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Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
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Mrs. Dalloway (1925)

by Virginia Woolf

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
15,246261201 (3.87)1 / 975
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    DanLovesAlice: As much as Clarissa Dalloway is a product of a constrictive society, Sinclair's Harriet Frean is even worse. Severely psychologically affected in later life by her parent's rules, her individuality and freedom is ruined by always 'behaving beautifully'.… (more)
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    Great Books by David Denby (Anonymous user)
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English (239)  Spanish (6)  French (4)  Dutch (3)  Swedish (2)  Catalan (2)  Norwegian (1)  Italian (1)  German (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  All languages (260)
Showing 1-5 of 239 (next | show all)
I was quite leery of reading Mrs. Dalloway, my second Virginia Woolf as I wasn’t a fan of my first attempt, Jacob’s Room. Once again the dreaded words “stream of consciousness” arose and I approached the book with trepidation. I chose to listen to the book as read by Juliet Stevenson, and this was an excellence choice as she did a stellar job and made the book come alive.

Mrs. Dalloway is a day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway, a high society woman in post WW I England. Mrs. Dalloway’s main concerns revolve around relationships and connections. On this particular day she is preparing to host a party and as she goes through the day getting ready for the evening, she muses on her past relationships and how her life has turned out. One gets the sense that somewhere along the way, she has lost her inner self to the Mayfair hostess she shows to the outside world.

We don’t spend the whole book locked in Mrs. Dalloways’ head. There is another storyline that runs parallel to that of Clarissa’s. This one involves a war veteran, Septimus Smith and his wife Lucrezia. Septimus is suffering from post traumatic stress and although he and Clarissa do not meet on this day, his actions are to affect her. We also meet and are given an insight into her past with encounters with her past suitor, Peter Walsh and her childhood best friend Sally Seton.

Surprise, surprise! I loved this book. The author was able to place me inside this woman’s head and make me privy to her inner most thoughts. Although some would find her shallow and selfish, I found myself relating to her. I think most everyone thinks about their choices and wonder what life would be like if they had chosen a different path. This is a short book but is packed with unforgettable images and beautiful language and ultimately is a story about wasted potential. ( )
1 vote DeltaQueen50 | Sep 3, 2018 |
This is tough to score. It has a unique style, which I appreciate. The narrative weaves throughout, allowing the reader into many heads. For that, I'd give it a 4. What's going on in those heads is mostly boring, self serving prattle, a score of true. I've had it on my shelf for years, so I'm glad I completed it. ( )
  melanieklo | Jul 25, 2018 |
woman plans to kill herself or have a dinner party ( )
  margaretfield | May 30, 2018 |
I've been thinking about this book, on and off, since I finished listening to it. It didn't so much end as just stopped... but I may be mistaken about that. It seems so transparent, like clear topical water, but has surprising depth once you step in. Definitely, definitely need to read/listen to this one again. ( )
  hopeevey | May 20, 2018 |
I've never read anything quite like this. At first I found the long, complex sentences to be too much, but I got into the swing of it eventually. By the end I was really enjoying the way the stories almost came together, just glancing, never really involving each other. My friend really loves Woolf and described her writing as lyrical, washing over you like waves. I get what she was saying now. ( )
  gabarito | May 13, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 239 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (52 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Woolf, Virginiaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bell, VanessaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brunt, NiniTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cunningham, ValentineIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duffy, Carol AnnIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hämäläinen, KyllikkiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Howard, MaureenForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McNichol, StellaEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Risvik, KariTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scalero, AlessandraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Showalter, ElaineIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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People/Characters
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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself.

For Lucy had her work cut out for her. The doors would be taken off their hinges; Rumpelmayer’s men were coming. And then, thought Clarissa Dalloway, what a morning—fresh as if issued to children on a beach.
La signora Dalloway disse che i fiori li avrebbe comprati lei.
Quotations
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
… aveva l'anima tutta arrugginita da quell'astio che vi si era conficcato dentro: …
Chi ha coraggio di mettere figli in un mondo come questo? Non si può perpetuare il dolore, né aumentare la razza di quegli animali lussuriosi, i quali non hanno emozioni durature, ma solo capricci e vanità che li trascinano alla deriva.
«E basta, per ora. Più tardi…», e la frase morì sgocciolando, clop clop clop, come un rubinetto soddisfatto d'essere rimasto aperto.
Si sarebbero mummificati giovani.
… (in grigio e argento, la dama si dondolava come una foca sull'orlo della sua vasca, affamata d'inviti, tipica moglie di un professionista riuscito) …
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
"Mrs. Dalloway," "Mrs. Dalloway's Party," "The Mrs. Dalloway Reader," and "Mrs. Dalloway" in combination with other titles (e.g., "The Waves" or "To the Lighthouse") are each distinct works or combinations of works. Please preserve these distinctions, and don't combine any of the other works with this one. Thank you.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
s Clarissa Dalloway walks through London on a fine June morning, a sky-writing plane captures her attention. Crowds stare upwards to decipher the message while the plane turns and loops, leaving off one letter, picking up another. Like the airplane's swooping path, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway follows Clarissa and those whose lives brush hers--from Peter Walsh, whom she spurned years ago, to her daughter Elizabeth, the girl's angry teacher, Doris Kilman, and war-shocked Septimus Warren Smith, who is sinking into madness.

As Mrs. Dalloway prepares for the party she is giving that evening, a series of events intrudes on her composure. Her husband is invited, without her, to lunch with Lady Bruton (who, Clarissa notes anxiously, gives the most amusing luncheons). Meanwhile, Peter Walsh appears, recently from India, to criticize and confide in her. His sudden arrival evokes memories of a distant past, the choices she made then, and her wistful friendship with Sally Seton.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0156628708, Paperback)

As Clarissa Dalloway walks through London on a fine June morning, a sky-writing plane captures her attention. Crowds stare upwards to decipher the message while the plane turns and loops, leaving off one letter, picking up another. Like the airplane's swooping path, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway follows Clarissa and those whose lives brush hers--from Peter Walsh, whom she spurned years ago, to her daughter Elizabeth, the girl's angry teacher, Doris Kilman, and war-shocked Septimus Warren Smith, who is sinking into madness.

As Mrs. Dalloway prepares for the party she is giving that evening, a series of events intrudes on her composure. Her husband is invited, without her, to lunch with Lady Bruton (who, Clarissa notes anxiously, gives the most amusing luncheons). Meanwhile, Peter Walsh appears, recently from India, to criticize and confide in her. His sudden arrival evokes memories of a distant past, the choices she made then, and her wistful friendship with Sally Seton.

Woolf then explores the relationships between women and men, and between women, as Clarissa muses, "It was something central which permeated; something warm which broke up surfaces and rippled the cold contact of man and woman, or of women together.... Her relation in the old days with Sally Seton. Had not that, after all, been love?" While Clarissa is transported to past afternoons with Sally, and as she sits mending her green dress, Warren Smith catapults desperately into his delusions. Although his troubles form a tangent to Clarissa's web, they undeniably touch it, and the strands connecting all these characters draw tighter as evening deepens. As she immerses us in each inner life, Virginia Woolf offers exquisite, painful images of the past bleeding into the present, of desire overwhelmed by society's demands. --Joannie Kervran Stangeland

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:14 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

Depicts the events, thoughts, and actions of a single day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway.

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Average: (3.87)
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Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141182490, 0141198508, 024195679X

Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1909438014, 1909438022

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