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Twelve Angry Men by Reginald Rose
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Twelve Angry Men (1957)

by Reginald Rose

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» See also 24 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
excellent audio play... kind of like a radio drama ( )
  DavidO1103 | Apr 3, 2014 |
The famous play about justice. Twelve jurors, all men as this was the fifties and apparently women didn't figure, are locked in a room to decide if a sixteen year-old boy is guilty of stabbing his abusive father to death. If they find him guilty, he gets the death penalty.

This is less than a hundred pages, yet it covers so many topics that could bias a jury: race, economic class, parenting, immigration issues and sense of duty. ( )
  mstrust | Jul 11, 2013 |
You would think they would've forced us to watch Twelve Angry Men in law school, but they didn't. After reading the play and watching the movie a few weeks ago, I feel like every American should have to read Twelve Angry Men. The play centers on a jury deliberation. During several heated hours (literally and figuratively), twelve men discuss whether the verdict they come to will exonerate a young man for the murder of his father, or condemn him to a death sentence that the judge explained he had no qualms about ordering, should the verdict be guilty. Each man plays his part, from strong prejudice to neutral to easily swayed to chaotic to apathetic. I found this play to be riveting and extremely frightening. (specifically because I cannot stop thinking about the fact that most juries probably do not have that voice of reason or pay such close attention to detail. There are so many scary aspects to both human nature and the jury process, not least of which is that juries often have the life and/or liberty of another human being in their hands) The jurors are given no names, so it can be a feat to try to follow along with an understanding of which character is which, however the overall discussions are the most important aspect of the play, and a reader can easily follow the feel of the room and see whose arguments are most persuasive. This play can be read in a mere hour or so and I recommend it to everyone, especially people who want to read more classics. ( )
  FlanneryAC | Mar 31, 2013 |
I first read this in high school. In our class reading, I played Juror Number 10 - the racist. This play is absolutely brilliantly written. Both movie versions are among my favorite movies. ( )
  benuathanasia | Nov 10, 2012 |
There aren't many readthroughs that are so well balanced for 12 parts. The play is a bit far fetched in places - the legal system just doesn't really work like that - but a mild suspension of disbelief is all you need, and the tension of who is right and who is wrong is maintained with great ambiguity even to the final curtain. ( )
  atreic | May 15, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0143104403, Paperback)

The Penguin Classics debut that inspired a classic film and a current Broadway revival

Reginald Rose's landmark American drama was a critically acclaimed teleplay, and went on to become a cinematic masterpiece in 1957 starring Henry Fonda, for which Rose wrote the adaptation. A blistering character study and an examination of the American melting pot and the judicial system that keeps it in check, Twelve Angry Men holds at its core a deeply patriotic belief in the U.S. legal system. The story's focal point, known only as Juror Eight, is at first the sole holdout in an 11-1 guilty vote. Eight sets his sights not on proving the other jurors wrong but rather on getting them to look at the situation in a clear-eyed way not affected by their personal biases. Rose deliberately and carefully peels away the layers of artifice from the men and allows a fuller picture of America, at its best and worst, to form.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:25:02 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

"A blistering character study and an examination of the American melting pot and the judicial system that keeps it in check, Twelve Angry Men holds at its core a deeply patriotic belief in the U.S. legal system. The story's focal point, known only as Juror Eight, is at first the sole holdout in an 11-1 guilty vote. Eight sets his sights not on proving the other jurors wrong but rather on getting them to look at the situation in a clear-eyed way not affected by their personal biases. Rose deliberately and carefully peels away the layers of artifice from the men and allows a fuller picture of America, at its best and worst, to form."--Publisher description.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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