HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Death with Interruptions by Jose Saramago
Loading...

Death with Interruptions (original 2005; edition 2009)

by Jose Saramago

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,737674,076 (3.67)46
Member:ghimmelmann
Title:Death with Interruptions
Authors:Jose Saramago
Info:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2009), Edition: Reprint, Kindle Edition, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work details

Death with Interruptions by José Saramago (2005)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 46 mentions

English (55)  Dutch (4)  Spanish (4)  French (2)  Italian (1)  German (1)  All languages (67)
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
Edit Marzo 2015

Todavía sigo acordandome de lo excelente que es este libro... sobre todo entre tanta cosa mala/regular que vengo leyendo XD



EDIT: 4/11/2014

Aprobéeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!!!! En diciembre empiezo el desafío Saramago que me propuse: cinco libro a leer antes de marzo!

FELICIDAD!!!!!! Lluvia de corazones para todos!!


EDIT: 31/10/2014

Cuanto más pienso en este libro, más me doy cuenta de lo genial que es: Gracioso, realista (lo más realista que se puede ser en un tema completamente fantástico), con humor irónico y sarcástico. Una maravilla realmente.

Ayer mientas estudiaba y repasaba los temas tratados, me reía en voz alta con los diálogos disparatados pero brutalmente honestos (sobre todo los religiosos felicitandose entre ellos cuando la muerte vuelve operar como antes, diciendose que había sido su cadena de oración la que había traído la normalidad nuevamente; así como también la muerte y sus interacciones con su guadaña, entre muchas más escenas imperdibles) .

Con gusto recopilaría todas las partes graciosas para que entiendan la genialidad de la que hablo...pero no quiero arruinarles la sorpresa. Sepan nada más que el humor en maravilloso.

Juro solemnemente que si apruebo el parcial de hoy gracias a este libro, me voy a proponer un desafío José Saramago, donde me prometo leer al menos cinco de sus libros antes de marzo del 2015.

SI APRUEBO NOMÁS. Si me va mal, no los toco ni en la pantalla de la tablet jajaja.


RESEÑA ORIGINAL: 28/10/214

Dear sir, she wrote, I am not Death, but death, Death is something of which you could never even conceive, and please note, mister grammarian, that I did not conclude that phrase with a preposition, you human beings only know the small everyday death that is me, the death which, even in the very worst disasters, is incapable of preventing life from continuing, one day you will find out about Death with a capital D, and at that moment, in the unlikely event that she gives you time to do so, you will understand the real difference between the relative and the absolute, between full and empty, between still alive and no longer alive, and when I say real difference, I am referring to something that mere words will never be able to express, relative, absolute, full, empty, still alive and no longer alive, because, sir, in case you don't know it, words move, they change from one day to the next, they are as unstable as shadows, are themselves shadows, which both are and have ceased to be, soap bubbles, shells in which one can barely hear a whisper, mere tree stumps, I give you this information gratis and for free, meanwhile, concern yourself with explaining to your readers the whys and wherefores of life and death, and now, returning to the original purpose of this letter, written, as was the one read out on television, by my own hand, I ask you to fulfill the provisions contained in the press regulations which demand that any error, omission or mistake be rectified on the same page and in the same font size, and if this letter is not published in full, sir, you run the risk of receiving tomorrow morning, with immediate effect, the prior warning that I was reserving for you in a few years' time, although, so as not to ruin the rest of your life, I won't say exactly how many, yours faithfully, death.

Muy interesante, aunque más entretenida (para mi mente saturada de parciales amontonados uno atrás de otro), la segunda parte.


( )
  LaMala | Jun 7, 2015 |
Near perfect. This was a challenging and sophisticated novel that I might normally have found pretentious except Saramago blends just the right amount of humor and poignancy to keep it grounded and engaging.

The story is split into two parts. In the first, death (yes, with a small "d") takes a holiday. In a small, unnamed European country, no one dies for several months. The narrator tells us what this means - for ordinary people, for the government, for the undertakers and insurance companies, etc. It's a kind of meta-narrative, where the few "characters" are unnamed - the prime minister, the king, the head of state television. It's very theoretical and cerebral.

And then Saramago changes gear, focuses in on death herself as a character and her relationship with one individual who is supposed to die. It's a beautiful and bittersweet second part of the novel that raised the book to a near 5-star read for me. For all of the focus on death as the main driver in the novel, it is really about life and what it means to live and to live well and meaningfully.

I am so pleased I stuck with this one. It was a rewarding read. ( )
3 vote katiekrug | Apr 28, 2015 |
READ IN DUTCH

A few months ago I read Saramago’s dystopian book Blindness. Someone recommended to me another of his novels, and as I was intrigued by the story I really wanted to read it.
It starts when suddenly no one dies anymore in an unnamed country probably somewhere in Europe. This isn't as good as people first expect because people may die no longer, but they still get seriously ill, get car accidents et cetera.
It wasn’t really what I expected, though I did like it. The story is very ‘cold’, as the point is to tell us what happened after people stopped dying. It’s mostly a summation of situations where we are told how specific people react to them. Like for example, what the doctors should do with all the patients who will never recover nor die? This makes that the book almost reads as a report.
( )
  Floratina | Jan 4, 2015 |
Con la solita eleganza di linguaggio e pensiero, ineguagliati che io sappia da altri, S. riesce ad affrontare una ipotesi semplice, ma abusata, e difficile da gestire, e lo fa con leggerezza sorridente, così come noi ci troviamo ad essere, leggeri e sorridenti nel leggere le avventure di un mondo che *mai* sarà, ma che piacerebbe che fosse, almeno nella prima e nell'ultima delle ipotesi. Una incantevole prova da affiancare a 'Death' (N. Gaiman), che parla di argomenti simili ma lo fa con la propria cadenza, assai diversa da quella del letterato portoghese, che tuttavia completa un argomento sul quale sarà difficile leggere qualcosa di completamente nuovo - a meno di non affacciarsi a testi più sensazionalistici o medici, come ad esempio 'Stecchiti', (M. Roach). ( )
  bobparr | Dec 14, 2014 |
Interesting premise, drags a bit when focused on the government response to Death's diappearance, then perks up when Death reappears. ( )
  AThurman | Dec 7, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
José Saramagoprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Costa, Margaret JuliTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gauld, TomCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kort, Maartje deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rio, Pilar delTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Portuguese (Portugal) Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
We will know less and less what it means to be human.
- Book of Predictions
If, for example, you were to think more deeply about death, then it would be truly strange if, in so doing, you did not encounter new images, new linguistic fields.
- Wittgenstein
Saberemos cada vez menos o que é um ser humano.
Dedication
For Pilar, my home.
First words
The following day, no one died.
No dia seguinte ninguém morreu.
Quotations
This fact, being absolutely contrary to life's rules, provoked enormous, and in the circumstances, perfectly justifiable anxiety in people's minds, for we have only to consider that in the entire forty volumes of universal history there is no mention, not even one exemplary case, of such a phenomenon ever having occurred, for a whole day to go by, with its generous allowance of twenty-four hours, diurnal and nocturnal, matutinal and vespertine, without one death from an illness, a fatal fall, or a successful suicide, not one, not a single one.
At most, it might push them toward the place where death presumably was, but it would be pointless, futile, because at that precise moment, as unreachable as ever, she would take a step back and keep her distance.
One cannot be too careful with words, they change their minds just as people do.
By the way, we feel we must mention that death, by herself and alone, with no external help, has always killed far less than mankind has.
it makes no difference because everything will have but one ending, the ending that a part of yourself will always have to think about and which is the black stain on your hopeless humanity.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Nobel Prize-winner Jose Saramago's brilliant new novel poses the question -- what happens when the grim reaper decides there will be no more death?

On the first day of the new year, no one dies. This of course causes consternation among politicians, religious leaders, morticians, and doctors. Among the general public, on the other hand, there is initially celebration—flags are hung out on balconies, people dance in the streets. They have achieved the great goal of humanity: eternal life. Then reality hits home—families are left to care for the permanently dying, life-insurance policies become meaningless, and funeral parlors are reduced to arranging burials for pet dogs, cats, hamsters, and parrots.

Death sits in her chilly apartment, where she lives alone with scythe and filing cabinets, and contemplates her experiment: What if no one ever died again? What if she, death with a small d, became human and were to fall in love?

Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0151012741, Hardcover)

On the first day of the new year, no one dies. This of course causes consternation among politicians, religious leaders, morticians, and doctors. Among the general public, on the other hand, there is initially celebration—flags are hung out on balconies, people dance in the streets. They have achieved the great goal of humanity: eternal life. Then reality hits home—families are left to care for the permanently dying, life-insurance policies become meaningless, and funeral parlors are reduced to arranging burials for pet dogs, cats, hamsters, and parrots.

Death sits in her chilly apartment, where she lives alone with scythe and filing cabinets, and contemplates her experiment: What if no one ever died again? What if she, death with a small d, became human and were to fall in love?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:38 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

On the first day of the new year, no one dies. This, understandably, causes consternation among politicians, religious leaders, funeral directors, and doctors. Among the general public, on the other hand, there is initially celebration - flags are hung out on balconies, people dance in the streets. They have achieved the great goal of humanity: eternal life. Then reality hits home - families are left to care for the permanently dying, life-insurance policies become meaningless, and funeral directors are reduced to arranging burials for pet dogs, cats, hamsters, and parrots. Death sits in her chilly apartment, where she lives alone with scythe and filing cabinets, and contemplates her experiment: What if no one ever died again? What if she, death with a small d, became human and were to fall in love?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
7 avail.
183 wanted
6 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5 2
1 10
1.5 4
2 37
2.5 10
3 99
3.5 39
4 154
4.5 26
5 87

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 98,434,920 books! | Top bar: Always visible