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Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
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Death of a Salesman (1948)

by Arthur Miller

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,44369469 (3.68)196
  1. 20
    All My Sons by Arthur Miller (timspalding)
    timspalding: Similar, if not as good.
  2. 10
    Our Town by Thornton Wilder (kxlly)
  3. 00
    The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (FFortuna)
  4. 01
    1933 Was A Bad Year by John Fante (Babou_wk)
    Babou_wk: Le fils refuse de suivre la carrière professionnelle de son père.
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» See also 196 mentions

English (65)  Spanish (3)  Norwegian (1)  French (1)  All languages (70)
Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
My first experience with the material in any form. I grasp its stellar reputation and historically relevant placing in the pantheon of the Great White Way. The subject matter is heavy, but clear and honest. You know what's coming from the title. You grieve nonetheless. Certainly the wizened among us would appreciate it more, given the weighty subject matter. They're probably the target audience anyway. Now I need to experience it in the classic form... ( )
  MartinBodek | Jun 11, 2015 |
2
  kutheatre | Jun 7, 2015 |
This is dark, but you knew that. The collapse of Willy Loman in two acts, with it's reasons revealed by interjecting memories.

Side note, no one should ever be named Happy. ( )
  trilliams | May 30, 2015 |
Oh, how awful. To dream so big, it's just...man, the general mood of this story kills (literally). Most people have probably walked out after the play feeling terrible and cheated. Damn, now I want to see it and feel that way. This isn't a horrible book. In fact, it's a realistic eye-opening view at a poor man's life. This is most likely a story of someone else's life and small bits of it apply to countless people living today. Even though there's a death at the end, the salesman doesn't wring any sympathy from the readers. Only his family mourn but barely because half of them are numb in the wake of this tragedy. In the pages winding up towards the death, there was no sense of dread or premonition but it wasn't sudden either. We see loud examples of the craziness and delusions of grandeur interspersed freely between the pages. A psychologically crazed man is hardly someone a reader can relate to or even remotely like and even worse, the rest of the cast barely measure up. I did feel a faint pity for the whole family who has been beaten, worn-down, and embittered by life. Well, judging from the lot of talk and arguments, they weren't silenced though, no, not by far. I liked that author had a knack for word arrangement and semantics because I could vividly imagine how the actors would utter it. Despite all the low ratings, this book delivers in all parts that make this brutally realistic and all the more intense. This unflinching slice of life deviates from the standard fairy tale quality of a story. In other words, Death of a Salesman might just as well be a non-fiction considering the lifelike appeals of all the characters and the palpable anger and 'spite' brimming on the surface. ( )
  Annannean | Jan 6, 2015 |
I hated this when I was forced to read it in high school. In retrospect, that probably had more to do with the teacher than with the book. ( )
  lavaturtle | Dec 31, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
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First words
A melody is heard, played upon a flute.
Quotations
You don't understand: Willy was a salesman. And for a salesman, there is no rock bottom to the life... He's a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back - that's an earthquake.
He's liked, but he's not well liked.
Biff : Shouldn’t we do anything?

Linda : Oh, my dear, you should do a lot of things, but there’s nothing to do, so go to sleep.
Charley : Howard fired you?

Willy : That snotnose. Imagine that? I named him. I named him Howard.

Charley : Willy, when’re you gonna realize that them things don’t mean anything? You named him Howard, but you can’t sell that. The only thing you got in this world is what you can sell. And the funny thing is that you’re a salesman, and you don’t know that.

Willy : I’ve always tried to think otherwise, I guess. I always felt that if a man was impressive, and well liked, that nothing-

Charley : Why must everybody like you? Who liked J. P. Morgan? Was he impressive?...But with his pockets on he was very well liked.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140481346, Paperback)

Ever since it was first performed in 1949, Death of a Salesman has been recognized as a milestone of the American theater. In the person of Willy Loman, the aging, failing salesman who makes his living riding on a smile and a shoeshine, Arthur Miller redefined the tragic hero as a man whose dreams are at once insupportably vast and dangerously insubstantial. He has given us a figure whose name has become a symbol for a kind of majestic grandiosity—and a play that compresses epic extremems of humor and anguish, promise and loss, between the four walls of an American living room.

"By common consent, this is one of the finest dramas in the whole range of the American theater." —Brooks Atkinson, The New York Times

"So simple, central, and terrible that the run of playwrights would neither care nor dare to attempt it." —Time

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:50 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

The powerful drama of Willy Loman & his tragic end. Ever since it was first performed in 1949, Death of a Salesman has been recognized as a milestone of the American theater. In the person of Willy Loman, the aging, failing salesman who makes his living riding on a smile and a shoeshine, Arthur Miller redefined the tragic hero as a man whose dreams are at once insupportably vast and dangerously insubstantial. He has given us a figure whose name has become a symbol for a kind of majestic grandiosity-and a play that compresses epic extremems of humor and anguish, promise and loss, between the four walls of an American living room. "By common consent, this is one of the finest dramas in the whole range of the American theater."… (more)

» see all 12 descriptions

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