HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Caine Black Knife by Matthew Stover
Loading...
MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
141885,024 (3.93)7
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Caine is thrown into another plot, this time one that builds off a minor plot point from the second book. He finds himself in the middle of a mystery concerning Knights of Khyrl, the Black Knives orgillo clan, a strange Shadow Hunt, a city of slavery, and a hidden stone of power. And obviously since he's now been adopted into the Black Knives, there's nothing to do but to stick his nose and, of course, his fists into the fight.

Okay. First off, I just have to say that I'm always a little scared reading the next book of this series because the past two books could have been a stand alone or just a two-book series. They both end well, wrapping up everything in the book without leaving any cliffhangers. But I guess I'm pleasantly surprised, or at least mostly. This book does a good job of exploring more of Caine's past. We don't really quite see him grow or change anymore like the last two books, but we do get a peek into how Caine became an internationally famous Actor. It's quite interesting and Stover does very well alternating back and forth between the past and the present.

This book was a lot shorter than the other two books. However, maybe it's because it is part of a two-part series within this Caine series. So there is a bit of a cliffhanger at the end, be forewarned.

I think the main weakness Stover has in all of his books (because I've sort of written about this before) is that he can't seem to make his plots and plot resolutions clear. He write action and characters superbly, but the resolutions of his plots and the way these plots come to fruition just seem to lack clarity of exactly what happened. I think mostly it's because we can't trust Caine as a narrator as he doesn't always tell the reader when he's lying. It's a great technique for surprise and plot twists, but I think it happens a little too often without enough reveal of the true plot.

Also a random thing... it's a little weird, but sometimes I find myself comparing the world to Terry Pratchett's Discworld. Maybe because both worlds have a large city with "Ankh" in its name...

Three stars because I liked it. Not two and half because I did think it was interesting and it kept me intrigued. But this book isn't very memorable except for knowing Caine's past. The overall plot is actually rather dull (besides learning what happened in the aftermath of book 2). This book doesn't have enough impact - or as much impact as the other two. Still a good book, but only worth three stars.

Recommended for those who have read books 1 and 2 (obviously). It's good enough to keep reading, but don't expect as much as the first two. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
Caine is thrown into another plot, this time one that builds off a minor plot point from the second book. He finds himself in the middle of a mystery concerning Knights of Khyrl, the Black Knives orgillo clan, a strange Shadow Hunt, a city of slavery, and a hidden stone of power. And obviously since he's now been adopted into the Black Knives, there's nothing to do but to stick his nose and, of course, his fists into the fight.

Okay. First off, I just have to say that I'm always a little scared reading the next book of this series because the past two books could have been a stand alone or just a two-book series. They both end well, wrapping up everything in the book without leaving any cliffhangers. But I guess I'm pleasantly surprised, or at least mostly. This book does a good job of exploring more of Caine's past. We don't really quite see him grow or change anymore like the last two books, but we do get a peek into how Caine became an internationally famous Actor. It's quite interesting and Stover does very well alternating back and forth between the past and the present.

This book was a lot shorter than the other two books. However, maybe it's because it is part of a two-part series within this Caine series. So there is a bit of a cliffhanger at the end, be forewarned.

I think the main weakness Stover has in all of his books (because I've sort of written about this before) is that he can't seem to make his plots and plot resolutions clear. He write action and characters superbly, but the resolutions of his plots and the way these plots come to fruition just seem to lack clarity of exactly what happened. I think mostly it's because we can't trust Caine as a narrator as he doesn't always tell the reader when he's lying. It's a great technique for surprise and plot twists, but I think it happens a little too often without enough reveal of the true plot.

Also a random thing... it's a little weird, but sometimes I find myself comparing the world to Terry Pratchett's Discworld. Maybe because both worlds have a large city with "Ankh" in its name...

Three stars because I liked it. Not two and half because I did think it was interesting and it kept me intrigued. But this book isn't very memorable except for knowing Caine's past. The overall plot is actually rather dull (besides learning what happened in the aftermath of book 2). This book doesn't have enough impact - or as much impact as the other two. Still a good book, but only worth three stars.

Recommended for those who have read books 1 and 2 (obviously). It's good enough to keep reading, but don't expect as much as the first two. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
A bit different to the earlier two books and maybe not quite as good. Certainly far more dark in tone and content with a baffling nothing has been resolved but tune in next time cliff hanger ending. I still like the series but I can't help but take away a star just for whatever publisher decision cut the book in two. ( )
  NovaStalker | Jan 21, 2014 |
Spring13:

Characters: Yea, it's still Caine. Not as good of support though.

Plot: Convoluted and not quite as pulled together.

Style: Almost gets there... ( )
  Isamoor | Jul 28, 2013 |
Another grisly fantasy, this one more focused on the sword-and-sorcery and less of the high-tech distopia, but it's clearly the first half of a novel and the latter half will probably flip the balance. ( )
  JeremyPreacher | Mar 30, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
The future outwits all our certitudes.

—Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.

"This is my battle wound," he said, and he laid his stump on one of the gangrenous sores on Caine's leg. "This is your battle wound. Our wounds are one. Our blood is one."

"What the fuck are you doing?"

Orbek's lips pulled back from his tusks. "I'm adopting you."

"Are you nuts? I'm the guy that--"

"I know who you are," Orbek said. "You remember who I am. Dishonor you put on the Black Knives. Now that dishonor, you share." He showed Caine his tusks. "Now what honor you win, you share that, too. Good deal for Black Knives, hey?"

"Why would I want to join your fucking clan?"

"What you want? Who cares?" Orbek rose, grinning. "You don't choose your clan, Caine. Born Black Knife, you're Black Knife. Born Hooked Arrow, you're Hooked Arrow. Now: say that you are Black Knife, then let's go kill some guards, hey?"

Caine lay on the stone, silent.

Orbek growled, "Say it."

The lamp gave Caine's eyes a feral glitter.

"All right," he said at length. For all his tiny, mostly useless human teeth, he managed a surprisingly good mirror of Orbek's tusk-display. "Like you say: I am Black Knife."

--Blade of Tyshalle

Dedication
For Robyn, again.
As always.
First words
The dirt-colored cloud spreads wide, hugging the horizon, draining into hollows of the distant hills.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345455878, Paperback)

In Heroes Die and Blade of Tyshalle, Matthew Stover created a new kind of fantasy novel, and a new kind of hero to go with it: Caine, a street thug turned superstar, battling in a future where reality shows take place in another dimension, on a world where magic exists and gods are up close and personal. In that beautiful, savage land, Caine is an assassin without peer, a living legend born from one of the highest-rated reality shows ever made. That season, Caine almost single-handedly defeated–and all but exterminated–the fiercest of all tribes: the Black Knives. But the shocking truth of what really took place during that blood-drenched adventure has never been revealed . . . until now.

Thirty years later, Caine returns to the scene of his greatest triumph–some would say greatest crime–at the request of his adopted brother Orbek, the last of the true Black Knives. But where Caine goes, danger follows, and he soon finds himself back in familiar territory: fighting for his life against impossible odds, with the fate of two worlds hanging in the balance.

Just the way Caine likes it.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:17:52 -0400)

In Heroes Die and Blade of Tyshalle, Matthew Stover created a new kind of fantasy novel, and a new kind of hero to go with it: Caine, a street thug turned superstar, battling in a future where reality shows take place in another dimension, on a world where magic exists and gods are up close and personal. In that beautiful, savage land, Caine is an assassin without peer, a living legend born from one of the highest-rated reality shows ever made. That season, Caine almost single-handedly defeated, and all but exterminated, the fiercest of all tribes: the Black Knives. But the shocking truth of what really took place during that blood-drenched adventure has never been revealed ... until now. Thirty years later, Caine returns to the scene of his greatest triumph, some would say greatest crime, at the request of his adopted brother Orbek, the last of the true Black Knives. But where Caine goes, danger follows, and he soon finds himself back in familiar territory: fighting for his life against impossible odds, with the fate of two worlds hanging in the balance. Just the way Caine likes it.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
26 wanted2 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.93)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 11
3.5 5
4 11
4.5 6
5 9

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 94,001,619 books! | Top bar: Always visible