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Here is New York by E. B. White
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Here is New York (1949)

by E. B. White

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580817,036 (4.31)20
  1. 00
    The Owl Pen by Kenneth McNeill Wells (edwinbcn)
    edwinbcn: Both The Owl Pen by Kenneth McNeill Wells and Here is New York by E. B. White describe living on a farm in the countryside, with nostalgia for the old ways of living that were still around in the 1920s - 1950s, but came under pressure later in the century.
  2. 00
    Apple of My Eye by Helene Hanff (lilithcat)
    lilithcat: Another love story to New York!
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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
E.B. White paints the perfect picture of New York City. Akin to Kerouac did describing the Beat Community in the 1950's in On the Road, I felt the nostalgia for times I was never a part of. There was a quiet wistfulness in his prose. There was one paragraph where White talks about New York's destructibility that was prophetic, creepily so.

I loved it. My only complaint was the length. It was far too short. It only contributes to dream like quality. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
E.B. White paints the perfect picture of New York City. Akin to Kerouac did describing the Beat Community in the 1950's in On the Road, I felt the nostalgia for times I was never a part of. There was a quiet wistfulness in his prose. There was one paragraph where White talks about New York's destructibility that was prophetic, creepily so.

I loved it. My only complaint was the length. It was far too short. It only contributes to dream like quality. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
E.B. White paints the perfect picture of New York City. Akin to Kerouac did describing the Beat Community in the 1950's in On the Road, I felt the nostalgia for times I was never a part of. There was a quiet wistfulness in his prose. There was one paragraph where White talks about New York's destructibility that was prophetic, creepily so.

I loved it. My only complaint was the length. It was far too short. It only contributes to dream like quality. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
Brief, but breathtakingly brilliant ( )
  Faradaydon | Dec 31, 2011 |
Powerful short book that pulled me along from the first sentence all the way to be battered about the head near the end. Others have noted it in reviews, I believe maybe even on here. Noted the mention of the planes. And the destruction. The mention of how New Yorkers fear the planes, collapsing buildings, fire, destruction . . .

"burn the towers, crumble the bridges, turn the underground passages into lethal chambers, cremate the millions. The intimation of mortality is part of New York now" . . .

Again, this has been mentioned before. And I had known about it before I started. The book pulled me in, though, and I didn't remember, didn't recall then rushed into the death and destruction as the page turned. Of course the book is from 1949. The book actually ends with the building of the United Nations complex. Not the fall of the Twin Towers. And the planes, well the part I left out from the quote above shows how this destruction is feared to come about "[a] single flight of planes no bigger than a wedge of geese can quickly end this island fantasy..." The fear is bomber planes. Though planes flying into the Empire State building was mentioned in an earlier section.

A riveting book that pulled me in from beginning to end, a quick read read in one sitting. ( )
2 vote MikeBriggs | Jun 30, 2011 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0446388297, Paperback)

"On any person who desires such queer prizes, New York will bestow the gift of loneliness and the gift of privacy." So begins E.B. White's classic meditation on that noisiest, most public of American cities. Written during the summer of 1948, well after the author and editor had taken up permanent residence in Maine, Here Is New York is a fond glance back at the city of his youth, when White was one of the "young worshipful beginners" who give New York its passionate character. It's also a tribute to the sheer implausibility of the place--the tangled infrastructure, the teeming humanity, the dearth of air and light. Much has changed since White wrote this essay, yet in a city "both changeless and changing" there are things here that will doubtless ring equally true 100 years from now. To wit, "New Yorkers temperamentally do not crave comfort and convenience--if they did they would live elsewhere."

Anyone who's ever cherished his essays--or even Charlotte's Web--knows that White is the most elegant of all possible stylists. There's not a sentence here that does not make itself felt right down to the reader's very bones. What would the author make of Giuliani's New York? Or of Times Square, Disney-style? It's hard to say for sure. But not even Planet Hollywood could ruin White's abiding sense of wonder: "The city is like poetry: it compresses all life ... into a small island and adds music and the accompaniment of internal engines." This lovely new edition marks the 100th anniversary of E.B. White's birth--cause for celebration indeed. --Mary Park

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:45:42 -0400)

The author describes the sites and character of the city in 1949

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NYRB Classics

Two editions of this book were published by NYRB Classics.

Editions: 1892145022, 1590174798

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