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The Most Amazing Man Who Ever Lived by…
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The Most Amazing Man Who Ever Lived (original 1995; edition 1995)

by Robert Rankin

Series: Cornelius Murphy (4)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
253274,952 (3.53)1
Norman's dad fell out of the sky and flattened him. Norman doesn't want to work at The Universal Reincarnation Company and it's God's fault. If He hadn't closed down Hell, then Heaven wouldn't have got overcrowded and they wouldn't have built the extension, and the URC wouldn't be recycling souls.
Member:cuffs
Title:The Most Amazing Man Who Ever Lived
Authors:Robert Rankin
Info:Corgi Adult (1995), Paperback, 317 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Most Amazing Man Who Ever Lived by Robert Rankin (1995)

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I think I've read this. I'm not sure. All Rankin's non-Brentford-trilogy books kind of blur together in my head, for the very good reason that they are in fact all the same book, with some of the words re-arranged. Probably best read bombed out of your gourd, because that's how they were written. ( )
  sloopjonb | May 24, 2014 |
The third, and last, book of the Cornelius Murphy trilogy.

Hugo Rune, “the most amazing man who ever lived”, is definitely the nemesis of Cornelius Murphy and his friend Tuppe – who are the “stuff of epics”. This very imaginative clash of amazing people is also joined by cars that catch “mad car disease” and make themselves an interesting force to deal with. The fiction goes over the top in delightful ways.

Unlike Rankin's other trilogies which continue on well beyond the third book, this book does bring the series to a satisfying end. ( )
  Calypso42 | Dec 21, 2010 |
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Dedication
For the most amazing man who ever published me. All hail to Mr Patrick Janson-Smith
Dedicated to my son Robert
"THE STUFF OF EPICS"
For his love and kindness.
You make your old Dad proud.
First words
'And then I shall leap from the east pier and be borne aloft by these wings.' Norman the elder made an expansive guesture which Norman the younger found most encouraging.
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