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Spin by Robert Charles Wilson
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Spin (2005)

by Robert Charles Wilson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Spin (1)

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2,8581232,029 (3.98)127
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English (113)  French (7)  German (1)  Spanish (1)  Dutch (1)  All (123)
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
This is a fun book. Ok, not necessarily a fun topic - aliens holding the planet earth in some time warp so that the universe ages much faster than earth - but a pageturning good yarn that is hard to put down.

Robert Charles Wilson uses big topics - universe aging, Earth being destroyed and Martians to name a few, adds a few characters that are easy to like and "Whamo" out comes a fun, interesting book to read. Recommended. ( )
  bhuesers | Mar 29, 2017 |
Spin is one of the most satisfying science fiction novels I have read in years. Quite a few novels have good parts but this has a number of good parts and they tie together to create a rich and rewarding read. There's a lot of science to this novel, but I think not so much as to scare people off who only have read a little science fiction. Stuff gets explained. The stuff that doesn't get explained is what the people in the story are trying to figure out. The entire novel is built around character arcs.

There are quite a few excellent reviews available to peruse and rather than throwing a story summation here I recommend browsing the reviews of people who liked this. You will note a lot of people REALLY liked it. I am one of those types. Maybe the story idea will scare you off. I hope not. Part of the enjoyment of reading this was how there was a big central mystery as well as smaller ones and whenever I thought the story was going one way it went another and surprised me. I highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys speculative fiction.

There are two novels that follow this, 'Axis' and 'Vortex' - I'm not sure how closely related but this is absolutely a standalone story. ( )
1 vote RBeffa | Jan 25, 2017 |
What I would call a perfect SF book, or least one without major flaws, to my eyes. There are many books I love, but for the ending, or the long dry stretch, or the inadequately developed premise, or the cliched characters. With Spin, the human story and the SF ideas both develop organically over 100s of pages, reaching a sound conclusion for both. Yes, there are two sequels, but the novel does not just stop, as did Jo Walton's otherwise excellent "Just City". Yes, the explanation of the bubble that cuts Earth off from the rest of the universe is cosmic in both time and space, with surprising reveals along the way, but the explanation isn't incomprehensible, as was Greg Egan's in "Quarantine." The human story, tracking a handful of major characters over the decades, through catastrophic changes, maintains a singular focus on the flawed but never annoying narrator, from youth to advanced adulthood. I never grew tired hearing the details of his life, relationships, emotions, confusions, and failures. A secondary character near the end ties this aspect of the novel together: "We're all strangers, to ourselves and each other. We're never formally introduced." Yes, characters deliver lectures rather than dialog at certain points, but that's the price speculative SF has to pay in a personal narrative.

Highly recommended. ( )
2 vote ChrisRiesbeck | Dec 19, 2016 |
I was induced to read this by Sergio, a complete stranger who commented on my review of [b:Bios|1077067|Bios|Robert Charles Wilson|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1312042953s/1077067.jpg|1656512], encouraging me to read Spin.

Bios was horrible.

But I figured that if a complete stranger could take the time to recommend a different book by the author, then I should try it.

I am glad I did.

It confirms my opinion that Wilson is a pseudo-scyence lover and a snob of HUGE proportions. And he's a complete dickhead who loves his own words like a lover.

Unlike Bios, this had an interesting premise-mankind stalled while the universe races on.

But the execution was horrific. The main character representing all those who are uncertain but don't trust religion. The sister, who gets taken in by a cult, because as we the readers all know [Wilson doesn't insinuate this point, he BLUDGEONS], all religions are false and are simply setup by smart people to take advantage of the gullible. The brother, the brilliant scientist who keeps on going in the face of any and all discouragement and setbacks and who is so pure as to sacrifice himself for Scyence's sake [and yes, Scyence seems to be Wilson's god here. He just doesn't want to admit it].

So if you enjoy thinly disguised "philosophy" [ie, I'm right, you are wrong, because I wrote it so], then I think Wilson is for you. I've read less preachy and pushy Christian romances than this, and that is saying something!

so thank you Sergio. You have helped me definitely cross off Wilson from my TBR author list. And yes, that is a good thing :D" ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Dec 10, 2016 |
Humble eBook Bundle 2
  GoldenDarter | Sep 15, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert Charles Wilsonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gálvölgyi, JuditTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 076534825X, Mass Market Paperback)

Spin is Robert Charles Wilson's Hugo Award-winning masterpiece—a stunning combination of a galactic "what if" and a small-scale, very human story.
 
One night in October when he was ten years old, Tyler Dupree stood in his back yard and watched the stars go out. They all flared into brilliance at once, then disappeared, replaced by a flat, empty black barrier. He and his best friends, Jason and Diane Lawton, had seen what became known as the Big Blackout. It would shape their lives.
 
The effect is worldwide. The sun is now a featureless disk—a heat source, rather than an astronomical object. The moon is gone, but tides remain. Not only have the world's artificial satellites fallen out of orbit, their recovered remains are pitted and aged, as though they'd been in space far longer than their known lifespans. As Tyler, Jason, and Diane grow up, a space probe reveals a bizarre truth: The barrier is artificial, generated by huge alien artifacts. Time is passing faster outside the barrier than inside—more than a hundred million years per year on Earth. At this rate, the death throes of the sun are only about forty years in our future.
 
Jason, now a promising young scientist, devotes his life to working against this slow-moving apocalypse. Diane throws herself into hedonism, marrying a sinister cult leader who's forged a new religion out of the fears of the masses.
 
Earth sends terraforming machines to Mars to let the onrush of time do its work, turning the planet green. Next they send humans…and immediately get back an emissary with thousands of years of stories to tell about the settling of Mars. Then Earth's probes reveal that an identical barrier has appeared around Mars. Jason, desperate, seeds near space with self-replicating machines that will scatter copies of themselves outward from the sun—and report back on what they find.
 
Life on Earth is about to get much, much stranger.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:33 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"One night in October when he was ten years old, Tyler Dupree stood in his back yard and watched the stars go out. They all flared into brilliance at once, then disappeared, replaced by a flat, empty black barrier. He and his best friends, Jason and Diane Lawton, had seen what became known as the Big Blackout. It would shape their lives." "The effect is worldwide. The sun is now a featureless disk - a heat source, rather than an astronomical object. The moon is gone, but tides remain. Not only have the world's artificial satellites fallen out of orbit, their recovered remains are pitted and aged, as though they'd been in space far longer than their known lifespans. As Tyler, Jason, and Diane grow up, space probe reveals a bizarre truth: The barrier is artificial, generated by huge alien artifacts. Time is passing faster outside the barrier than inside--more than a hundred million years per day on Earth. At this rate, the death throes of the sun are only about forty years in our future." "Jason, now a promising young scientist, devotes his life to working against this slow-moving apocalypse. Diane throws herself into hedonism, marrying a sinister cult leader who's forged a new religion out of the fears of the masses." "Earth sends terraforming machines to Mars to let the onrush of time do its work, turning the planet green. Next they send humans...and immediately get back an emissary with thousands of years of stories to tell about the settling of Mars. Then Earth's probes reveal that an identical barrier has appeared around Mars. Jason, desperate, seeds near space with self-replicating machines that will scatter copies of themselves outward from the sun - and report back on what they find. Life on Earth is about to get much, much stranger."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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