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SAS Desert Survival

by Barry Davies

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Anyone venturing into the desert, either by crossing on foot, vehicle, or in an aircraft (other than a commercial flight) should be prepared. Desert regions are those least likely to have an easily available source of water. Nevertheless, the survivor must find a water supply or they will die. No matter how abundant the rest of your survival resources are, without water your time is limited. To travel or stay put is one of the great dilemmas any survivor must face. The factors governing any decision should be based on where you are, your chances of survival if you stay put, where you intend moving to and the related hazards in getting there. Without communications it is difficult to assess whether there will be a rescue attempt, and even if there is, it would be presumptive to believe that they will locate you. Additionally, having the physical and mental ability, plus the resources to travel and reach a given point accurately is also a major factor.The SAS Guide to Desert Survival prepares the traveler for any situation they may find themselves in while venturing across desert and arid areas. It will explain the need for an immediate plan, as time will be against you, as well as how to dress for the ultimate protection from the sun and the cold (yes, deserts get very cold at night). The book will show you how and when to travel, as well as how to navigate a route to safety. The desert has two main advantages: the sun and the general clearness of visibility; a simple heliograph will flash a signal to both ground and air rescue services up to twenty-five miles away.… (more)

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Anyone venturing into the desert, either by crossing on foot, vehicle, or in an aircraft (other than a commercial flight) should be prepared. Desert regions are those least likely to have an easily available source of water. Nevertheless, the survivor must find a water supply or they will die. No matter how abundant the rest of your survival resources are, without water your time is limited. To travel or stay put is one of the great dilemmas any survivor must face. The factors governing any decision should be based on where you are, your chances of survival if you stay put, where you intend moving to and the related hazards in getting there. Without communications it is difficult to assess whether there will be a rescue attempt, and even if there is, it would be presumptive to believe that they will locate you. Additionally, having the physical and mental ability, plus the resources to travel and reach a given point accurately is also a major factor.The SAS Guide to Desert Survival prepares the traveler for any situation they may find themselves in while venturing across desert and arid areas. It will explain the need for an immediate plan, as time will be against you, as well as how to dress for the ultimate protection from the sun and the cold (yes, deserts get very cold at night). The book will show you how and when to travel, as well as how to navigate a route to safety. The desert has two main advantages: the sun and the general clearness of visibility; a simple heliograph will flash a signal to both ground and air rescue services up to twenty-five miles away.

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