I took from “Fahrenheit 451” was not so much that they were burning books, but that the society dismissed anything that didn't provide instant gratification or required thought. Burning books was the symptom of a sick society, arguably more prevalent now then when Ray wrote it. Given the trend for lithium ion batteries to spontaneously combust one wonders if an eBook version of Fahrenheit 451 will disappear in some Tinguely-esque self-parody? ( )
2 vote antao | Aug 28, 2018 |
I can't believe I never read this book. I also can't believe how amazing and poignant it is.

I can't decide what book I would be if I could be one. Which book would you be? ( )
  Mattmcmanus | Aug 23, 2018 |
Having read this makes me realize how startling close we are coming to this with our participation awards and 'snowflakes'. I wonder what Ray Bradbury would have thought of our current culture where everyone is so sensitive. ( )
  CharleyBethH | Aug 23, 2018 |
Excerpts from my original GR review (Sep 2009):
- Bradbury's writing doesn't impress. The imaginative story he tells rates higher. This book falls firmly among the stacks of "negative utopias" as described by...thinker Erich Fromm.
- As I read F451, it was clear Bradbury's influence on modern writers like Koontz and King; and also McCarthy's The Road. The fact that he typed much of the text on rented typewriters in the UCLA library basement, while he and his young family scraped by, only raised my respect. ( )
  ThoughtPolice | Aug 11, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 670 (next | show all)
Ray Bradbury, escritor americano (1920), alcançou sucesso basicamente em 1950, com suas Crônicas Marcianas. Embora não seja um bestseller, Bradbury tem um alto conceito nos meios literário, educacional e de entretenimento dos Estados Unidos como "consultor de idéias", dramaturgo, poeta e ensaísta. Atua também como roteirista de cinema desde 1953, tendo recebido um Oscar pelo roteiro de Moby Dick, filme dirigido por John Huston (? - 1987).

Fahrenheit 451 (1953), que se chamaria The Fire Man, nos fala de um mundo onde os livros foram abolidos, sendo proibido até possuí-los. As pessoas se contentam em passar os dias vendo programas de televisão - cujos aparelhos ocupam as quatro paredes dos cômodos da sala de estar - e seu único interesse é comentar os programas, novelas ou comerciais, cantando seus jingles e seus bordões em todos os lugares, metrô, praças e onde quer que vão [não sei, mas ultimamente tenho ouvido exatamente isso sobre o BBB]. Esses jingles são daquele tipo de música que se fixam em nossas cabeças e não conseguimos desligar – alguma semelhança com nossa cultura atual?

Em 1966, François Truffaut colocou nas telas a história de Bradbury, que segundo o próprio, foi bastante modificada para sanar alguns mistérios que o livro deixou pendentes. Porém, na re-edição, ele mesmo se explica no posfácio, decidiu deixar o texto original, mesmo que isso inquietasse alguns de seus leitores mais antigos, inconformados com as lacunas na história ou mesmo com o destino final de alguns personagens.

O livro passa a sensação de que o autor, já em 1953, visualizava os desdobramentos de uma cultura massificada, na qual idéias originais, a observação crítica do mundo, dos costumes e o questionamento do status quo, têm cada vez menos espaço.

O mais lamentável é que os habitantes desse mundo se autoalienaram. Não houve sequer a necessidade das autoridades convencê-los ou mesmo forçá-los a deixar os livros de lado. Porém, uma vez que eles abandonaram o hábito da leitura de livre e espontânea vontade, começou um movimento repressivo e de caça aos resistentes, teimosos em achar a leitura algo importante para a vida. A repressão era executada pelos bombeiros através de incêndios de pilhas de livros. A razão dos moradores da cidade (ela não tem nome) deixarem de ler foi a verificação de que ficavam mais felizes sem as idéias que os livros traziam. Os livros faziam pensar, pensar fazia sofrer, enxergar o mundo de muitas formas e pontos de vista. O indivíduo se dava conta, então, da dor do outro no mundo. E afinal por que alguém gostaria de ser infeliz?

O paradoxo é que os bombeiros já não apagavam mais incêndios, pois todas as edificações eram cobertas com uma camada de material não inflamável. Sua tarefa agora era queimar o maior número de livros, todo e qualquer remanescente de bibliotecas públicas ou particulares.

Bradbury (2003, p.79) nos mostra o vazio de um mundo imagético, midiático e hedonista. Através do diálogo do personagem Beatty, chefe dos bombeiros, com Montag, o bombeiro que começa a questionar o mundo em que vive, o autor explica que o mundo passou a ser todo resumido, pois as pessoas não têm mais paciência de ler:

“Clássicos reduzidos para se adaptarem a programas de rádio de quinze minutos, depois reduzidos novamente para uma coluna de livro de dois minutos de leitura, e, por fim, encerrando-se num dicionário, num verbete de dez a doze linhas [...] o Hamlet não passava de um resumo de uma página num livro que proclamava: Agora você finalmente pode ler todos os clássicos; faça como seus vizinhos.”

E vai mais longe em algumas reflexões, que a mim parecem muito com o tipo de educação média que temos hoje – pelo menos no Brasil:

“A escolaridade é abreviada, a disciplina relaxada, as filosofias, as histórias e as línguas são abolidas, gramática e ortografia pouco a pouco negligenciadas, e, por fim, quase totalmente ignoradas. A vida é imediata, o emprego é o que conta, o prazer está por toda parte depois do trabalho. Por que aprender alguma coisa além de apertar botões, acionar interruptores, ajustar parafusos e porcas?” (Bradbury, 2003, p.80).

Sobre a questão de maiorias x minorias, demonstra a complexidade da questão. Existe um ditado que diz “que toda maioria é burra”, mas já refletimos sobre as minorias? Falo aqui de minorias que querem impor seus pontos de vista, modos de vida e idéias à maioria, sem deixar que outras minorias dentro da maioria tenham sua própria voz. Diz Bradbury (2003, p.82):

“Agora tomemos as minorias de nossa civilização, certo? Quanto maior a população, mais minorias. Não pise no pé dos amigos dos cães, dos amigos dos gatos, dos médicos, advogados, comerciantes, patrões, mórmons, batistas, unitaristas, chineses de segunda geração, suecos, italianos, alemães, texanos, gente do Brooklyn, irlandeses, imigrantes do Oregon ou do México. [Eu acrescentaria, para atualizar, os muçulmanos]. Os personagens desse livro, dessa peça, desse seriado de tevê não pretendem representar pintores, cartógrafos, engenheiros reais. [...] quanto maior seu mercado, menos você controla a controvérsia! Todas as menores das menores minorias querem ver seus próprios umbigos, bem limpos. Autores cheios de maus pensamentos, tranquem suas máquinas de escrever! [para atualizar, seus PCs e notebooks].

E assim, não se pode escrever (ou falar) sobre quase mais nada, pois se tem sobre a cabeça uma espada de um processo de calúnia e difamação, ou ser taxado de preconceituoso – lembrando que preconceitos sempre têm dois lados. Essa é a democracia atual no Ocidente e que no livro já se entrevê. Um amigo disse um dia, que qualquer pessoa pode dizer o que quiser, o problema é quando o atingido se ressente e age de uma forma rancorosa. Eis o problema. Se eu disser que você é gordo, feio, negro, homossexual, prostituta, de esquerda, de direita, etc. posso ser presa ou processada. Mas como evitar? Somos humanos, nada mais que humanos. Existe solução para as diferenças individuais? Ou nos tornaremos todos iguais, como no livro Henfil na China (1984, desculpem, mas sou dessa geração), vestindo as mesmas roupas, recitando os mesmos mestres (Mao, Lênin, Stalin) e pensando, fazendo, lendo e assistindo só o quê e indo só aonde é permitido pelo partido, ou pela ditadura do politicamente correto e do eufemismo? Será que algum tipo de transgressão na mesmice não é nem um pouco salutar?

Mas sempre existem sim alguns transgressores. Não existe unanimidade na espécie humana, a divergência é algo esperado porque renova e inova. É o motor da mudança social. Na página 100, Montag conversa com Faber, um professor de inglês aposentado, que há quarenta anos fora descartado, “quando a última faculdade de ciências humanas foi fechada por falta de alunos e patrocínio” [não sei porque, mas tenho uma sensação de déjà vu]. Como ele, outros intelectuais foram dispensados, pois eram o veículo para a infelicidade humana, afinal questionavam as coisas e não deixavam que as pessoas esquecessem que nem elas, nem o mundo eram perfeitos. E isso é muito perigoso.

Mas em um mundo em que ler também é muito perigoso, talvez a atitude mais prudente seja a dada por Beatty, o Chefe dos Bombeiros, no fim fictício que Bradbury colocou no posfácio do livro. Depois de tantos anos incendiando livros, ele revela a Montag uma grande biblioteca escondida em sua casa. Montag pergunta: - Mas o senhor é o Queimador-Chefe! Não pode ter livros em sua casa! Beatty responde: - O crime não é ter livros, Montag, o crime é lê-los! Sim, é isso mesmo. Eu tenho livros, mas não os leio.

Bem, mesmo que nós adquiramos livros com maior velocidade do os lemos, só nos resta esperar ter tempo de vida suficiente para ler a maior quantidade possível e não transformar nossa sociedade no mundo de Montag.
added by mcrbarreto | editPessoal, Cristina Barreto (Feb 2, 2010)
 
Classique parmi les classiques, Fahrenheit 451 est à la SF ce que le Dracula de Stocker est au fantastique. Cette œuvre est une contre-utopie à la mesure du Meilleur des mondes de Huxley ou à 1984 de Orwell. C’est dire…
 
This intriguing idea might well serve as a foundation on which to build a worst of all possible worlds. And to a certain extent it does not seem implausible. Unfortunately, Bradbury goes little further than his basic hypothesis. The rest of the equation is jerry-built.
 

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Bradbury, RayAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aguilar, Julia OsunaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Aldiss, Brian W.Forewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Škvorecký, JosefTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Buddingh', CeesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chambon, JacquesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crespo, AlfredoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
D'Achille, GinoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Diamond, DonnaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Emmerová, JarmilaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Güttinger, FritzTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hoye, StephenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hurt, ChristopherNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kayalıoğlu, KorkutTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kayalıoğlu, ZerrinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keyser, GawieForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knipel, CidTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Monicelli, GiorgioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moorcock, MichaelIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mugnaini, Joseph A.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nordin, SivTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennington, BruceCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pepper, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prichard, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robbins, TimNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robillot, HenriTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stangl, KatrinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weber, SamIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Contains

Has the adaptation

Has as a reference guide/companion

Has as a student's study guide

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"If they give you ruled paper,
write the other way."
Juan Ramón Jiménez
FAHRENHEIT 451:
the temperature at which
book-paper catches fire and burns
Dedication
This one, with gratitude,
is for
Don Congdon
First words
It was a pleasure to burn.
Quotations
It doesn't matter what you do, he said, so long as you change something from the way it was before you touched it into something that's like you after you take your hands away.
But that's the wonderful things about man; he never gets so discouraged or disgusted that he gives up doing it all over again, because he knows very well it is important and worth the doing.
But remember that the Captain belongs to the most dangerous enemy of truth and freedom, the solid unmoving cattle of the majority. Oh, God, the terrible tyranny of the majority.
I'm afraid of children my own age. they kill each other. Did it always use to be that way? My uncle says no. Six of my firends have been shot in the last year alone. Ten of them died in car wrecks. I'm afraid of them and they don't like me because I'm afraid. My uncle says his grandfather remembered when children didn't kill each other. But that was a long time ago when they had things different. They believed in responsibility, my uncle says. Do you know, I'm responsible. I was spanked when I needed it, years ago. And I do all the shopping and housecleaning by hand.
The same infinite detail and awareness could be projected through the radios and televisors, but are not. No, no, it's not books at all you're looking for! Take it where you can find it, in old phonograph records, old motion pictures, and in old friends; look for it in nature and look for it in yourself. Books were only one type of receptacle where we stored a lot of things we were afraid we might forget. There is nothing magical in them at all. The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us. Of course you couldn't know this, of course you still can't understand what I mean when I say all this.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
This is the original novel by Ray Bradbury, not the 1966 film directed by François Truffaut or any other adaptation.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Book description
"The system was simple. Everyone understood it. Books were for burning... along with the houses in which they were hidden." Fahrenheit 451 is an enlightening story that is almost daunting. In a place where firemen build fires to burn books, this story is somewhat forboding because although it may seem extreme, it causes the reader to look at how much we take books and freedom for granted. Guy Montag goes outside the norm of a society where relationships are based on material things in order to try to discover how life would be if one were to actually think and live for themselves instead of being told what to do and how to behave.

AR level 5.2, 7 pts
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0345342968, Mass Market Paperback)

In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury's classic, frightening vision of the future, firemen don't put out fires--they start them in order to burn books. Bradbury's vividly painted society holds up the appearance of happiness as the highest goal--a place where trivial information is good, and knowledge and ideas are bad. Fire Captain Beatty explains it this way, "Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs.... Don't give them slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy."

Guy Montag is a book-burning fireman undergoing a crisis of faith. His wife spends all day with her television "family," imploring Montag to work harder so that they can afford a fourth TV wall. Their dull, empty life sharply contrasts with that of his next-door neighbor Clarisse, a young girl thrilled by the ideas in books, and more interested in what she can see in the world around her than in the mindless chatter of the tube. When Clarisse disappears mysteriously, Montag is moved to make some changes, and starts hiding books in his home. Eventually, his wife turns him in, and he must answer the call to burn his secret cache of books. After fleeing to avoid arrest, Montag winds up joining an outlaw band of scholars who keep the contents of books in their heads, waiting for the time society will once again need the wisdom of literature.

Bradbury--the author of more than 500 short stories, novels, plays, and poems, including The Martian Chronicles and The Illustrated Man--is the winner of many awards, including the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America. Readers ages 13 to 93 will be swept up in the harrowing suspense of Fahrenheit 451, and no doubt will join the hordes of Bradbury fans worldwide. --Neil Roseman

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:59 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Fireman Guy Montag is a fireman whose job it is to start fires. And he loves to rush to a fire and watch books burn, along with the houses in which they were hidden. Then he meets a seventeen-year old girl who tells him of a past when people were not afraid, and a professor who tells him of a future where people can think. And Guy Montag knows what he has to do ...… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 36 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.03)
0.5 15
1 99
1.5 43
2 467
2.5 120
3 1890
3.5 507
4 4128
4.5 531
5 3773

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,978,892 books! | Top bar: Always visible