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The Twilight Streets by Gary Russell
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The Twilight Streets

by Gary Russell

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Several of my friends regularly watch/watched Dr Who and Torchwood. I managed to never get into Torchwood when it was on the air. I was familiar with the characters and concepts due to catching bits and pieces of the show or hearing friends discuss some point or other. I'm more of a reader than TV watcher, so I started reading this series as I was interested enough to see what it was all about. At first, I had assumed the novels would just retell the events from the TV show, but these are totally different stories. The books do occasionally touch on stuff that happened in the show as the events they portray sort of happen between episodes. After reading the first 12 novels in this series, I actually went back and watched the whole show, too, since I liked the characters so much. ( )
  ktlavender | Jul 17, 2017 |
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1826751.html

Really a rather good Torchwood novel, taking Bilis Manger from the end of the first season and Idris from the Who episode Boom Town, and also an alternate timeline which foreshadows a lot of future developments (blowing up the Hub, leaving Gwen, Rhys and their baby as the sole survivors of Torchwood). To a large extent it's a sequel to the episode End of Days, but much better. Lots of good character moments and exploration of what it means to be inside their skins. I must say that the Torchwood novels are proving generally rather a cut above the usual Who range; it's a shame that tie-in works get so little critical attention. ( )
  nwhyte | Oct 2, 2011 |
Sixth of the Torchwood tie-in novels, set late in second season and with a lot of canon references. And my most favourite of all the canon references is the return of Idris Hopper, the Mayor's secretary from the Doctor Who episode Boom Town. :-)

There is a small block of streets in Cardiff, built by a Victorian businessman as model housing for his workforce. And never occupied for more than a few weeks at a time. Things happen to the people who try to live in Tretarri. Jack doesn't know why, because Jack can't get in. He gets a three day migraine every time he tries. But now the Council is renovating the block, with full-on gentrification and street parties to show off the results. Not just on the rate-payers' money, either -- private sponsorship is paying for the celebrations. But the block becomes more than a minor mystery for Jack's off-duty hours when it becomes apparent that Bilis Manger is behind the plans for change. And Bilis is still using visions of the future to prod the team into action.

It seems simple enough. Another round of stop Bilis Manger and save the world. But the old man's relationship with Good and Evil is rather more complex than that...

Really enjoyed this one. It's got an interesting plot, some excellent character development, and entertaining interactions between the various characters. All the regular characters get some page space, and there's some good stuff on the Jack/Ianto, Gwen/Rhys and Tosh-Owen relationships. Also a delightful little scene in which Ianto tells Torchwood's Little Miss Sensitive (yes, he calls Gwen that) some home truths about what it's really like to be bisexual. :-> There's a lot of stuff referring back to canon, but most of it is tied into the story in such a way that it enhances the story for those who've seen the episodes without excluding those who haven't. It also includes a good in-universe explanation for why the Tardis crew didn't encounter Torchwood during the events of Boom Town (the external reason, of course, being that Torchwood the series was still a twinkle in RTD's eye at the time). The reason for the AU future's potential existence got a bit woolly in places, but the story in that timeline is really well done, if possibly over-angsty for some fans. Which is why I liked it, of course. :-)

Oh, and a word of praise for cover artist Lee Binding, who has done a lovely job in depicting some key elements of the story. ( )
  JulesJones | May 22, 2011 |
Out of all the Torchwood Novels, this is my absolute favorite so far. Very in character and an intriguing storyline! ( )
  jaybird023 | Jan 31, 2010 |
I think this book is a good continuation of the Toorchwood series but unfortunatly Toshiko and Owen are susposed to be dead
  Lindsaybooklist | Oct 10, 2008 |
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He counted eighteen of them, on the platform in their neat little black or grey mackintoshes, caps on their heads, gas masks on their belts, some clutching rope-bound suitcases, some just satchels, a few others nothing more than paper bags.
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Captain Jack Harkness, Gwen, Owen, Tosh and Ianto are a close-knit team of investigators solving alien and human crimes as they delve into the underworld of modern day Cardiff.

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