HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

On Beyond a Million: An Amazing Math Journey…
Loading...

On Beyond a Million: An Amazing Math Journey (edition 2001)

by David M. Schwartz, Paul Meisel (Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
160None74,855 (2.9)1
kratzerliz23's review
This book helps its readers understand how the number system is based on multiples of 10 and how these multiples of 10 can be written in exponential form. The pictures illustrating how powers of 10 can be multiplied to get larger numbers are self explanatory, but the book contains many sidebars. These sidebars denote "Did you know statements" concerning numbers, but these numbers are not written using the powers of 10. If a teacher were to use this book for demonstrating how the powers of 10 work, much explaining would be needed. Another confusing aspect about the book concerns made up words used to represent extremely large numbers. The professor's illustration that is used to teach about large numbers even states that students can make up their own nonsense numbers, i.e. elephantillion, It is very confusing. I would not recommend this book. ( )
  kratzerliz23 | Apr 26, 2012 |
All member reviews
Showing 6 of 6
This is an excellent illustrated book which uses a class problem to explore Power Counting. After starting off with small numbers and a few examples, the book takes off exponentially into larger numbers and a density of examples. Children journey through a million, billion, ventillion, on through a googol, and to infinity! Lots of great quick facts along the way. Even a math teacher like me will learn something from this book. ( )
  mapalumbo | Jan 19, 2014 |
"On Beyond A Million" reminds me of the Magic School bus series for math teachers. It covers the journey of a popcorn machine that goes crazy and keeps popping popcorn over and over again. He uses this as an opportunity to teach kids on estimation, powers of 10, and scientific notation. Why not make a lesson out of it? The book is a great blend of story telling with facts. It breaks off and has mini-lessons throughout the pages for clarification and math enrichment. The professor is illustrated in a way that makes him look like Einstein. I think this is not a coincidence. The book is written in dialogue between Professor X and his students. It is like a large comic strip which makes itself appealing. I would definitely use this book in my classroom. I could use it to introduce exponents and powers of 10. I could also use it as book that I could have on my bookshelf that I know would provide a great read for my students that will both be entertaining and educational. This book would be a great hook and I am thankful for finding it! ( )
  hsbrouss | Jan 28, 2013 |
"On Beyond a Million" tells a story of Professor X who has a popcorn machine that goes out of control and continuously pops popcorn. Wanting to teach the kids how to count the popcorn, he uses powers of 10 and scientific notation as a strategy. The book does an great job to demonstrate how our number system is base 10 and what happens to numbers when multiplied by powers of 10. The author includes sidebars that has extra information about numbers. The only issue I have the book tells the students they can make up their own names for very large numbers which is not true. this part would need clarification if used during class or could be left out altogether. I would include this book as an opener in my lessons on scientific notation. It is an interesting way to start a lesson. ( )
  kgeorge | Nov 17, 2012 |
This book helps its readers understand how the number system is based on multiples of 10 and how these multiples of 10 can be written in exponential form. The pictures illustrating how powers of 10 can be multiplied to get larger numbers are self explanatory, but the book contains many sidebars. These sidebars denote "Did you know statements" concerning numbers, but these numbers are not written using the powers of 10. If a teacher were to use this book for demonstrating how the powers of 10 work, much explaining would be needed. Another confusing aspect about the book concerns made up words used to represent extremely large numbers. The professor's illustration that is used to teach about large numbers even states that students can make up their own nonsense numbers, i.e. elephantillion, It is very confusing. I would not recommend this book. ( )
  kratzerliz23 | Apr 26, 2012 |
This book could be a great introduction to a lesson on exponents and scientific notation. On Beyond a Million is about Professor X's popping machine that is out of control. The kids want to count the kernels and keep counting up to the biggest number in the world, so Professor X teaches them to count by powers of 10. This book has many real-life examples accompanying the large numbers and the pictures help make counting visually interesting. The only downside is that I lost count of all the zeroes in numbers after a trillion and I didn't catch up again until reaching googol (which has 100 zeroes). Still, I think kids could learn a great deal about numbers from this book. I'd recommend this book for students in sixth or seventh grade because that's about when many students start learning about powers of ten and can understand the concept of infinity. Maybe a teacher could introduce powers of ten with this book and then return to this book after students study powers of ten. Students would probably be amazed at how much they've learned! ( )
  landism | Dec 10, 2011 |
Today I will be reviewing the book, On Beyond a Million, by David M. Schwartz.

You're probably wondering what the "M" stands for? We don't really know, but we're guessing it stands for "Math Mutant." Get it? He's a Mathematician and Author, and he's a bit crazy about math.

Mr. Schwartz has loved big numbers since he was a kid. We found out about that at the Author Visit at my old school, Bell Top Elementary School. Who knows? Maybe he is planning to visit your local school next.

You're probably waiting for me to review his book, On Beyond a Million. So, without further ado, I will commence reviewing the book. You shall wait no longer. You're patience is about to be rewarded, so I will pause no longer, and I will begin to review right now, with no more pause in between. You shall use no more waiting skills. Ow, ouch, stop it, Mom, I'll get to the point! Okay, what a grouch!

On Beyond a Million is an outstanding book about the powers of ten, and how numbers go on forever, and you can never reach Google or infinity. It even has a fictional story to it about a popcorn machine going haywire that won't stop or turn off.

David Schwartz told us that his book was inspired by a story in Homer Price, by Robert McCloskey, about a donut machine that won't stop making donuts.

Did you know that it would take David M. Schwartz two and a half years to pop a million kernels of popcorn?

This is a picture of the author with 10,000 popped kernels of popcorn. He told us that he wasn't able to bring his bag with 100,000 popcorn kernels because it was too big for the airplane. It took him 3 months to pop that many popcorn kernels, but he decided not to make one million because it would take him 2 and a half years.

Still, he had a picture of ONE MILLION POPPED POPCORN KERNELS! When he visited a school in Texas, they like big things in Texas, so they surprised him with one million popped popcorn kernels.

Counting by the powers of 10 is multiplying the number you have by 10 each time. This is useful for counting really big things like overflowing popcorn flooding the whole school. Instead of saying 1,2, 3, 4..., you'd say 100, 1,000, 10,000, 1,000,000, ten million, one hundred million, one billion. And you'd show this by writing 10 to the power of 6, which is one million.

Take a look at this YouTube Video, Powers of Ten. It is really cool because it shows what happens when you move 10 times farther away, every second. If you moved out into space, by the powers of 10, you would enter distances light years away really quickly.

Then, they return the same way, in distances that are powers of 10 closer, until they enter the starting point, a napping picnicker. They magnify and enter his hand, using a microscope, which is really cool!!! They keep going until you see the nucleus of one of his cells.

I highly recommend the book and the video to people who want to read a cool book, or watch an awesome video!

See blog: http://spedr.com/388fa ( )
  laf | Apr 30, 2009 |
Showing 6 of 6

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
23 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (2.9)
0.5 1
1 1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 3
3.5 2
4 5
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 89,457,356 books! | Top bar: Always visible