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Paris in the Fifties by Stanley Karnow
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Paris in the Fifties

by Stanley Karnow

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Karnow, Stanley > Homes and haunts > France >/Paris/Paris (France) > Social life and customs > 20th/century/France > Politics and government > 1945-/National characteristics, French
  Budzul | Jun 1, 2008 |
4257 Paris in the Fifties, by Stanley Karnow (read 12 Jan 2007) Karnow in the 1950s was a correspondent in Paris, and this 1997 book tells of his time there. Most of the book is of much interest, though that he had to tell us of his masturbation and his time with a whore and his fornicating with the woman he eventually married I did not think added to the book's interest. Nor were his chapters on French food and French fashion of much interest to me. But he has excellent chapters on France's penal colony in South America, on the LeMans car crash on June 11, 1955 (83 dead, up to 100 wounded--but the race was completed nevertheless), on events in Morocco, Tunisia, and Algeria; and on Ho Chi Minh in Paris from 1917 to 1923 He writes very well, though there are no footnotes nor any bibliography, since it is a memoir, not a history. A well done interest-holding book ( )
  Schmerguls | Oct 28, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0812931378, Paperback)

Years before winning the Pulitzer Prize for his definitive history of the Vietnam War, Vietnam: A History, Stanley Karnow lived in Paris as a young reporter. The man who was later to be renowned for his thorough research and crisp prose had to begin somewhere, and Karnow had the incredible good fortune to make his way as a foreign correspondent for Time magazine in the 1950s. His original dispatches to Time's New York office make up a majority of Paris in the Fifties.

By simply calling this collection Paris in the Fifties, however, Karnow has done himself a great injustice. His treatise on the City of Light is more a biography of a city and its culture than it is a mere look at a time and place. Ever wonder where the modern-day restaurant had its origin, or what happened to the French aristocracy after the ravages of the Revolution, or even how the French maintain their status at the forefront of culture--be it food, wine, art, or fashion? Karnow provides the answers and then some. His descriptions are as rich as they are comprehensive, all the while depicting how the French savoir vivre--the zest for life that Paris symbolizes for all of us--withstood the horrors of World War II and the destabilization of society as everyone knew it. This wonderful book is reassurance that no matter what modern threats to culture may come, toujours Paris: we'll always have Paris. And that is true comfort to any expatriate at heart. --Courtenay Kehn

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:47:44 -0400)

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