HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Pandora's Star by Peter F. Hamilton
Loading...

Pandora's Star (original 2004; edition 2005)

by Peter F. Hamilton

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,744592,138 (4)1 / 121
Member:bj
Title:Pandora's Star
Authors:Peter F. Hamilton
Info:Del Rey (2005), Mass Market Paperback, 992 pages
Collections:Your library, audiobooks
Rating:**
Tags:sci fi, audiobook 2013, read 2013, unfinished

Work details

Pandora's Star by Peter F. Hamilton (2004)

  1. 41
    A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge (orange_epsilon)
    orange_epsilon: If you like reading about space travel and alien cultures, then this is the book for you.
  2. 10
    The Dreaming Void by Peter F. Hamilton (jannis)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (58)  Catalan (1)  All languages (59)
Showing 1-5 of 58 (next | show all)
To be accurate, this review should go on for pages, and then stop before actually getting to the point, since that's what Pandora's Star does -- after more than 700 pages, the story stops with absolutely nothing resolved. You must read Judas Unchained to see how it all comes out.

So, is this story worth 1500 pages? I'd have to say no. I'm a big fan of Hamilton's three-volume Reality Dysfunction, despite the deus ex machina resolution, and I was OK with half the plot line in the three-volume Void Trilogy, but bored with the world smashing part. With this two-volume set, a number of interesting threads are created, including the story -- told from both sides -- of detective Paula Myo and her life long career attempting to catch the terrorist Adam Elvin, the star (actually two, but one never seems to matter much) in question and its mysterious encapsulation behind a barrier, the system-dominating entity that seeks to exterminate humanity, the Jobs and Wozniak like creators of wormhole technology, the mysterious StarFlyer alien who may or may not exist and be plotting against humanity, and much more. Unfortunately, in the end -- no plot spoilers here -- it all comes down to a pile of McGuffins and several hundred pages of racing against the clock. Other aspects that didn't work for me: a really long boring thread with virtually no important plot payoff or emotional resonance, repeated reference to present-day corporations, e.g., Volvo, and even devices (DVDs passed by at least once), and an over-fondness for handheld super-energy plasma blasters.

OK for fans of Hamilton who don't mind that it's all a lot of noise and little substance. ( )
1 vote ChrisRiesbeck | Jun 11, 2016 |
An intensely rich world-building book. New worlds were introduced through nearly 900 pages of the book. This book is so large that there are any number of threads that one could comment on. In general it was very satisfying -- although it got to be like a nightime soap opera of the '80's (think Dallas) with everyone being rich and glamorous. A host of characters, so a bit of a struggle to keep the story line straight if you put the book down for any length of time. (Spoiler alert) I had issue with the evacuation of the planets -- the capacity of the 'worrmhole train' wouldn't make this feasible. Unsatisfactory ending for having invested into an 1150 page book that basically requires you to read the same size sequel. ( )
  skraft001 | May 30, 2016 |
Good points: It's indeed galaxy wide, but characters based. Just what I like.
The writing style is nice and it flows easily(it truly helps since english is not my primary language)
The main story is really interesting, as is the galaxy itself.
Mankind future is not all negative, like it seems to be in most of the recent sci-fi books.

So-so points: The pacing. After 200 pages, new characters were still being introduced...! The main plot started to move forward only around page 400, then we get a political slowdown near page 600 and it's started moving again about 100 pages later.
The endless descriptions: Good God, that author doesn't cut corners when he is introducing a character!(or a race, or a planet) We literally gets days of unrelated stuff they were doing before getting involved in the main plot! I am on the fence about this, as it makes for hundreds of pages that could have been easilly removed and it wouldn't alter the story inthe slightess bit, but it also makes for extra-fleshed out characters(or races, or places). It's a good thing that the writing style is to my liking, it makes this bearable.

But what's really important is... when I reached the end, I couldn't wait to read the follow-up book! ( )
  kinwolf | Jan 9, 2016 |
I liked this positive portrayal of the future ( )
  Iceform | May 31, 2015 |
Humans are scattered throughout the Galaxy. Their civilization is surprisingly peaceful, prosperous, and integrated with multiple aliens.

But then a dyson sphere is placed around two worlds and they feel they need to discover if it spheres are for protection from an invading alien race, or instead is it there to stop whoever is on those worlds from escaping.

Then things really begin to go wrong.

Great space opera, encompassing multiple societies and lots of surprising alien viewpoints. Very thoughtfully presented with some deep subjects, like life and death and how we'd deal with a species that is so different from us that we can't hope to come to some sort of accommodation.

My only complaint is the book ends with cliff hangers. But at least there is only one more book in the series. ( )
  majkia | Apr 11, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 58 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Mars completely dominated space outside the Ulysses, the bloated dirty-ginger crescent of a planet that never quite made it as a world.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary
Wormholes expand life

To other planets until

Enemy wakens.

(legallypuzzled)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345479211, Mass Market Paperback)

Critics have compared the engrossing space operas of Peter F. Hamilton to the classic sagas of such sf giants as Isaac Asimov and Frank Herbert. But Hamilton’s bestselling fiction—powered by a fearless imagination and world-class storytelling skills—has also earned him comparison to Tolstoy and Dickens. Hugely ambitious, wildly entertaining, philosophically stimulating: the novels of Peter F. Hamilton will change the way you think about science fiction. Now, with Pandora’s Star, he begins a new multivolume adventure, one that promises to be his most mind-blowing yet.

The year is 2380. The Intersolar Commonwealth, a sphere of stars some four hundred light-years in diameter, contains more than six hundred worlds, interconnected by a web of transport “tunnels” known as wormholes. At the farthest edge of the Commonwealth, astronomer Dudley Bose observes the impossible: Over one thousand light-years away, a star . . . vanishes. It does not go supernova. It does not collapse into a black hole. It simply disappears. Since the location is too distant to reach by wormhole, a faster-than-light starship, the Second Chance, is dispatched to learn what has occurred and whether it represents a threat. In command is Wilson Kime, a five-time rejuvenated ex-NASA pilot whose glory days are centuries behind him.

Opposed to the mission are the Guardians of Selfhood, a cult that believes the human race is being manipulated by an alien entity they call the Starflyer. Bradley Johansson, leader of the Guardians, warns of sabotage, fearing the Starflyer means to use the starship’s mission for its own ends,.

Pursued by a Commonwealth special agent convinced the Guardians are crazy but dangerous, Johansson flees. But the danger is not averted. Aboard the Second Chance, Kime wonders if his crew has been infiltrated. Soon enough, he will have other worries. A thousand light-years away, something truly incredible is waiting: a deadly discovery whose unleashing will threaten to destroy the Commonwealth . . . and humanity itself.

Could it be that Johansson was right?



From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:59 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

The year is 2380. The Intersolar Commonwealth, a sphere of stars some four hundred light-years in diameter, contains more than six hundred worlds, interconnected by a web of transport "tunnels" known as wormholes. At the farthest edge of the Commonwealth, astronomer Dudley Bose observes the impossible: Over one thousand light-years away, a star ... vanishes. It does not go supernova. It does not collapse into a black hole. It simply disappears. Since the location is too distant to reach by wormhole, a faster-than-light starship, the Second Chance, is dispatched to learn what has occurred and whether it represents a threat. In command is Wilson Kime, a five-time rejuvenated ex-NASA pilot whose glory days are centuries behind him. Opposed to the mission are the Guardians of Selfhood, a cult that believes the human race is being manipulated by an alien entity they call the Starflyer. Bradley Johansson, leader of the Guardians, warns of sabotage, fearing the Starflyer means to use the starshipb7ss mission for its own ends. Pursued by a Commonwealth special agent convinced the Guardians are crazy but dangerous, Johansson flees. But the danger is not averted. Aboard the Second Chance, Kime wonders if his crew has been infiltrated. Soon enough, he will have other worries. A thousand light-years away, something truly incredible is waiting: a deadly discovery whose unleashing will threaten to destroy the Commonwealth ... and humanity itself. Could it be that Johansson was right?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
5 avail.
54 wanted
4 pay7 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5 1
1 17
1.5 2
2 27
2.5 12
3 118
3.5 33
4 283
4.5 39
5 248

Audible.com

4 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 107,524,073 books! | Top bar: Always visible