HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
Loading...

Death of a Salesman (1948)

by Arthur Miller

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8,67690351 (3.67)232
  1. 20
    The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (FFortuna)
  2. 20
    All My Sons by Arthur Miller (timspalding)
    timspalding: Similar, if not as good.
  3. 20
    Our Town by Thornton Wilder (kxlly)
  4. 00
    A View from the Bridge by Arthur Miller (varwenea)
    varwenea: A shared thread of angst amongst the common men ties these two plays. Both leads are flawed. Both pay for their mistakes.
  5. 01
    1933 Was A Bad Year by John Fante (Babou_wk)
    Babou_wk: Le fils refuse de suivre la carrière professionnelle de son père.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 232 mentions

English (83)  Spanish (3)  Italian (2)  Norwegian (1)  Catalan (1)  French (1)  All (91)
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
I’m sure it would be way better in it’s intended form- as a live play. But reading the script doesn’t do it for me- I just focus on the unnatural dialog and get distracted. ( )
  nheredia05 | Jun 12, 2018 |
I loved this book. It's so sad and tragic I couldn't but think that that's life.
( )
  Escher67 | Apr 18, 2018 |
Lire du théâtre, ce n’est pas toujours simple, mais ici ça prend, pas de problème, les jeux de personnages, de lieux, de temps, très bien ; ça donne envie de la voir sur scène, ce qui me semble être plutôt bon signe.
L’histoire n’est pas bien joyeuse, on pourrait même dire violente, une histoire de famille, de fierté, de façade, de réussite sociale (ou d’absence de...), d’illusions sur soi, sur les autres. On a un peu envie de secouer les personnages principaux pour qu’ils grandissent un peu, mais en même temps on comprend l’espèce de spirale dans laquelle on peut tous et chacun s’engluer. Une pièce donc très humaine, mais pas le côté le plus reluisant de l’humanité... ( )
  elisala | Feb 16, 2018 |
Tragic. ( )
  MsKathleen | Jan 29, 2018 |
I used my copy of this book to wedge up the corner of a bookcase, so it was useful, but I hated this book. Maybe I disliked it so much because it captures too well a side of apathetic, defeatist humans that I detest, but whatever the cause, I'd not recommend this book. There are too many other, better books to read to waste time on reading this one. ( )
  JBarringer | Dec 30, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

Is contained in

Has the adaptation

Has as a study

Has as a student's study guide

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
A melody is heard, played upon a flute.
Quotations
You don't understand: Willy was a salesman. And for a salesman, there is no rock bottom to the life... He's a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back - that's an earthquake.
He's liked, but he's not well liked.
Biff : Shouldn’t we do anything?

Linda : Oh, my dear, you should do a lot of things, but there’s nothing to do, so go to sleep.
Charley : Howard fired you?

Willy : That snotnose. Imagine that? I named him. I named him Howard.

Charley : Willy, when’re you gonna realize that them things don’t mean anything? You named him Howard, but you can’t sell that. The only thing you got in this world is what you can sell. And the funny thing is that you’re a salesman, and you don’t know that.

Willy : I’ve always tried to think otherwise, I guess. I always felt that if a man was impressive, and well liked, that nothing-

Charley : Why must everybody like you? Who liked J. P. Morgan? Was he impressive?...But with his pockets on he was very well liked.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140481346, Paperback)

Ever since it was first performed in 1949, Death of a Salesman has been recognized as a milestone of the American theater. In the person of Willy Loman, the aging, failing salesman who makes his living riding on a smile and a shoeshine, Arthur Miller redefined the tragic hero as a man whose dreams are at once insupportably vast and dangerously insubstantial. He has given us a figure whose name has become a symbol for a kind of majestic grandiosity—and a play that compresses epic extremems of humor and anguish, promise and loss, between the four walls of an American living room.

"By common consent, this is one of the finest dramas in the whole range of the American theater." —Brooks Atkinson, The New York Times

"So simple, central, and terrible that the run of playwrights would neither care nor dare to attempt it." —Time

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:50 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

The powerful drama of Willy Loman & his tragic end. Ever since it was first performed in 1949, Death of a Salesman has been recognized as a milestone of the American theater. In the person of Willy Loman, the aging, failing salesman who makes his living riding on a smile and a shoeshine, Arthur Miller redefined the tragic hero as a man whose dreams are at once insupportably vast and dangerously insubstantial. He has given us a figure whose name has become a symbol for a kind of majestic grandiosity-and a play that compresses epic extremems of humor and anguish, promise and loss, between the four walls of an American living room. "By common consent, this is one of the finest dramas in the whole range of the American theater."… (more)

» see all 10 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5 6
1 59
1.5 16
2 178
2.5 28
3 466
3.5 84
4 636
4.5 61
5 452

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 127,233,597 books! | Top bar: Always visible