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Enduring Love by Ian McEwan

Enduring Love (1997)

by Ian McEwan

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4,544751,055 (3.68)207
  1. 10
    Heading Out to Wonderful by Robert Goolrick (Limelite)
    Limelite: Both are literary love stories. Both spiral into violence.
  2. 10
    The Reader by Bernhard Schlink (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: The Reader could be successfully paired with Enduring Love for English Studies. In addition either book could also be be paired with the film The Talented Mr Ripley under the theme of obsession or even Border Crossing by Pat Barker

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English (66)  Dutch (2)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (1)  Polish (1)  Hungarian (1)  Hebrew (1)  German (1)  All languages (75)
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
Aangrijpend verhaal van het begin tot eind. Over wetenschapsjournalist Joe en Keats-onderzoeker en universitair docent Clarissa. Over hun verborgen emoties waartegen logica en ratio niet bestand zijn. Als het er op aan komt drijven Joe en Rose uit elkaar omdat ze op het moment dat het er echt toe doet, elkaar niet kunnen steunen in hun gevoel. Een ijzersterke passage: "no one could agree on anything. We lived in a mist of half-shared, unreliable perception, and our sense data came warped by a prism of desire and belief, which tilted our memories too. We saw and remembered in our own favour and we persuaded ourselves alont the way. Pitiless objectivity especially abour ourselves was always a doomed social strategy. We're descended from the indignant passionate tellers of half truths who in order to convince others simultaneously convinced ourselves. Over generations success has winnowed us out and with success came our defect, carved deep in the genes, like ruts in a cart-track when it didn't suit us we couldn't agree on what was in front of us. Believing is seeing" (...). ( )
  timswings | Oct 4, 2015 |
Fantastic beginning, impressive pace, great structure, strong, wonderful writing, interesting emotions and several more or less estranged characters. How easy it is to disturb thing, how readily a relationship gets off course, how fickle is life's substance. Or was a disaster inevitable to start with?
Far back in some nasal cave, chance had fashioned out of mucus two-note panpipes, and we were forced to listen. ( )
  flydodofly | Sep 2, 2015 |
The beginning of the book, the opening chapter showed promise. In fact I was pulled in right away and was looking forward to the rest of the book. It had a lot going for it, lovely writing and interesting premise. The it fell apart, and the book became a chore to finish. The characters in the book just didn't do it for me, the main protagonist bothered be to the point I nearly gave up on the book, multiple times. His tangents and observations took away from the story and I found it to be very disruptive to the rest of the plot. I also found the ending to be rather anti-climatic.

In the end, the book just didn't work out for me.

Also found on my book review blog Jules' Book Reviews - Enduring Love ( )
  bookwormjules | Aug 23, 2015 |
I just can't. Maybe if I hadn't been stalked myself, I could, but I have, and so I can't.
  annadanz | Jul 5, 2015 |
One of my all time favourites. A masterclass of writing and storytelling. What a great, imaginative story. Loved it. He even subtly wove in some witty in-joke references to the craft of writing (eg the crucible).
[Not a spoiler, so fear not:]
Interesting thing is that the film rendered a much improved climax. It obviated the need for the awkward and unnecessary earlier episode of obtaining a certain 'means of self-defence', which was the only (slight) flaw in the whole book.
If I were McEwan, I'd have kicked myself silly at seeing the better film rendering of the climax.
Still a brilliant, brilliant book, though, and I heartily recommend it. ( )
  MatthewJamesHunt | Jun 5, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
Ian McEwan's reputation as a writer of small, impeccably written fictions is secure. His gift for the cold and scary is well established, too: among the critical praise that festoons his book jackets, the word "macabre" crops up more than once. But his books are more than tales of suspense and shock; they raise issues of guilt and love and fear, essentially of what happens when the civilized and ordered splinters against chaos.
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The beginning is simple to mark.
When it's gone, you'll know what a gift love was.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0385494149, Paperback)

Joe Rose has planned a postcard-perfect afternoon in the English countryside to celebrate his lover's return after six weeks in the States. To complete the picture, there's even a "helium balloon drifting dreamily across the wooded valley." But as Joe and Clarissa watch the balloon touch down, their idyll comes to an abrupt end. The pilot catches his leg in the anchor rope, while the only passenger, a boy, is too scared to jump down. As the wind whips into action, Joe and four other men rush to secure the basket. Mother Nature, however, isn't feeling very maternal. "A mighty fist socked the balloon in two rapid blows, one-two, the second more vicious than the first," and at once the rescuers are airborne. Joe manages to drop to the ground, as do most of his companions, but one man is lifted sky-high, only to fall to his death.

In itself, the accident would change the survivors' lives, filling them with an uneasy combination of shame, happiness, and endless self-reproach. (In one of the novel's many ironies, the balloon eventually lands safely, the boy unscathed.) But fate has far more unpleasant things in store for Joe. Meeting the eye of fellow rescuer Jed Parry, for example, turns out to be a very bad move. For Jed is instantly obsessed, making the first of many calls to Joe and Clarissa's London flat that very night. Soon he's openly shadowing Joe and writing him endless letters. (One insane epistle begins, "I feel happiness running through me like an electrical current. I close my eyes and see you as you were last night in the rain, across the road from me, with the unspoken love between us as strong as steel cable.") Worst of all, Jed's version of love comes to seem a distortion of Joe's feelings for Clarissa.

Apart from the incessant stalking, it is the conditionals--the contingencies--that most frustrate Joe, a scientific journalist. If only he and Clarissa had gone straight home from the airport... If only the wind hadn't picked up... If only he had saved Jed's 29 messages in a single day... Ian McEwan has long been a poet of the arbitrary nightmare, his characters ineluctably swept up in others' fantasies, skidding into deepening violence, and--worst of all--becoming strangers to those who love them. Even his prose itself is a masterful and methodical exercise in defamiliarization. But Enduring Love and its underrated predecessor, Black Dogs, are also meditations on knowledge and perception as well as brilliant manipulations of our own expectations. By the novel's end, you will be surprisingly unafraid of hot-air balloons, but you won't be too keen on looking a stranger in the eye.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:02 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

The bestselling author of "The Innocent" spins a tale of life intruded upon. After attempting to rescue a child from a runaway hot-air balloon, Joe Rose finds himself part of a living nightmare of suspicion and obsession.

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