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Hurry Home, Candy (Harper Trophy Books) by…

Hurry Home, Candy (Harper Trophy Books) (edition 1972)

by Meindert DeJong, Maurice Sendak (Illustrator)

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156276,544 (3.71)2
Title:Hurry Home, Candy (Harper Trophy Books)
Authors:Meindert DeJong
Other authors:Maurice Sendak (Illustrator)
Info:HarperCollins (1972), Paperback, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
Tags:childrens, newbery

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Hurry Home, Candy by Meindert DeJong



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Story of a little stray dog, at first loved by two little kids, but frequently beaten by their mother (a strict housewife) and then lost during a storm. Wandering between houses until frightened by bigger dogs it ends up half-starving in the countryside. Due to the rough treatment when it was very young, the dog is timid and in particular, terrified of brooms (used as punishment) so it avoids people. Happens to find safety from a pack of dogs under a farm woman's wagon, so the dog is travelling with her when an accident occurs, and everyone thinks he is her dog. While the woman is in the hospital he's taken to the dog pound, where although the surroundings and noise are terrifying, for the first time the little dog starts to respond to kindness from the pound man. But there are always brooms around, and the dog's phobia causes him to flee and hide again. He finally gets adopted by a retired ship captain, who looses him (once again, because of a broom). Then an incident with bank robbers get published in the newspapers, and the dog happened to be there, and the original children who had him as a little puppy see the pictures. They also see that the captain is offering a reward for his return. The kids don't care about their lost puppy anymore, they want new bicycles so go looking for the puppy in hopes of the reward money. Eventually it's another woman in the neighborhood who saw the dog scavenging around her back porch earlier in the story, who coaches the children on how to catch the frightened dog (but they are inept at following her directions), and helps the captain lure him home again. The dog gets there of his own accord, the captain finally recognizes his broom phobia, banishes brooms from his house, and now the little dog has a place to belong, without fear.

Yeah, it sounds rather convoluted and the parts at the end where all the different people who had seen or helped the dog came together to get him found and back to his new home, was a bit too convenient. But it is a really tender story showing things from the dog's perspective, how easily a fear can get instilled in a young animal and affect its life for a long time, while people don't realize the reasons behind its behavior.

from the Dogear Diary ( )
  jeane | Sep 15, 2015 |
This book is about a dog who goes on many adventures. He experiences being loved and being lost. Even when a few friendly people invite him in at times, Candy keeps moving along until he finds a home he can call his own forever.

This book made me cry. It's so sad to "see" the dog be left all to himself by no fault of his own when all he wants is a home. It's amazing how everyone goes through lonely times like this when all we have is ourselves to depend on. Sometimes it's comforting to know that someone else out there is just like you and looking for somewhere they can call home forever.

In my opinion if you were to use this book in a classroom type setting, it would be best to let the kids take it home and read it whether as a group or as individual, supplementary reading material. I know when I read this book as a kid I liked to go back and reread some of the really exciting chapters just so I could comprehend it all. This would be a good book to use as an example for descriptive writing as well. The author really pulls you into the dog's life without you actually being the dog. Any child that seems to be feeling lonely would probably appreciate this book.
  ksimpson | Dec 3, 2008 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Meindert DeJongprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sendak, MauriceIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0064400255, Paperback)

The dog was lost. He had no name, and no one to love him. He has only the silent, empty countryside, and a few crumbs and bare bones he could pick up. He had only himself, and he was afraid. Along the way, the little dog found a few friends, people who gave him shelter for a while, but always he moved on -- until he found a place he could call home forever.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:41 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

A lonely, little stray dog survives several terrifying experiences, and eventually finds a good home.

(summary from another edition)

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