HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town…
Loading...

The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town America (1989)

by Bill Bryson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Bill Bryson's Travels (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,2731081,259 (3.67)89
  1. 20
    Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck (John_Vaughan)
  2. 10
    American Gods by Neil Gaiman (rockhopper_penguin)
    rockhopper_penguin: I read these two books one after another. It wasn't a deliberate decision, but the two did seem to work well together. The books visit a few of the same places, and it's interesting to note how differently they are portrayed in each.
  3. 10
    Population: 485 by Michael Perry (bnbookgirl)
  4. 00
    The Small Town in American Literature by David M. Cook (RedEyedNerd)
    RedEyedNerd: 26 American works published between the 1870s and the 1960s. Poems and short stories in full length, novels as excerpts. They share the small town setting as an essential ingredient. Editor's headnotes on the small town aspect of every work.
  5. 00
    If You Lived Here, I'd Know Your Name: News from Small-Town Alaska by Heather Lende (bnbookgirl)
    bnbookgirl: most enjoyable
  6. 00
    The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World by Eric Weiner (Othemts)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 89 mentions

English (103)  Dutch (1)  German (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Italian (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (108)
Showing 1-5 of 103 (next | show all)
I can seethe appeal of Bill Bryson - he writes with a flair of capturing the feeling of traveling - the boredom, the disappointment of attraction not living up to expectations, while capturing the joy of being on the road, going from place to place. Its an interesting dichotomy and this novel captures it perfectly.

Ultimately, I found the book to be dated. No cell phones, off color jokes best left to 20 years ago. But the author is equally critical of everybody. I'm glad I read it- it gave me flashbacks of traveling with my family to Yellowstone and Mount Rushmore, when I was a kid. ( )
  TheDivineOomba | Mar 7, 2019 |
'I come from Des Moines. Somebody had to'

And, as soon as Bill Bryson was old enough, he left. Des Moines couldn't hold him, but it did lure him back. After ten years in England, he returned to the land of his youth, and drove almost 14,000 miles in search of a mythical small town called Amalgam, the kind of trim and sunny place where the films of his youth were set. Instead, his search led him to Anywhere, USA; a lookalike strip of gas stations, motels and hamburger outlets populated by lookalike people with a penchant for synthetic fibres. Travelling around thirty-eight of the lower states - united only in their mind-numbingly dreary uniformity - he discovered a continent that was doubly lost; lost to itself because blighted by greed, pollution, mobile homes and television; lost to him because he had become a stranger in his own land.

The Lost Continent is a classic of travel literature - hilariously, stomach-achingly funny, yet tinged with heartache - and the book that first staked Bill Bryson's claim as the most beloved writer of his generation. ( )
  jepeters333 | Feb 16, 2019 |
This is the first Bryson book I have read, and I was a little concerned by the bad reviews. However, now I have read it I can see both sides. Despite the book being about 25yrs old and I've never visited the States, it is as I imagine it. The south is depicted on TV as it is written in the book, and the differences between the states in terms of attitude is well discussed. I can see why people have taken offence, but no place is without its bad points, and these should be recognised too.

Not the best review I've written, but you get the picture...worth a read despite being quite an old book! ( )
  peelap | Feb 3, 2019 |
loved it. ( )
  cfulton20 | Dec 5, 2018 |
loved it. ( )
  cfulton20 | Dec 5, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 103 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Bryson, Billprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Schalekamp, JeanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To my father
First words
I come from Des Moines.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary
he drives through the states,
acts miserable,
eating junk and talking shit.

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0060920084, Paperback)

A travelogue by Bill Bryson is as close to a sure thing as funny books get. The Lost Continent is no exception. Following an urge to rediscover his youth (he should know better), the author leaves his native Des Moines, Iowa, in a journey that takes him across 38 states. Lucky for us, he brought a notebook.

With a razor wit and a kind heart, Bryson serves up a colorful tale of boredom, kitsch, and beauty when you least expect it. Gentler elements aside, The Lost Continent is an amusing book. Here's Bryson on the women of his native state: "I will say this, however--and it's a strange, strange thing--the teenaged daughters of these fat women are always utterly delectable ... I don't know what it is that happens to them, but it must be awful to marry one of those nubile cuties knowing that there is a time bomb ticking away in her that will at some unknown date make her bloat out into something huge and grotesque, presumably all of a sudden and without much notice, like a self-inflating raft from which the pin has been yanked."

Yes, Bill, but be honest: what do you really think?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:34 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

When a native of Iowa returns from England to wander across America's heartland in search of the perfect small town, the result is a string of hilarious anecdotes and biting social commentary

» see all 15 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5 3
1 24
1.5 10
2 70
2.5 21
3 318
3.5 94
4 450
4.5 24
5 219

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 134,159,930 books! | Top bar: Always visible