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The timetables of history : a chronology of…
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The timetables of history : a chronology of world events (original 1946; edition 1975)

by Bernard Grun, Werner Stein

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2,677163,302 (4)12
Member:HartHouseLibrary
Title:The timetables of history : a chronology of world events
Authors:Bernard Grun
Other authors:Werner Stein
Info:London : Thames and Hudson, 1975.
Collections:REF (Reference)
Rating:
Tags:REF GRU

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The Timetables of History by Bernard Grun (1946)

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» See also 12 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
Vast and absorbing, spanning millennia of human history, The Timetables of History, achieves a goal in the study of the past that is unmatched by any other reference volume -- it gives us a sweeping overview of the making of the contemporary world. This remarkable book maps out at a glance what was happening simultaneously, from the dawn of history to the present day. Never before has progress been presented with such clarity or ( )
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  Tutter | Dec 31, 2014 |
The early years of human history seem to have less information than might be available, particularly spotty in Asian history and pretty much nothing about Africa south of the Sahara. Still, an interesting browse and a good place to see what was happening in a given year. ( )
  auntieknickers | Jun 4, 2011 |
The kind of master-reference that was once very luxurious and impressive--a triumph, says Arthur Schlesinger (!) on the back cover--but has been in some ways well and truly superseded by the internet. You don't need this to look up dates anymore, but there is absolutely still some fascination in the cascade of names, events, facts, across the page--a synaesthetic smorgasbord. The best way to read this, then, is to start at the start and flip pages slowly, scanning the page but not too thoroughly, magpieing. The ancient world had a lot more "history and politics" than any of the other categories--just this sort of aggregate reminder about how much of the past is lost, and how mixed up humans can be about what's important for the ages. The change to individual year numbering at the start of the middle ages, 500 CE, and the total lack of much for most of the first 500 years or so--a reminder that you can push back to a certain degree against the "Dark Ages" cliche, stress continuities with Rome and active and vital cultural practices, but it was still a shitty and muddy and squalid time with a whole lot less going on than the before it or after it--and then the further observation that this is Eurocentric in a way that would not have been possible even, oh, ten years later (my edition is from the early '90s I believe). The different ways we evaluate the arts--literature with a canon that shifts in the weirdest ways but a constant sense of itself as high art; music as a classical preserve (and in terms of what we know, the youngest of the arts) with pop singers only grudgingly and comically admitted ("1968: Aretha Franklin ("soul" music) and Jimi Hendrix (hard rock music) joust for popularity"). Visual art as just dying out, dude--great works outnumbered basically every year past 1950 by deaths of those who produced great works in an earlier age. (Why haven't we canonized our computer graphics guys, our design men, our animators?) 1650: The first coffee house opens in London; and, tea is first drunk in the British Isles. There is some fun here. ( )
2 vote MeditationesMartini | Oct 11, 2010 |
I'd be lying if I said that I read this book, but it is an interesting reference to peruse from time to time. ( )
1 vote Diwanna | Aug 3, 2010 |
Book Description: New York, U.S.A.: A Touchstone Book, 1982. Soft Cover. Very Good. First Printing. 4to - over 9" - 12" tall.
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  Czrbr | Jun 7, 2010 |
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Grun, Bernardprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brockway, Wallacemain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stein, Wernermain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boorstin, DanielForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Book description
Vast and absorbing, spanning millennia of human history, The Timetables of History, achieves a goal in the study of the past that is unmatched by any other reference volume -- it gives us a sweeping overview of the making of the contemporary world. This remarkable book maps out at a glance what was happening simultaneously, from the dawn of history to the present day. Never before has progress been presented with such clarity or with a view that fully captures the essence and the excitement of civilization.
Completely updated, featuring:

* Recent breakthroughs in science and technology

* New achievements in the visual arts and music

* Milestones in religion, philosophy, and learning

* The rise and fall of nations and the emergence of historic figures

* Landmarks in the drama of daily life
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 067174271X, Paperback)

Vast and absorbing, spanning millennia of human history, "The Timetables of History," achieves a goal in the study of the past that is unmatched by any other reference volume -- it gives us a sweeping overview of the making of the contemporary world. This remarkable book maps out at a glance what was happening "simultaneously," from the dawn of history to the present day. Never before has progress been presented with such clarity or with a view that fully captures the essence and the excitement of civilization.

Completely updated, featuring:

* Recent breakthroughs in science and technology

* New achievements in the visual arts and music

* Milestones in religion, philosophy, and learning

* The rise and fall of nations and the emergence of historic figures

* Landmarks in the drama of daily life

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:45 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

The classic history reference, brought completely up to date, linking more than 30,000 events in an overview of 7,000 years of civilization. The Timetables of History is an indispensable resource that distills the essence of civilization, highlighting significant moments in history, politics, philosophy, religion, art, science and technology. 2 color throughout. Vast and absorbing, spanning millennia of human history, The Timetables of History, achieves a goal in the study of the past that is unmatched by any other reference volume -- it gives us a sweeping overview of the making of the contemporary world. This remarkable book maps out at a glance what was happening simultaneously, from the dawn of history to the present day. Never before has progress been presented with such clarity or with a view that fully captures the essence and the excitement of civilization.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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