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The Buddha's Diamonds by Carolyn Marsden
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The Buddha's Diamonds

by Carolyn Marsden

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Tinh, a Vietnamese boy, is proud to help his father with the fishing but when a terrible storm hits, he runs from the big waves instead of making sure the boat is safe. He feels ashamed and tries his best to make up for his mistake.
This book is based on a true story and is an endearing story of a boy’s struggle to become a man. It offers a vivid depiction of Vietnamese peasant life and would suit children 10 years and up who are interested in learning about other countries and cultures. ( )
  RefPenny | Nov 8, 2010 |
This is an endearing story of a boys struggle to transition from a child to one who can help with the family business of fishing. Tinh is a 10 hear old boy living in a small fishing village in postwar Vietnam. He would really like to play soccer with his friends and fly a kite with his sister, but also sees the value of helping his father with the fishing. A storm engulfs his village and his father leaves him in charge of securing their new bamboo boat. Tinh runs from the beach in fear of the huge waves, failing to secure the boat. In the aftermath of the storm Tinh and his father find their boat wrecked and at the bottom of a pile of other boats. After a wait they are able to get to the boat and begin repairs.

This story is based on a true story about coming to terms with a spiritual awareness is the midst of a terrible natural disaster.

Curricular Connection:

This is a great book to use in introducing a new culture, post-war conditions and the Buddhist values.
  evotru2010 | Jul 19, 2010 |
Nice enough story

about fishing family

and growing up poor.
  librarianlk | Jul 15, 2008 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0763633801, Hardcover)

After a storm engulfs his village, a Vietnamese boy has glimmers of a new calling in this spare middle-grade novel written with authenticity and grace.

Every day, Tinh heads out to sea with his father to catch fish for their family and the market. While he sometimes misses flying kites with other children on the beach, Tinh is proud to work alongside Ba. Then a fierce storm strikes, and Ba entrusts Tinh to secure the family vessel, but the boy panics and runs away. It will take courage and faith to salvage the bamboo boat, win back Ba’s confidence, and return to sea. This graceful tale narrates a young Vietnamese boy’s literal and spiritual coming-of-age.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:40:31 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

As a storm sweeps in, Tinh's father tells him to tie up their fishing boat but the storm scares him and he runs away, but when the damage to the boat is discovered, Tinh realizes what he must do.

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Candlewick Press

Two editions of this book were published by Candlewick Press.

Editions: 0763633801, 0763648280

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