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A Rumor of War by Philip Caputo
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A Rumor of War (original 1977; edition 1996)

by Philip Caputo

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1,501167,326 (3.97)46
Member:corybruner31
Title:A Rumor of War
Authors:Philip Caputo
Info:Holt Paperbacks (1996), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 356 pages
Collections:Your library
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A Rumor of War by Philip Caputo (1977)

Recently added byJouissens, WolverineTim, LicataMalia, private library, endaclon, phstitans, Mandane75, HallieOzzy
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Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Awesome. Spellbinding. Frightening. Such is the war memoir A Rumor of War by Philip Caputo who served in Vietnam as a young lad in 1965. As someone who has never been in the army let alone war this memoir is an eye opener, albeit a frightening one. I don't recall being opposed to the Vietnam War at the time as many were. I think I may have supported it while knowing almost nothing about it. Such a moral conflict for our young conscientious American men who were put in an impossible situation. Having read this memoir I now know that the war was wrong and too many of our young resources gave their lives for no justifiable reason. This book is important and I urge you to read it. I have been moved by it and disgusted by the facts. ( )
  SigmundFraud | Nov 9, 2017 |
I think I have read this back in the eighties; but I am not sure. But reading it [again] was no hardship. This is certainly one of the masterpieces to emerge from the Vietnam War. The core of the book takes place in the early days of the war, when the US troops move from advisors to combatants. It tells simply and clearly of the horror and fascination of war through the eyes of a naive junior officer. The writing style is very clear and uncluttered and, although I often shuddered, I enjoyed the read. The story is in the core of the book, but I urge everyone to read the prologue and the epilogue. These are brillantly set out thoughts on why the US were there in the first place [despite the French experience and the massive corruption] and then why it all went wrong. As I said a masterpiece! ( )
  johnwbeha | Sep 8, 2016 |
4 ★

This is the story of Marine Lieutenant Philip J. Caputo who landed at Danang (March 1965) with the first ground combat unit deployed to Vietnam.
The story is his and the men with whom he fought.

An overview says it better than I.
"Upon it's publication in 1977, it shattered America’s indifference to the fate of the men sent to fight in the jungles of Vietnam.

Although I wasn't totally immersed in L. J. Ganser as reader,please realize that it was just my personal preference.
-----

“Every war seems to find its own voice: Caputo . . . is an eloquent spokesman for all we lost in Vietnam.”—C. D. B. Bryan, Saturday Review ( )
  pennsylady | Jan 31, 2016 |
As a marine, Philip Caputo was in one of the first groups of U.S. troops to arrive in Vietnam in 1965 at the beginning of the war. He served there for a year. In 1975 he returned as a journalist and was in one of the last groups to be evacuated from Saigon before the city fell to the North Vietnamese. This book talks about his personal experiences in Vietnam as he remembers them.

Caputo is definitely candid and doesn't seem to hold anything back. It's absolutely a powerful book, although not the type of book that you can really enjoy reading. Obviously the atrocities committed by both the Vietnamese and American soldiers are disturbing to read about. It's fairly well written, and definitely something that most people would benefit from reading. ( )
  AmandaL. | Jan 16, 2016 |
Along with Herr's Dispatches, this has got to be the best book about Vietnam ever written. ( )
  LJMax | Aug 21, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 080504695X, Paperback)

The classic Vietnam memoir, as relevant today as it was almost thirty years ago.

In March of 1965, Marine Lieutenent Philip J. Caputo landed at Da Nang with the first ground combat unit deployed to Vietnam. Sixteen months later, having served on the line in one of modern history's ugliest wars, he returned home--physically whole but emotionally wasted, his youthful idealism forever gone.
A Rumor of War is more than one soldier's story. Upon its publication in 1977, it shattered America's indifference to the fate of the men sent to fight in the jungles of Vietnam. In the years since then, it has become not only a basic text on the Vietnam War but also a renowned classic in the literature of wars throughout history and, as Caputo explains, of "the things men do in war and the things war does to men."

"A singular and marvelous work." --The New York Times



(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:19 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

In March of 1965, Marine Lieutenant Philip J. Caputo landed at Danang with the first ground combat unit committed to fight in Vietnam. Sixteen months later, having served on the line in one of modern history's ugliest wars, he returned home--physically whole, emotionally wasted, his youthful idealism shattered. A decade later, Caputo would write in A Rumor of War, "This is simply a story about war, about the things men do in war and the things war does to them." It was far more than that. It was, as Theodore Solotaroff wrote in The New York Times Book Review, "the troubled conscience of America speaking passionately, truthfully, finally." It was the book that shattered America's deliberate indifference to the fate of the men it sent to fight in the jungles of Vietnam, and in the years since it was first published it has become a basic text on that war. But in the literature of war that stretches back to Homer, it has also taken its place as an esteemed classic. As William Broyles--himself a decorated Marine veteran of Vietnam--wrote in Texas Monthly, "Not since Siegfried Sassoon's classic of World War I, Memoirs of an Infantry Officer, has there been a war memoir so obviously true, and so disturbingly honest."… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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