HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher
Loading...

The Shell Seekers (1987)

by Rosamunde Pilcher

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,845593,010 (4.02)87
  1. 80
    The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer (MyriadBooks)
  2. 30
    Coming Home by Rosamunde Pilcher (MyriadBooks)
  3. 00
    The Nest by Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney (thea-block)
    thea-block: Similar stories of inheritance, entitled children, and the interactions between wealth/society/family. Startlingly similar characters - almost feels like the same story 30 years apart!
  4. 01
    Angel Puss by Colleen McCullough (Fliss88)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 87 mentions

English (53)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  Hungarian (1)  Greek (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (59)
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
One of my all-time favorites! ( )
  agjuba | Dec 29, 2018 |
I am surprisingly unhappy with this book. It is one-dimensional, with the "bad" characters like cartoons, and the lovely "good" characters so impossibly wonderful that it's hard to accept them. I bought this as "comfort reading" but it's so annoying that I'm not sure the word "comfort" actually applies.

----------------

Having finished the book, I like it a bit better, but only a bit. I won't seek out another book by Pilcher. ( )
  CatherineBurkeHines | Nov 28, 2018 |
No valid German National Library records retrieved.
  glsottawa | Apr 4, 2018 |
If you open The Shell Seekers to a random page, you are most likely going to find very detailed, often beautiful, prose. Here's an example:

Olivia knew that she would never tire of the painting, even if she lived with it for most of her life. Its impact hit you like a gust of cold, salty air, The windy sky, racing with clouds; the sea, scudding with white-caps, breaking waves hissing up onto the shore. The subtle pinks and greys of the sand; shallow pools left by the ebbing tide and shimmering with translucent reflected sunlight. And the figures of the three children, grouped to the side of the picture; two girls with straw hats and dresses bundled up, and a boy. All brown-limbed, barefoot, and intent on the contents of a small scarlet bucket.

I loved the idea of writing about the daughter of a famous artist and her bohemian upbringing. So many books concentrate of people in positions of fame and power, but their families have stories to tell as well. I also loved having so much of the plot center around a painting which works as a metaphor for many of the family issues.

Yet, the novel didn't catch me. I was easily distracted, even at the most critical parts. Part of this was due to the descriptions, which were lovely, but too numerous. I found myself skimming descriptions of landscapes as the novel went on, especially the lists of flowers. But more than that it was the characters and a feeling that the author was intruding with her own opinions. When I was done with the book, I was left with the feeling Rosamunde Pilcher had great respect for stoicism.

The scenes of Penelope as a girl and a young woman were interesting, especially when the American troops were camped in Porthkerris. Yet Penelope's interactions with the important people in her life never seemed to have much emotion, even when she claimed to be in love. This was also true of Olivia, especially at the end of the novel, which might explain why Penelope's relation with her middle child worked.

I would recommend The Shell Seekers to readers who enjoy careful descriptions, historical settings, and a unique picture of rural England.

Steve Lindahl – author of Hopatcong Vision Quest, White Horse Regressions, and Motherless Soul ( )
1 vote SteveLindahl | Jan 16, 2018 |
Loved this story of generations - Loved the mini-series ... Loved it! ( )
  KPhotoWrtr2 | Sep 12, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rosamunde Pilcherprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gordon, HannahNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
This book is for my children,
and their children.
First words
She sometimes thought that for her, Nancy Chamberlain, the most straightforward or innocent occupation was doomed to become, inevitably, fraught with tedious complication.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312961324, Mass Market Paperback)

At the end of a long and useful life, Penelope Keeling's prized possession is The Shell Seekers, painted by her father, and symbolizing her unconventional life, from bohemian childhood to wartime romance. When her grown children learn their grandfather's work is now worth a fortune, each has an idea as to what Penelope should do. But as she recalls the passions, tragedies, and secrets of her life, she knows there is only one answer...and it lies in her heart.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:20 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

A mild heart attack confronts Penelope Stern with her own mortality, and she decides to return to the small town of Porthkerris on the coast of Cornwall. There she will visit the scenes of her famous father's artistic life.

» see all 11 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.02)
0.5 3
1 10
1.5 2
2 26
2.5 13
3 139
3.5 28
4 228
4.5 22
5 272

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 132,629,857 books! | Top bar: Always visible