HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Leading Geeks: How to Manage and Lead the People Who Deliver Technology

by Paul Glen

Other authors: David H. Maister (Foreword)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
781263,258 (3.64)None
Winner of the 2003 Financial Times Germany/getAbstract Business& Finance Book Award Leading Geeks challenges the conventional wisdom thatleadership methods are universal and gives executives and managersthe understanding they need to manage and lead the technologists onwhom they have become so dependent. This much-needed book? writtenin nontechnical language by Paul Glen, a highly acclaimedmanagement consultant? gives clear directions on how to effectivelylead these brilliant yet notoriously resistant-to-being-managedknowledge workers. Glen not only provides proven managementstrategies but also background on why traditional approaches oftendon't work with geeks. Leading Geeks describes the beliefsand behavior of geeks, their group dynamics, and the unique natureof technical work. It also offers a unique twelve-part model thatexplains how knowledge workers deliver value to anorganization.… (more)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

At first glance, this book has an appealing title and would seem to be useful for a course on IT Team Leadership. Upon closer inspection, however, the book fails to historicize technical work -- as if technical work were something that appeared with the computer. Carr's treatments of technical work, for instance, are more convincing precisely because Carr places technical work within an historical context.
  mdobe | Dec 3, 2011 |
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Paul Glenprimary authorall editionscalculated
Maister, David H.Forewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Publisher Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Winner of the 2003 Financial Times Germany/getAbstract Business& Finance Book Award Leading Geeks challenges the conventional wisdom thatleadership methods are universal and gives executives and managersthe understanding they need to manage and lead the technologists onwhom they have become so dependent. This much-needed book? writtenin nontechnical language by Paul Glen, a highly acclaimedmanagement consultant? gives clear directions on how to effectivelylead these brilliant yet notoriously resistant-to-being-managedknowledge workers. Glen not only provides proven managementstrategies but also background on why traditional approaches oftendon't work with geeks. Leading Geeks describes the beliefsand behavior of geeks, their group dynamics, and the unique natureof technical work. It also offers a unique twelve-part model thatexplains how knowledge workers deliver value to anorganization.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.64)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 2
3.5
4 3
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 155,633,689 books! | Top bar: Always visible