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The Pillars of the World

by Anne Bishop

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Tir Alainn Trilogy (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,2152111,356 (3.73)35
The first novel in New York Times bestselling author Anne Bishop's Tir Alainn Trilogy. The youngest in a long line of witches, Ari senses that things are changing--changing for the worse. For generations, her kin have tended the Old Places, keeping the land safe and fertile. But with the Summer Moon, the mood of her neighbors has soured. And Ari is no longer safe.   The Fae have long ignored what occurs in the mortal world, passing through on their shadowy roads only long enough to amuse themselves. But the roads are slowly disappearing, leaving the Fae Clans isolated and alone.   Where harmony between the spiritual and the natural has always reigned, a dissonant chord now rings in the ears of both Fae and mortal. And when murmurs of a witch-hunt hum through the town, some begin to wonder if the different omens are notes in the same tune.   And all they have to guide them is a passing reference to something called the Pillars of the World...… (more)
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» See also 35 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
The land of the Fae – Tir Alainn – is slowly disappearing and the only thing the Fae knows is that it has to do with witches. At the same time Morag, the Gatherer of souls, follow in the path of Inquisitors, witch hunters, as they slowly move across the land, leaving death behind. The Fae and the Inquisitors will eventually cross path in a place called Brightwood, home of the young witch Ari. The last of her line. Protector of an Old Place. And the fate of many people will be decided when that confrontation finally takes place.

The Pillars of the World presents us with a rather common, medieval-inspired fantasy world but I thought the characters and plot compelling enough to look beyond this. Witch hunts, Fae politics and some romance made up for a setting which, while overall pleasant, didn’t particularly stand out among other fantasy of this kind.

The book introduces us to a wide set of characters, some obviously more appealing than others. The Master Inquisitor, Adolpho, is just as despicable as he’s supposed to be. Ari lacks a bit of personality, though she is supposed to be quite young, so that might be why. The two men vying for her attention, Lucian and Neall, are both given about the same amount of “screen time” and it’s interesting to see the differences in their respective reasons for wanting Ari.

Morag the Gatherer, Death’s mistress, was by far my favourite character. In my opinion, she faces the greatest challenge and also makes the biggest sacrifice at the end of the book. I will continue to read the rest of this trilogy, and I absolutely hope we meet Morag again. Meeting Neall, Ari and the rest in the second book would be nice, but I don’t need to know more of their stories.

Overall a really nice read. The Pillars of the World is not the best or the most original fantasy story I’ve ever read, but it wasn’t the worst either. I think it could do well as something quick and easy you read between two heavier books.
( )
  LadyDarbanville | Jun 28, 2020 |
It had a slow beginning, and I honestly didn't care much for the story, or the characters until most of the way through the book. ( )
  clove311 | Jan 9, 2020 |
I was hiding in my air conditioned room for most of the weekend and had a nice comfort book to munch on. Lovely girly fantasy with witches, faeries, horses, even a puppy. Conflict came in the form of a nasty witch hunter, arrogant horny faeries and nasty villagers. It's the start of a trilogy, but complete in itself and much less dark than Bishop's Dark Jewel trilogy. Pass the popcorn, please...(August 30, 2004) ( )
  cindywho | May 27, 2019 |
There's a lot in this book. I did enjoy it ( )
  StarKnits | Feb 6, 2019 |
4.5 stars ( )
  mitabird | Jun 10, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Anne Bishopprimary authorall editionscalculated
Youll, Paulsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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For Pat York and Lynn Flewelling and in memory of Alan Mietlowski
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Another road was closing.
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The first novel in New York Times bestselling author Anne Bishop's Tir Alainn Trilogy. The youngest in a long line of witches, Ari senses that things are changing--changing for the worse. For generations, her kin have tended the Old Places, keeping the land safe and fertile. But with the Summer Moon, the mood of her neighbors has soured. And Ari is no longer safe.   The Fae have long ignored what occurs in the mortal world, passing through on their shadowy roads only long enough to amuse themselves. But the roads are slowly disappearing, leaving the Fae Clans isolated and alone.   Where harmony between the spiritual and the natural has always reigned, a dissonant chord now rings in the ears of both Fae and mortal. And when murmurs of a witch-hunt hum through the town, some begin to wonder if the different omens are notes in the same tune.   And all they have to guide them is a passing reference to something called the Pillars of the World...

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