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Riverside Chaucer by Benson
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Riverside Chaucer (edition 1990)

by Benson

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1,565116,798 (4.4)42
Member:agbram
Title:Riverside Chaucer
Authors:Benson
Info:HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COL (1990), Hardcover
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Classics, Textbook, Poetry, Fiction

Work details

The Riverside Chaucer by Geoffrey Chaucer

Recently added byBookalook, timlemaire, tiffanyxie, EricJT, ReganSmith2, agenbiteofinwit, uemmak, private library, KinokoAnny
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» See also 42 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
This massive tome, 1327 pages in length, was the text used in my college Chaucer class, and provides a wonderful introduction to the works of this brilliant, but frequently under-appreciated poet. It contains all of Chaucer's major works, presented in their original Middle English; and includes the famous Canterbury Tales, The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, Troilus and Criseyde, and many other short pieces. The introduction and appendices provide some very useful background material, whether of a biographical or literary nature. The texts themselves are presented with explanatory vocabulary footnotes, fleshed out further by the scholarly notes and glossary at the conclusion of the volume.

I have loved The Canterbury Tales since first reading them in high school, and feel quite passionately that they are best appreciated in their original form. You have not really read Chaucer until you have read him in the Middle English, and The Riverside Chaucer provides the reader with a relatively pain-free way of doing just that. Full of unexpected humor, sly innuendo, and a witty wordplay that doesn't always translate in modern "updates," Chaucer's language is not so different from our own that it cannot be approached by the novice. I certainly had no experience reading Middle English before picking up this book, and somehow managed, with the help of the notes and vocabulary, to enjoy the experience.

One final note: although this book is similar in name and scope to the more ubiquitous The Riverside Shakespeare it is worth noting that it can boast of far better production values, being attractively bound on the outside, and printed upon good quality paper, that does not have the feel of newsprint. All in all, a beautiful volume, well worth owning. ( )
  AbigailAdams26 | Jun 28, 2013 |
English literature is downhill from Chaucer. Even as a Shakespeare scholar, I would argue this, since there are several characters in Chaucer who are as if live: The Wif of Bath, the Pardoner, the Host, the Canon's Yeoman, and a half dozen others, at least. Shakespeare's characters, on the other hand, are all stagey, bigger thanlife, infused with the stage. Or so it seems to me.
Chaucer's Wif even makes colloquial grammar mistakes when she self-consciously describes what men like about women's bodies, such as "hire armes smalle." (Coghill's otherwise fine translation nevertheless "corrects" the Wif's errors, missing the point, and missing her voice.)
Chaucer is outright, laugh-aloud funny, even in describing himself. The Host remarks how Chaucer as a pilgrim is staring at the ground while riding (shy?) and that he has a pot-belly like the Host himself. Chaucer gives himself the worst of the CT; he tells a memorized tale, which the Host interrupts as he would now interrupt rap, "This may we be rym doggerel"--this is doggerel!
As for Chaucer's superiority to all of English lit that follows, I would argue the same for Erasmus and H.S. education: Erasmus's Colloquiae, especially his Adulescens et Scortum, puts modern education books to shame. He wrote it for adolescent males, to teach them Latin, and it does this with a discussion between a prostitute and and a (High School-age) boy who's just been to Rome and reformed.
Admonition: Both Chaucer and Erasmus write essentially in a foreign language, the Middle English of
1390 being much closer to French--which in fact was used in Courts of Law in England for yet another century ( )
1 vote AlanWPowers | Jun 4, 2012 |
Troilus and Criseyde is an incredibly beautiful poem, very different from Shakespeare's disgusting (although equally brilliant in a very different way) retelling of the story. ( )
  Peter_Forster | Sep 15, 2011 |
I love Chaucer. All in one package you get lusty women, farting in mouths and the most boring store of courtly love. Plus, it sounds badass reading it aloud in middle english. ( )
  prophetandmistress | Mar 10, 2011 |
A superbe edition of chaucer's works in middle english. There is no modern translation but enough notes and textual commentaries to guide you through. It's all here: The Canterbury Tales of course but also the wonderful Troilus and Criseyde. Other lesser known works are here as well, but they are all deserving of your time. I Ioved the adrenelin rush of The House of fame and the witty Parliament of Fowles. The Book of the Duchess is quite beautiful also. There are also Chaucer's transaltions of the Romance of the rose and Boethius.

If you want to read more than the Canterbury tales then invest in this tome. ( )
  baswood | Jan 2, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (38 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Geoffrey Chaucerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Benson, Larry DeanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boitani, PieroEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robinson, Fred NorrisEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Contains

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

The Canterbury Tales, Volume I [Folio Society] by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Canterbury Tales, Volume II [Folio Society] by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Två Canterbury sägner by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Miller's Prologue and Tale (Selected Tales from Chaucer) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Merchant's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales: The Prologue by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Merchant's Prologue and Tale (Selected Tales from Chaucer) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Pardoner's Prologue and Tale (Selected Tales from Chaucer) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Book of the Duchess by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Nun's Priest's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Franklin's Prologue and Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Chaucer : the prologue, the knightes tale the nonne preestes tale from the Canterbury tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Knight's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Clerk's Prologue and Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Reeve's Prologue and Tale with the Cook's Prologue and the Fragment of his Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The prologue and three tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Reeve's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Tale of the Man of lawe;: The Pardoneres tale; the Second nonnes tale; the Chanouns yemannes tale, from the Canterbu by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The General Prologue: Part One A and Part One B (Variorum Chaucer Series) (Pt.1A) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Prioress's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Chaucer: The Prioresses Tale, Sir Thopas, The Monkes Tale, The Clerkes Tale, The Squieres Tale From The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Canterbury tales; the Prologue and four tales, with the Book of the duchess and six lyrics, by Frank Ernest Hill (indirect)

The Physician's Tale (The Doctor's Tale) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Squire's Tale (Variorum Chaucer Series) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Miller's Tale: Geoffrey Chaucer (Oxford Student Texts) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The manciple's tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Chaucer's Prologue and Knights Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

A Variorum Edition of the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer. Volume V: The Minor Poems, Part One by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Man of Law's tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Franklin's Tale: from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Parson's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The General Prologue & The Physician's Tale: In Middle English & In Modern Verse Translation (Naxos Audio) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Prioress' Prologue and Tale (Selected Tales from Chaucer) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Friar'S, Summoner'S, and Pardoner's Tales from the Canterbury Tales (Medieval and Renaissance Texts) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Franklin's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Prologue and the Knightes Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The prologue to the book of the tales of Canterbury, The knight's tale, The nun's priest's tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Canon's Yeoman's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Canon Yeoman's Prologue and Tale: From the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (Selected Tales from Chaucer) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Pardoners Tale (Complete Text (Naxos)) by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Miller's Tale -- Prologue by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Cook's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The Friar's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

The knightes tale, from the Canterbury tales of Geoffrey Chaucer by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Chaucer: The Knight's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer (indirect)

Troilus and Cressida; A Love Poem in Five Books by Geoffrey Chaucer

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PREFACE
This volume, begun under the general editorship of Robert A. Pratt, was originally intended to be a revision of F. N. Robinson's Second Edition of The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer.
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
This edition provides the general information on Chaucer's life, language, and works that one needs for a first reading of Chaucer, and difficult words and constructions are glossed on the pages.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0395290317, Hardcover)

This peerless new edition of Chaucer's complete works is the fruit of many years' study, and replaces Robinson's famous edition, long regarded as the standard text. Freshly edited and annotated, the "Riverside Chaucer" is now the indispensable edition for students and readers of Chaucer.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:17 -0400)

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