HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Guns of El Kebir by John Wilcox
Loading...

The Guns of El Kebir

by John Wilcox

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
311520,983 (4)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

I recently read another author, a historian trying his hand at fiction, in the same time period of the British Colonial era. Wilcox and his Fonthill and Jenkins team take us further and with more storytelling ability than the other.

These two are a joy, the same as Macro and Cato are in Ancient Rome. They get into scrapes, and they get out of them and around them swirl the trappings of the British Empire.

This time out we are invading Egypt to save the Suez Canal. And the picture we are given from fighting the rebellious Egyptians to the shelling of Alexandria is a spot on feeling.

With that is the historical characters we meet, just a few, but enough to give us a glimpse of the era and society. We also see a great many fictitious characters who build up the rest of theatrical for us. What we don't get is the need to meet so many true historical characters that we disbelieve that our heroes could meet so many.

That perhaps is the success that this author knows to do. Give us enough to know it is historical, but not make it so far fetched that we know our heroes would never meet every legend that existed.

The tales of the battles are well researched and the subplots that are added to round out our heroes are believable and well written also. We can believe that our main characters are growing and evolving and want to continue to find out more about them.

This is going to be a reread. ( )
  DWWilkin | Aug 13, 2012 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0755327217, Paperback)

News of Ahmed Arabi's uprising against the Anglo-French in Egypt has caused great alarm in London. The French opt not to fight and retire from the country, but the British land a force led by Sir Garnet Wolseley. Simon Fonthill, one-time subaltern and ex-Captain in the North West Frontier’s Royal Corps of Guides, and 352 Jenkins, his ex-batman and servant, are pulled from retirement and ordered to venture into the desert ahead of Wolseley's hastily assembled army. While observing the movements and location of the Egyptian force, Simon quickly realizes that bloodshed is ahead at Tel-el-Kebir.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:20 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

This title is set during one of the most famous battles fought by the British Army, the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir. News of Ahmed Arabi's uprising against the Anglo-French suzerainty in Egypt has caused great alarm in London. The French choose not to fight and retire from the country, but the British land a force led by Sir Garnet Wolseley.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5 1
4 5
4.5 1
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 133,374,834 books! | Top bar: Always visible