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Women in Their Beds: New and Selected Stories (1996)

by Gina Berriault

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291267,180 (3.52)8
"Half the women in the world are right now in bed, theirs or somebody else's, whether it's night or day, whether they want to be or not...." In the title story of Gina Berriault's latest collection, an unsure young actress watches as wrenching changes take place, row upon row, bed upon bed, in the women's ward of a hospital where she fills in as a social worker. Finding there both kindness and harsh fate, she also discovers a reflection of her own life." "Nine new stories are included in this collection of thirty-five. All are such models of economy that they seem almost telepathic. Berriault employs her vital sensibility - sometimes subtly ironic and sometimes achingly raw - to touch on the inevitability of suffering and the nature of individuality, daring to see into the essence of our predicaments. What moves us? What dictates our behavior? What alters us?" "These stories illustrate Berriault's depth of emotional understanding: the tragic loss of innocence in "The Stone Boy," where nine-year-old Arnold accidentally kills his brother with a shotgun; the pointed wit in "God and the Article Writer" where a man is first demeaned and then elated by his submission to the people he interviews."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved… (more)

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Have only read the first and title story so far, which is hilarious and moving. Look forward to reading the others. ( )
  William345 | Jun 11, 2014 |
A well-written collection of thirty-five stories about women. One reviewer calls them “tautly emotional, acutely intelligent, and, ultimately, humane.” The endings are never happy, and reading them was sometimes exhausting. Yet there is hope and courage to be found in each of them, amidst the suffering and disappointments that are part of the human condition. ( )
  MiserableLibrarian | Dec 26, 2007 |
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"Half the women in the world are right now in bed, theirs or somebody else's, whether it's night or day, whether they want to be or not...." In the title story of Gina Berriault's latest collection, an unsure young actress watches as wrenching changes take place, row upon row, bed upon bed, in the women's ward of a hospital where she fills in as a social worker. Finding there both kindness and harsh fate, she also discovers a reflection of her own life." "Nine new stories are included in this collection of thirty-five. All are such models of economy that they seem almost telepathic. Berriault employs her vital sensibility - sometimes subtly ironic and sometimes achingly raw - to touch on the inevitability of suffering and the nature of individuality, daring to see into the essence of our predicaments. What moves us? What dictates our behavior? What alters us?" "These stories illustrate Berriault's depth of emotional understanding: the tragic loss of innocence in "The Stone Boy," where nine-year-old Arnold accidentally kills his brother with a shotgun; the pointed wit in "God and the Article Writer" where a man is first demeaned and then elated by his submission to the people he interviews."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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