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The Big Sort: Why the Clustering of…
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The Big Sort: Why the Clustering of Like-Minded America Is Tearing Us…

by Bill Bishop

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3101935,978 (3.57)15
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» See also 15 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
This is shaping up to be a very interesting read. ( )
  kristi_test_05 | Jun 20, 2016 |
This is shaping up to be a very interesting read. ( )
  kristi_test_05 | Jun 20, 2016 |
This is shaping up to be a very interesting read. ( )
  kristi_test_05 | Jun 20, 2016 |
This is shaping up to be a very interesting read. ( )
  kristi_test_04 | Jun 17, 2016 |
This makes a well-documented case that a political "clustering" trend, begun in the mid-1970s, is increasingly dividing the cultural geography of the US down ideological lines. One statistic is really enough to convince me: "During the closely fought 1976 election, about a quarter of Americans lived in landslide counties (i.e. those that voted for a candidate by more than 20 percentage points). By the 2004 election, about half the country lived in such counties." (http://www.creators.com/opinion/david-sirota/this-summer-s-trilogy-of-truth.html )

Not only does Bishop provide a significant amount of other demographic data substantiating this trend. He also illustrates the (qualitative) cultural changes as he encounters people around the country from the South Austin liberals to exurban fundamentalist Christians in Oregon. He belabors some of his points a little too long for me, but others might appreciate the less consequential details of this or that "sorting" phenomenon.

This trend will not likely be remembered as anything other than a historical curiosity. But, since there is no apparent evidence that it is slowing, it's probably a good idea to take notice of these patterns in which we're involved. If that awareness results in (only slightly) better informed choices, it is important. ( )
  dmac7 | Jun 14, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
As the journalist Bill Bishop shows in his eye-opening demographic study The Big Sort, for decades we have been withdrawing into “communities of like-mindedness” where the gap between individual and collective closes. These are places where elective affinities are supplanting electoral politics.
 
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0618689354, Hardcover)

The untold story of why America is so culturally and politically divided

America may be more diverse than ever coast to coast, but the places where we live are becoming increasingly crowded with people who live, think, and vote as we do. This social transformation didn't happed by accident. We’ve built a country where we can all choose the neighborhood -- and religion and news show -- most compatible with our lifestyle and beliefs. And we are living with the consequences of this way-of-life segregation. Our country has become so polarized, so ideologically inbred, that people don’t know and can’t understand those who live just a few miles away. The reason for this situation, and the dire implications for our country, is the subject of this groundbreaking work.

In 2004, the journalist Bill Bishop, armed with original and startling demographic data, made national news in a series of articles showing how Americans have been sorting themselves over the past three decades into alarmingly homogeneous communities -- not by region or by red state or blue state, but by city and even neighborhood. In The Big Sort, Bishop deepens his analysis in a brilliantly reported book that makes its case from the ground up, starting with stories about how we live today and then drawing on history, economics, and our changing political landscape to create one of the most compelling big-picture accounts of America in recent memory.

The Big Sort will draw comparisons to Robert Putnam's Bowling Alone and Richard Florida's The Rise of the Creative Class and will redefine the way Americans think about themselves for decades to come.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:28 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

America may be more diverse than ever coast to coast, but the places where we live are becoming increasingly crowded with people who live, think, and vote as we do. We've built a country where we can all choose the neighborhood--and church and news show--most compatible with our lifestyle and beliefs. And we are living with the consequences of this way-of-life segregation. Our country has become so polarized, so ideologically inbred, that people don't know and can't understand those who live just a few miles away. The reason for this situation, and the dire implications for our country, is the subject of this groundbreaking work.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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