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Chroniques birmanes by Guy Delisle

Chroniques birmanes (original 2007; edition 2007)

by Guy Delisle

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5333918,919 (4.07)42
Title:Chroniques birmanes
Authors:Guy Delisle
Info:Delcourt (2007), Edition: DELCOURT, Paperback
Collections:Your library
Tags:voyage, Birmanie, Myanmar, bande dessinée

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Burma Chronicles by Guy Delisle (2007)


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English (31)  Dutch (3)  French (3)  Danish (1)  German (1)  All languages (39)
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
I really liked this book. The author and illustrator, Guy Delisle, is a cartoonist who spends time in Burma with his wife who is stationed there for Doctors Without Borders. Delisle depicts daily life in Burma and his experiences there with humor and satirical wit, and just the right amount of seriousness. Obviously a book about life in a totalitarian state could be quite depressing, and while this book by no means ignores the issues of oppression, it recognizes something in the country other than the horrors of a military dictatorship. It is hard to describe, but the illustrations and the text were entertaining and touching, and I really grew to like the author and his family. ( )
  klburnside | Aug 11, 2015 |
Excellent story, really enjoyed, do not yet own it, but seek to add it to my collection ASAP, brilliantly done ( )
  Claire5555 | Mar 9, 2015 |
Interesting non-fiction travelogue of expatriate life in Burma in graphic novel format. ( )
  AThurman | Dec 7, 2014 |
Burma Chronicles by Guy Delisle is one from a series of graphic novel memoirs of his time in a particular part of the world while his wife is on assignment for Doctors without Borders. Burma Chronicles (originally Chroniques burmanes) covers the time spent living in Myanmar.

While his wife works at the clinic, he spends his time between raising their infant son and writing (and drawing) his memoir. The book is divided into small vignettes of panel comics on a given topic — finding a home, learning the language, living with the heat, etc.

Mixed in with the mundane, there are also observations on the political and economic situation. They live just around the corner from a political prisoner. As foreigners they are not allowed anywhere near her home.

Interestingly, though, Delisle also chronicles how easy it is to become complacent. He shows himself in one vignette filled with plans to participate (for instance, getting up each dawn to feed the monks) or to rebel (trying to see the political prisoner). But each time, though, the vignette ends with "Next morning" and he's either sleeping in or doing something else — the grand plans long forgotten.

Although I found some of the pacing a little slow, it was fascinating enough that I plan to track down other travelogues in this series. ( )
  pussreboots | Nov 10, 2014 |
A memoir in cartoons of a year spent in Burma in 2005, where his wife was working with MSF France. Some vignettes are totally personal and non-political (at the very beginning, his sticking airport luggage stickers over electrical outlets so his toddler son won't stick his fingers in them; later, coming across pop tarts in a supermarket and remembering the joys of searing your tongue on them, fresh from the toaster), others touch on the repressiveness of the regime there (as when one of the members of his informal animation tutorial has to stop coming once Guy's name and picture are featured in an article (in a non-Burmese paper, but still) critical of the regime. I was very moved by some of the vignettes--for example, his wife rushing to find jobs for all the local people MSF France has employed, when the organization decides to pull out, and his creation of a book for HIV-positive children to get them to help their parents remember to give them their antiretroviral each day. The art also really evokes a sense of place; I especially noticed how his representation of shadows made me aware of the heat of the place. Nice book.

ETA: I went to the author's website to ask if Millie's Angels, the book for HIV positive children, was available at all. He replied that he had only one copy, himself, and that he didn't think it had even been reprinted in Burma. As a result of going to his website, though, I did get another book of his, A User's Guide to Neglectful Parenting, which was great. ( )
  FrancescaForrest | May 12, 2014 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Guy Delisleprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dascher, HelgeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In this country notorious for its use of concealment and isolation as social control - where scissors-wielding censors monitor the papers, the de facto leader of the opposition has been under decade-long house arrest, insurgent-controlled regions are effectively cut off from the world, and rumour is the most reliable source current information - he turns his gaze to the everyday for a sense of the bigger picture.Delisle's deft and recognisable renderings take note of almsgiving rituals, daylong power-cuts and rampant heroin use in outlying regions, in this place where catastrophic mismanagement and ironhanded rule come up against profound resilience of spirit, expatriate life ambles along, and non-governmental organisations struggle with the risk of co-option by the military junta. "The Burma Chronicles" is drawn with a minimal line, and interspersed with wordless vignettes and moments of Delisle's distinctive slapstick humour.… (more)

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