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Gone by Michael Grant
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Gone (original 2009; edition 2009)

by Michael Grant

Series: Gone (1)

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2,2081472,940 (3.93)115
Member:mattlevin
Title:Gone
Authors:Michael Grant
Info:Katherine Tegen Books (2009), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 576 pages
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Gone by Michael Grant (2009)

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Showing 1-5 of 142 (next | show all)
In a small southern California coastal town, everyone over the age of 14 suddenly blips out of existence, leaving the children to form a new society in a confusing and dangerous world. A good book for the middle school crew, but I found it to be tiresome 2/5ths of the way through. Interesting premise with lots of surprises. ( )
  MzzArts | Aug 2, 2014 |
It was an ok book, in my opinion. It did not have very much action but in the last few chapters the pace picked up and it got interesting. I'll try reading the next book but I might not finish it. I would have put the book down before I finished it if I had known what the time at the start of each chapter was counting down too, but is the most exciting part at the end of the book. ( )
  siquebella | Jul 29, 2014 |
I think that Gone is a bit of a guilty pleasure novel for me. I did really enjoy reading it - far more than I thought I would - but I can't deny that it has some problems.

The story suffers from first novel syndrome, leaving so many loose ends and unanswered questions that it does not stand on its own as a story. The plot is also fairly predictable and a lot of the secondary cast members who seemed to be important at the start of the novel did not really get a lot of development.

However, the novel was certainly exciting and never felt bored reading it, even during its quiet sections. It does a very good job of setting out the ground rules for the world and therefore sets the stage for the rest of the series. I really hope that this means that the characters have more room to grow over the next few novels, as I think that this series really has promise to be something great ( )
  ArkhamReviews | Jul 8, 2014 |
My feelings about this book are proving hard to articulate, or even pin down.

Gone by Michael Grant

This is the first in a series of YA sci-fi novels set in the small town of Perdido Beach, where every person aged fifteen or older suddenly disappears one morning. In addition to facing basic questions of survival, the children of the “Fallout Alley Youth Zone” (or FAYZ) find themselves in a power-struggle complicated by some individuals’ development of super-human abilities. My feelings about this book are a bit tangled, so I’m going to try and use a list to make sense of them:

These books are described as both a sci-fi Lord of the Flies and Stephen King for kids. It does not have the believable psychology and slow transformation of a Lord of the Flies, the mounting horror as civilization leaves the boys one by one. The “bad” kids start bad and end that way, pretty much the same with the “good” or “heroic” kids. There is a lot of telling rather than showing with these characters. As to the Stephen King claim…Stephen King is Stephen King for kids. The stories are good no matter your age, and many of his novels and stories have protagonists as young (or younger) than these kids. A parallel might be drawn between some of the themes of good and evil, the premise (similar to Under the Dome in the first novel, blurbs for later novels indicate shades of It and The Stand). Rather weak tea, but I understand that marketing departments have books to sell.

I found it hard to relate to main character Sam, the “reluctant hero” of the tale. He felt like a cipher to me throughout the novel. I was told that he had feelings, longings and reservations, but I never felt them as a reader. Secondary characters like the very capable Edilio, cowardly Quinn and Astrid, and pragmatic Albert felt far more vivid to me. The book shone brightest in segments dealing with Lana, the exiled problem-child who finds herself alone and gravely injured in the desert.

I liked that some characters were allowed to be cowardly, and the recognition of the damage seemingly “courageous” acts can do when carried out by an emotionally sensitive person.
Fifteen is a weird age to disappear at. Perhaps this will be explained later in the series, but it just sort of sat in the back of my mind bugging me while I read. It seems like an age picked for convenience to the writer rather than logic.

The beginning progresses rather slowly, but after the arrival of the private-school kids things get crazier and crazier. This is good. When the crazy picked up (and the action with it), it became easier to get caught up in the story and ignore some of the weaker characterization/writing.

The people of Perdido Beach were not the only things affected by the event that spirited away the adults and granted others powers. This is another strong point of the novel.

In the end, I liked the story and am interested to know what happens to the denizens of the Fallout Alley Youth Zone, but I am reluctant to actually read more of Michael Grant’s writing. His ideas are aces, his execution is only okay. For others, I imagine it will be a matter of taste. If you are picky about writing, maybe not the story for you. If you can ignore clunky sentences and unearned character moments as long as there’s plenty of wild action, I couldn’t recommend this book more. ( )
  ArmchairAuthor | Jul 3, 2014 |
I walked into my book store looking for Insurgent, by Veronica Roth. I'd finished divergent and automatically went to my local BAM. Once there, I picked up insurgent and they had a buy one get one half off sale. I picked up GONE by Michael Grant, and let me tell you, I read the first five chapters IN LINE.

Once I plunged into this book I was unaware of what I was truly getting into. I thought it was just going to be a quick read that I wasn't going to care too much about. In fact, I wound up holding off on insurgent and went straight into GONE.

The main characters, Sam, Quinn, Edilio, Astrid, Little Pete, Albert, Lana, and Mary are what the first 100 pages consist of. They live in a small town in California and they are sitting in their small school, until poof. Gone. Their teachers disappear, parents, cops, and anyone else over 15. Without giving too much away, some kids from a "bad school", Coates Academy, show up in there town. These kids all start developing powers, disappearing at the age of 15, and they're running out if food. A dome forms over the town, focused on the towns power plant. People are dying. People are missing. Who's the biggest suspect of the faults in this? An autistic 4 year old with communication problems.

I give this book a 94 out of 100, and I'm plunging into the rest of this fantastic series. I can't say this about many series, but I wish there were less characters. That's about the only negative thing I have to say about this third-person narrated series. I highly recommend this book and most likely the rest of the series.
  joey_stacks_shelves | May 26, 2014 |
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Wat doe je als alle volwassenen spoorloos verdwenen zijn?
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For Katherine, Jake, and Julia
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One minute the teacher was talking about the Civil War. The next minute he was gone.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061448788, Paperback)

In the blink of an eye.

Everyone disappears.

Gone.

Everyone except for the young. Teens. Middle schoolers. Toddlers. But not a single adult. No teachers, no cops, no doctors, no parents. Gone, too, are the phones, internet, and television. There is no way to get help.

Hunger threatens. Bullies rule. A sinister creature lurks. Animals are mutating. And the teens themselves are changing, developing new talents—unimaginable, dangerous, deadly powers—that grow stronger by the day.

It's a terrifying new world. Sides are being chosen and war is imminent.

The first in a breathtaking saga about teens battling each other and their darkest selves, gone is a page-turning thriller that will make you look at the world in a whole new way.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:56:24 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

In a small town on the coast of California, everyone over the age of fourteen suddenly disappears, setting up a battle between the remaining town residents and the students from a local private school, as well as those who have "The Power" and are able to perform supernatural feats and those who do not.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

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