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Where the Flame Trees Bloom

by Alma Flor Ada

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963214,424 (3.83)None
Includes eleven stories about the relatives and friends that were part of the author's childhood in Cuba.

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Where the Flame Tree Blooms is a collection of stories used to create a vivid memoir of Ada's childhood in Cuba. Some of the stories she includes are small vignettes of events from her childhood; others are stories are stories of her family that were told to her by her grandmother and great-grandmother about their childhood and young adulthood in Cuba.

Ada paints a vivid picture of the not only the landscape of the area she lived in but of the cultural landscape of Cuba during her childhood. There is such an intimate quality about the stories that I felt like I was transported to Ada's childhood and was hearing these stories at the knee of her grandmother or sitting beneath the roots of the flame tree with a Ada as a young girl. She brings the members of her family to life on the page with her vibrant descriptions of their physical features, their dress, and their mannerisms. Each story brings into focus the compassion and strength of the people Ada writes about, and what stands out most about each of the characters is their zest for life. ( )
  slpwhitehead | Jan 17, 2016 |
Where the Flame Tree Blooms is a collection of stories used to create a vivid memoir of Ada's childhood in Cuba. Some of the stories she includes are small vignettes of events from her childhood; others are stories are stories of her family that were told to her by her grandmother and great-grandmother about their childhood and young adulthood in Cuba.

Ada paints a vivid picture of the not only the landscape of the area she lived in but of the cultural landscape of Cuba during her childhood. There is such an intimate quality about the stories that I felt like I was transported to Ada's childhood and was hearing these stories at the knee of her grandmother or sitting beneath the roots of the flame tree with a Ada as a young girl. She brings the members of her family to life on the page with her vibrant descriptions of their physical features, their dress, and their mannerisms. Each story brings into focus the compassion and strength of the people Ada writes about, and what stands out most about each of the characters is their zest for life. ( )
  slpwhitehead | Jan 16, 2016 |
This will be used in an author study of Alma Flor Ada.

The students can map where Alma was born and how she immigrated to the United States. ( )
  p_gonzalez | Jun 6, 2011 |
Showing 3 of 3
From School Library Journal
Grade 3-6-Those who wonder what "family values" really are may possibly find the answer in this slim volume of short stories. Telling of her childhood in Cuba, Ada begins with an introduction to her homeland followed by 11 episodes about her family and her community. One story tells of her grandfather Modesto's courage and loyalty in the face of the death of his beloved wife and the simultaneous collapse of the Cuban economy. Another tells of her great-grandmother Mina, who continued to make rag dolls for the village children even after she had lost her sight. And a third tale tells of a Japanese street vendor who sold ice cream for a living, but gave generous samples to children who could not afford to pay. Warmth and love for a treasured childhood exude from the pages. The writing is elegant, but not overly sweet. Each selection stands well on its own. Children can read this book independently or enjoy listening to it read aloud.
Marilyn Long Graham, Lee County Library System, Fort Myers, FL
added by AlmaFlorAda | editSchool Library Journal, Graham Marilyn Long Fort Myers FL
 
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Includes eleven stories about the relatives and friends that were part of the author's childhood in Cuba.

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These true sto­ries from Alma Flor Ada’s child­hood are filled with fam­ily love and val­ues. Told through the eyes of a child, a whole world comes to life for the reader: the blind great-grandmother who never went to school but whose wis­dom and gen­eros­ity over­flowed to those around her; the hired hand Samoné whose love for music over­came all dif­fi­cul­ties; her grand­fa­ther Modesto, who placed a higher value on human rela­tion­ships than on his pos­ses­sions. Eleven remark­able sto­ries will move and inspire chil­dren and adults alike.
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