HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Ideas Have Consequences by Richard M. Weaver
Loading...

Ideas Have Consequences

by Richard M. Weaver

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
582216,969 (4.35)2

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

English (1)  Spanish (1)  All (2)
This is, quite simply, a dreadful book to read. It's philosophical in nature; Weaver asserts a cause for the evils in society (back in the 40's or so), attempts to prove his assertion, and then offers a solution. It's full of terms and word meanings that are not common to those not already immersed in philosophy, and he makes no attempt to accommodate the new reader. And his solution doesn't really match his stated problem, so the book is even of questionable value. I really can't recommend it, except to those who are diehard fans of philosophy. ( )
  james.garriss | Sep 18, 2007 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0226876802, Paperback)

In what has become a classic work, Richard M. Weaver unsparingly diagnoses the ills of our age and offers a realistic remedy. He asserts that the world is intelligible, and that man is free. The catastrophes of our age are the product not of necessity but of unintelligent choice. A cure, he submits, is possible. It lies in the right use of man's reason, in the renewed acceptance of an absolute reality, and in the recognition that ideas—like actions—have consequences.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:36 -0400)

In this work, Richard M. Weaver diagnoses the ills of our age and offers a realistic remedy. He asserts that the world is intelligible, and that man is free. The catastrophes of our age are the product not of necessity but of unintelligent choice. A cure, he submits, is possible. It lies in the right use of man's reason, in the renewed acceptance of an absolute reality, and in the recognition that ideas--like actions--have consequences.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.35)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 4
3.5
4 12
4.5 4
5 26

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 127,167,988 books! | Top bar: Always visible