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Psychiatry and Religion: The Convergence of…
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Psychiatry and Religion: The Convergence of Mind and Spirit (Issues in…

by James K. Boehnlein, M.D.

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0880489200, Hardcover)

Psychiatry and religion both draw on the rich traditions of human thought and practice. The ways in which humans attempt to understand and interact with their world and give meaning to their lives have occupied philosophers, religious leaders, and scientists for centuries. Psychiatry is unique among the medical sciences in that, as it attempts to explain the full range of human behavior, it often ranges well beyond the realm of natural science and into that of philosophy. To deal with contemporary ethical issues, psychiatrists must be able to draw on a broad intellectual tradition not only in the biological sciences, but also in the humanities and social sciences, which encompass the comparative study of religion. Psychiatry and Religion addresses both the polarities and the unifying concepts between psychiatry and religion, with a unique focus on the point at which these two domains meet. Divided into three parts, this scholarly yet eminently readable volume considers both theoretical and clinical issues and includes topics rarely discussed elsewhere in the literature: -Part I: Theoretical Principles and Historical TrendsACovers both historical and current cross-cultural perspectives of psychiatry and the major religions, including a close look at cults -Part II: Treatment Issues at the Interface of Psychiatry and ReligionADiscusses the influence of religious movements on psychiatric therapies, the moral and spiritual issues in the wake of traumatic experiences, and the separate yet complementary roles of mental health practitioners and clergy in restoring patients to health -Part III: Looking Toward the FutureAConsiders bioethics, religious and spiritual issues in psychiatric education and training, and religion and future psychiatric nosology and treatment Written by clinicians and educators, this fascinating book fills a significant gap in the literature by providing a much-needed sociological and cross-cultural perspective of theory and practice at the interface of where psychiatry and religion. As more and more psychiatry training programs and medical schools begin to include courses on religion and spirituality, psychiatric educators and practitioners alike will find this book to be a valuable resource.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:45 -0400)

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