HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

South of No North: Stories of the Buried…
Loading...

South of No North: Stories of the Buried Life (edition 1988)

by Charles Bukowski

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
623515,603 (3.81)1
Member:brianeisley
Title:South of No North: Stories of the Buried Life
Authors:Charles Bukowski
Info:Black Sparrow Press (1988), Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:fiction

Work details

South of No North: Stories of the Buried Life by Charles Bukowski

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 5 of 5
Bukowskis simple, elegant, humourous and often brutal portrayal of lifes down and outers.
  nickrenkin | Mar 26, 2012 |
In the stories of South of No North, Charles Bukowski makes drinking, gambling, job-hating, living in fleabag dives, drunken sex, vomiting, agonizing over women, and agonizing over not writing (“hours of sitting in a chair in the middle of a room, run through and stricken”) seem almost romantic.

These are brutally funny stories. Bukowski’s alter ego Henry Chinaski narrates most of them. A magazine editor to Chinaski:
“I want you to interview this bitch who married the cannibal. Make the sex BIG. Mix love with horror, you know?” “I know. I’ve been doing it all my life.”

On his pessimistic view of life:
“I keep remembering the female who screamed at me: ‘You’re so god damned negative! Life can be beautiful!’
I suppose it can, and especially with a little less screaming.”

Speaking of pessimism, Chinaski on tourists in Avalon on Catalina Island: “square white rotting bodies, and striped shorts, eyeless eyes and mouthless mouths, they walked along, very colorful, as if color might wake up death and turn it into life.”

Chinaski is no less hard on himself: “Hospitals and jails and whores: these are the universities of life. I’ve got several degrees.”

These are searing stories that don’t hold back. More Chinaski on life: “We didn’t want much and couldn’t get that.” ( )
  Hagelstein | Oct 3, 2011 |
Taken as a whole I didn't enjoy this collection of shorts as much as Hot Water Music. Maybe I'm remembering HWM wrong but there seemed much more smut and self-aggrandizing in South of No North (the story where Chinaski beats up Hemmingway in a boxing match and scores with Thomas Wolfe's hot girlfriend being the most ludicrous, but funny, example of this).

True, the smut does become less prominent as the collection goes on (no more stories about men having sex with mannequins) and that's when Bukowski's writing starts to shine. All these stories might be about drunk writers and their "whores" but there's real emotion in Bukowski's writing and when he's at his best it can touch a raw nerve. It's just a shame you have to dig deep under all the sex and booze to find something worthwhile. ( )
  DRFP | Jun 8, 2011 |
Brilliant. ( )
  MColv9890 | May 13, 2011 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Ann Menebroker
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Information from the Spanish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Blurbers
Publisher series
Information from the Spanish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
94 wanted2 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.81)
0.5
1
1.5 2
2 4
2.5 2
3 35
3.5 12
4 45
4.5 5
5 29

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,732,545 books! | Top bar: Always visible