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Thinner Than Thou by Kit Reed
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Thinner Than Thou

by Kit Reed

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Great book focusing on our increasing addiction to having the "perfect" body. ( )
  zdufran | Jul 23, 2008 |
Reed brilliantly delves into the psyche of a society that is enslaved by its relentless quest for physical perfection and ever-lasing youth. Thinner Than Thou scrutinizes every aspects of the image-making industry, i.e., plastic surgery, fat farms, diet fads, diet aids, cosmetics industry etc. and serves as a social commentary on the ridiculous, cult-like obsession we have with attaining the ideal appearance. I would definitely recommend this book to high school adolescents who already grapple with teen angst when it comes to their physique. This book definitely raises a social consciousness about a superficial world that is utterly infatuated with unattainable perfection and the extremes to which its members are willing to undergo (financially, emotionally and physically) to achieve it. ( )
  carlabortiz | May 7, 2008 |
I feel dirty after reading this book. It's a rather formulaic dystopian story about image trumping inner character. The humor at the beginning of the book is not sustained throughout. One dimensional. I adored the nebulous ending.

Favorite passages:

Mom’s so smart but she prayed and prayed and never lost an ounce, was she doing it wrong or praying for the wrong thing? Mom, she realizes, has had a long, sad life trying to be beautiful, when any fool can see at a dead run that beautiful was nothing she was ever going to be, not even in the pictures when she was a lot thinner and almost as young as Betz. What can Mom hope for now, when her life is over because she is, like north of forty and therefore officially old? So what is it with you, Mom, isn’t it enough to be smart, which is the best thing about you?

My love courted me with roast duck and steamed Christmas puddings, we coalesced in debauchery and now we are bonded: we fall down together and gorge and get up and live for the next night when we fall down all over again, but when you are happy, especially when you are this happy, you must always remember. Nothing is forever. It never is.

For imagining there’s anything out there beyond physical perfection, for believing there is something beyond the NOW, these groups will be hunted down and burned out of their quarters or harassed to extinction. It’s not persecution, exactly, but it is. These holdouts who pursue a higher power, whether they call it God or Yahweh or Buddha or Allah or a name we don’t recognize, are a living reproach to right-thinking people who live for NOW. They are an insult in these days when body is everything, and appearance comes first.

“He wants us all fat and hungry and suffering, OK? He likes us that way.”
“No!”
“This people do. Who else do they have to make fun of?”
1 vote Clueless | Apr 14, 2008 |
Body image to the extreme. Is this where the world is heading with all of the fast-food chains and diet scams? It could be, and that is what makes this book frightening. ( )
1 vote lesleydawn | Dec 10, 2006 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 076531195X, Paperback)

In the tomorrow of Thinner Than Thou, the cult of the body has become the one true religion. The Dedicated Sisters are a religious order sworn to help anorexic, bulimic, and morbidly obese youth. Throughout the land, houses of worship have been replaced by the health clubs of the Crossed Triceps. And through hypnotically powerful evangelical infomercials, the Reverend Earl preaches the heaven of the Afterfat, where you will look like a Greek god and can eat anything you want. Just sign over your life savings and come to Sylphania, the most luxurious weight-loss spa in the world, where the Reverend himself will personally supervise your attainment of physical perfection.
But the glory of youth and thinness that America worships conceals a hidden world where teens train for the competitive eating circuit, where fat porn and obese strippers feed people's dark desires, and where an underground railroad of rebellious religions remember when people worshipped God instead of the Afterfat.
As Annie, an anorexic, and her friend Kelly, who is so massive she can barely walk, find out, the tender promises of the Dedicated Sisters are fulfilled by forced feedings and enforced starvation in hidden prisons.
As middle-aged Jeremy discovers, Sylphania is a concentration camp where failure to lose weight and tone up leads to brutal punishment.
The Rev. Earl's public sympathy for the overweight conceals a private contempt . . . and, beneath that, a terrible longing known only to a select few.
The inevitable decay of old age is the only thing keeping mankind from reaching perfection. Luckily, Reverend Earl has a plan that will take care of that . . . .

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:45 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

TV says it. Magazines say it. American society commands it. You must be thin. You must be young. Fad diets. Fat-purging pills. Fitness clubs. Liposuction. Breast implants. Steroids. In the tomorrow of Thinner Than Thou, the cult of the body has become the one true religion. The Dedicated Sisters are a religious order sworn to help anorexic, bulimic, and morbidly obese youth. Throughout the land, houses of worship have been replaced by the health clubs of the Crossed Triceps. And through hypnotically powerful evangelical infomercials, the Reverend Earl preaches the heaven of the Afterfat, where you will look like a Greek god and eat anything you want. Just sign over your life savings and come to Sylphania, the most luxurious weight-loss spa in the world, where the Reverend himself will personally supervise your attainment of physical perfection. But the glory of youth and thinness that America worships conceals a hidden world where teens train for the competitive eating circuit, where fat porn and obese strippers feed people's dark desires, and where an underground railroad of rebellious religions remember when people worshipped God instead of the Afterfat. As Annie, an anorexic, and her friend Kelly, who is so massive she can barely walk, find out, the tender promises of the Dedicated Sisters are fulfilled by forced feedings and enforced starvation in hidden prisons. As middle-aged Jeremy discovers, Sylphania is a concentration camp where failure to lose weight and tone up leads to brutal punishment. The Rev. Earl's public sympathy for the overweight conceals a private contempt -and, beneath that, a terrible longing known only to a select few. The inevitable decay of old age is the only thing keeping mankind from reaching perfection. Luckily, Reverend Earl has a plan that will take care of that.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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