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Ouch! by Natalie Babbitt
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Ouch! (original 1998; edition 1998)

by Natalie Babbitt, Fred Marcellino (Illustrator)

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617194,696 (3.71)None
cassielanzas's review
Ouch! is a Grimm story tale retold by Natalie Babbitt and illustrated by Fred Marcellino. A young man is born with a birthmark and is destined to become a prince. The king tries to intervene, yet fails. The young man completes all tasks, however impossible, set before him. The young man ends up being a king, while the king ends up rowing the boat to hell.

I enjoyed this book. Marcellino's illustrations never disappoint and the Grimm tale is entertaining. This would be an excellent read around book in a classroom. ( )
  cassielanzas | Apr 29, 2012 |
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This is not a book that I traditionally would have expected to like as much as I did. It is a great retelling of a Grimm folk tale and I truly loved Fred Marcellino's illustrations. Natalie Babbitt is fanciful with her writing, which is just what this tale needed. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story and would certainly recommend it - even though I could see how the trip to Hell and run-in with the Devil may be controversial for some parents and/or teachers. ( )
  L_Cochran | Mar 10, 2014 |
Natalie Babbitt - author of such children's classics as Tuck Everlasting and The Search for Delicious - turns her attention to the Brothers Grimm in this delightful retelling of their Der Teufel mit den drei goldenen Haaren ("The Devil With the Three Golden Hairs"). When a baby is born with a birthmark in the shape of a crown, and it is foretold that he will marry a princess, the local king sets out to prevent such a thing. But none of his skullduggery - from tossing the baby into a river, to sending him (as a young man) to fetch three golden hairs from the devil - produces the results he expected...

Babbitt has a fondness for devil stories it would seem, as witnessed by her two collections, The Devil's Storybook and The Devil's Other Storybook. Her narrative flows well, although I did wonder why she chose to omit two of the three questions that are answered by the devil, as his grandmother plucks his golden hairs. Perhaps she wanted to make the tale a little shorter? Fred Marcellino, who was awarded a Caldecott Honor for his work on Puss in Boots, captures the humor and emotion of the story, with his expressive human faces and lovely color scheme. All in all, this is a definite must for fairy-tale fans, although some readers might wonder as Babbitt's odd choice of title. ( )
  AbigailAdams26 | Apr 10, 2013 |
A true Grimm fairy tale with wonderful illustrations. This story has hidden meanings and a moral that I believe can be discussed with older students. ( )
  ashoemak | Jan 31, 2013 |
The regular family of a baby boy born with a crown-shaped birthmark is told by a fortuneteller that the baby is destined to marry a princess. The king, with a daughter of the same age refuses to allow his daughter to marry nobody special and attempts to kill the baby boy. When the boy is sixteen, the King learns he is still alive and goes to more great lengths to eliminate him, including sending him on a mission into Hell. Will the boy survive the journey and be able to marry his princess? This picture book is a retelling of a Grimm fairytale accompanied by realistic images that look like oil paintings. The images take up the majority of the page and are painted in rich, earthy tones. While the retelling of the story is not as dark as the original Grimm tales, there is no escaping the images of Hell and the devil. Also, the story may move a little quickly for some of the youngest readers, but more advanced elementary school readers will be enticed by the fast-paced action. This book is recommended for such readers. ( )
  sguzick | Nov 12, 2012 |
Ouch! is a Grimm story tale retold by Natalie Babbitt and illustrated by Fred Marcellino. A young man is born with a birthmark and is destined to become a prince. The king tries to intervene, yet fails. The young man completes all tasks, however impossible, set before him. The young man ends up being a king, while the king ends up rowing the boat to hell.

I enjoyed this book. Marcellino's illustrations never disappoint and the Grimm tale is entertaining. This would be an excellent read around book in a classroom. ( )
  cassielanzas | Apr 29, 2012 |
Part C/traditional litertaure

It is a retelling of one of Grimm's famous fairy tales. Marco borns with the birthmark of a crown; thus, he will become future king. When the current king finds out, he tries to get rid of the baby three times. The last quest is to get the devil's three golden hairs. Along the way, Marco is helped by the ferryman and the devil's grandmother who gives him the three hairs from her grandson.

The target audience is ages 4-8. I absolutely loved the illustations! However, I was not too crazy about the story's plot--it is not that believable. I don't think students can relate to it.
  ptnguyen | Jul 23, 2010 |
Bulletin Blue Ribbons, 1998 ; Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books;
The Children's Literature Choice List, 1999 ; Children's Literature;
Kirkus Book Review Stars, 1998 ;
Notable Books for Children, 1999 ; -ALSC; ( )
  AuntSandi | Jun 14, 2007 |
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