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Nostromo by Joseph Conrad
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Nostromo (1904)

by Joseph Conrad

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2,910321,982 (3.81)146
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English (28)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  Swedish (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (32)
Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
This is a wonderful novel, redolent with the atmosphere of 19th century South America, the coming of the railways, the exploitation of the land and minerals and the upheaval of revolution and dictatorship. The central character spends most of the novel in the background, a charismatic figure, more legend than flesh. The action centres on those who are reliant on his ability to get the workers to do what is necessary to make the colonials rich. Conrad as ever makes his characters believable. I felt very invested in the various stories. The only let down was the slightly OTT ending. The best bit was the plotting to become an independent state and Decoud's passion for that cause. I wish I'd had the time to sit and read it without interruption, though, because it did require a level of concentration I don't always have the luxury of affording a book! ( )
  missizicks | Sep 9, 2014 |
boring, hard to follow because nothing happened and people's names changed. characters were like stock characters. i liked the last 10 pages because things happened. i can't remember what the silver was all about. so long for nothing. ( )
  mahallett | Aug 29, 2014 |
For now, I am not desperately impressed with this book. I'm also not anywhere near done with it…

This is one of the "Library for the Blind And Physically Handicapped" books on tape. I've set my options as widely as possible on this, so I can receive books that I would not necessarily otherwise think of reading. I listen after I'm ready for bed, before I am asleep. Think of it as a grownup version of "bedtime story."

This book has the effect of a mild sedative, so far. It starts, and I'm asleep in something like 10 minutes.

Update: I give up. I'm only getting about 7 minutes out of 45. In other words, I'm falling asleep within 4 minutes!

Maybe some books can be enjoyed that way. This one… Not so much!


( )
  WorthyWoman | Jul 23, 2014 |
Available as a free audiobook from https://librivox.org/ ( )
  captbirdseye | Mar 6, 2014 |
Supposedly Conrad’s most complex novel, I will admit only that it is his most boring. I seem to have a jinx when it comes to not only reading Latin American authors but also books based there. I positively can’t stand them… at least so far.

Nostromo is some hero guy who ends up saving a bunch of silver bullion from falling into the hands of rebels when a military coup engulfs the fictitious Costaguana (Coast of Guano?) Quite why he’s a hero, I’m not sure, except that he does things that risk his life and earn him the respect of the privileged class who are desperate to hold on to the power they’ve consolidated by controlling the silver that is the country’s only major resource.

Eventually, it all goes horribly wrong, so there’s some redemption there. But I found it long, drawn out, superficially complicated, over-elaborate, melodramatic and, well, Latin really. It’s only redeemed by the fact that he did do some work on character development and the legacy of this novel (i.e. what everyone but me thinks of it!) ( )
  arukiyomi | Feb 1, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (70 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Joseph Conradprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Matthis, MoaPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Petersen, HenrikTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Söderberg, StenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warren, Robert PennIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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So foul a sky clears not without a storm - Shakespeare
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To John Galsworthy
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In the time of Spanish rule, and for many years afterwards, the town of Sulaco—the luxuriant beauty of the orange gardens bears witness to its antiquity—had never been commercially anything more important than a coasting port with a fairly large local trade in ox-hides and indigo. The clumsy deep-sea galleons of the conquerors that, needing a brisk gale to move at all, would lie becalmed, where your modern ship built on clipper lines forges ahead by the mere flapping of her sails, had been barred out of Sulaco by the prevailing calms of its vast gulf. Some harbours of the earth are made difficult of access by the treachery of sunken rocks and the tempests of their shores. Sulaco had found an inviolable sanctuary from the temptations of a trading world in the solemn hush of the deep Golfo Placido as if within an enormous semi-circular and unroofed temple open to the ocean, with its walls of lofty mountains hung with the mourning draperies of cloud.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014018371X, Mass Market Paperback)

A novel, in which Charles Gould returns to South America determined to make a success of the inheritance left to him by his father, the San Tome mine. But his dreams are thwarted as the country is plunged into revolution.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:19:39 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

One of the greatest political novels in any language, Nostromo reenacts the establishment of modern capitalism in a remote South American province locked between the Andes and the Pacific. In the harbor town of Sulaco, a vivid cast of characters is caught up in a civil war to decide whether its fabulously wealthy silver mine, funded by American money but owned by a third-generation English immigrant, can be preserved from the hands of venal politicians. Greed and corruption seep into the lives of everyone, and Nostromo, the principled foreman of the mine, is tested to the limit. Conrad's evocation of Latin America -- its grand landscapes, the ferocity of its politics, and the tenacity of individuals swept up in imperial ambitions -- has never been bettered. This edition features a new introduction with fresh historical and interpretative perspectives, as well as detailed explanatory notes which pay special attention to the literary, political, historical, and geographical allusions and implications of the novel. A map, a chronology of the narrative, a glossary of foreign terms, and an appendix reprinting the serial ending all complement what is sure to be the definitive edition of this classic work.… (more)

» see all 14 descriptions

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Audible.com

Nine editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

Two editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141441631, 0141389443

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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