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The Taming of the Shrew (The New Folger…
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The Taming of the Shrew (The New Folger Library Shakespeare) (edition 2004)

by William Shakespeare

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Member:Nihil.Obstat
Title:The Taming of the Shrew (The New Folger Library Shakespeare)
Authors:William Shakespeare
Info:Simon & Schuster (2004), Mass Market Paperback, 304 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare

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» See also 231 mentions

English (56)  Dutch (2)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (1)  French (1)  All languages (62)
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
It's bawdy and crass; juvenile humor. I guess this explains why I enjoyed it in high school, but didn't enjoy it as much as an adult. ( )
  VhartPowers | Dec 27, 2018 |
I know it's about male chauvinist pigs, but I thought the parts that weren't totally misogynistic were actually pretty witty and enjoyable. ( )
  inescapableabby | Nov 28, 2018 |
As always, a great edition from the Arden publishers. ( )
  therebelprince | Oct 30, 2018 |
I had to read this one when I was in high school for an AP Lit course (man, I hated that course). Lit teachers have so many opportunities to choose some really amazing, relevant lit, and while I think Shakespeare is still relevant today, the way this book was taught was miserable. There were moments when the discussions in class were interesting, but it wasn't any thanks to the instructor or the play itself, I don't think. Of course, in high school fashion we watched the movie afterwards, and I found I enjoyed it better (and actually understood the play better, too). It was okay, but not one of my favorites among the Shakespeare pile of plays. ( )
  justagirlwithabook | Aug 1, 2018 |
This is a deeply troubling and often frankly misogynistic play, and I'm not here to defend those aspects of it. However I saw a version of it years ago that turned the misogyny on its head in a way that I thought was interesting, and perhaps truer to the many levels on which Shakespeare worked. It was a "Shakespeare in the Park" production, in New York, starring Morgan Freeman and Tracey Ullman, and you can imagine how fantastic that was. The best part was how they did the end of the play--that long, troubling speech by Kate where she prostrates herself before Petruchio and declares her obedience. What the director of that production realized, brilliantly, is that the speech goes on way, way too long! In fact, it becomes self-parody, a way for Kate to mock Petruchio with the words he wants to hear. Tracey Ullman played it to perfection. She kept pausing in the speech, goading Morgan Freeman into thinking she was done, and then she piled on some more, and then kept pausing and piling on until it was clear she was making fun of him, thereby undermining everything she was saying. It was utterly brilliant and has become my "gold standard" for how to perform--and understand--the play. ( )
1 vote MichaelBarsa | Dec 17, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (281 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
William Shakespeareprimary authorall editionscalculated
Baudissin, Wolf Heinrich GrafTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bergin, Thomas GoddardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bevington, David M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Díaz-Plaja, AuroraAdaptersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gollancz, IsrealPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harrison, George BEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heilman, Robert BechtoldEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hodgdon, BarbaraEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jervis, Gerald C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kidnie, M.J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oliver, Harold JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Papp, JosephForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Quiller-Couch, ArthurEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Raffel, BurtonEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thompson, AnnEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Webster, MargaretContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, Louis B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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People/Characters
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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Tranio, since for the great desire I had
To see fair Padua, nursery of arts,
I am arrived for fruitful Lombardy,
The pleasant garden of great Italy;
And by my father's love and leave am arm'd
With his good will and thy good company,
My trusty servant, well approved in all,
Here let us breathe and haply institute
A course of learning and ingenious studies.
Quotations
He that runs fastest gets the ring.
Signior Hortensio, 'twixt such friends as we
Few words suffice; and therefore, if thou know
One rich enough to be Petruchio's wife,
As wealth is burden of my wooing dance,
Be she as foul as was Florentius' love,
As old as Sibyl and as curst and shrewd
As Socrates' Xanthippe, or a worse,
She moves me not, or not removes, at least,
Affection's edge in me, were she as rough
As are the swelling Adriatic seas:
I come to wive it wealthily in Padua;
If wealthily, then happily in Padua.
Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?
Have I not in my time heard lions roar?
Have I not heard the sea puff'd up with winds
Rage like an angry boar chafed with sweat?
Have I not heard great ordnance in the field,
And heaven's artillery thunder in the skies?
Have I not in a pitched battle heard
Loud 'larums, neighing steeds, and trumpets' clang?
And do you tell me of a woman's tongue,
That gives not half so great a blow to hear
As will a chestnut in a farmer's fire?
Tush, tush! fear boys with bugs.
Father, and wife, and gentlemen, adieu;
I will to Venice; Sunday comes apace:
We will have rings and things and fine array;
And kiss me, Kate, we will be married o'Sunday.
Why, Petruchio is coming in a new hat and an old
jerkin, a pair of old breeches thrice turned, a pair
of boots that have been candle-cases, one buckled,
another laced, an old rusty sword ta'en out of the
town-armory, with a broken hilt, and chapeless;
with two broken points: his horse hipped with an
old mothy saddle and stirrups of no kindred;
besides, possessed with the glanders and like to mose
in the chine; troubled with the lampass, infected
with the fashions, full of wingdalls, sped with
spavins, rayed with yellows, past cure of the fives,
stark spoiled with the staggers, begnawn with the
bots, swayed in the back and shoulder-shotten;
near-legged before and with, a half-chequed bit
and a head-stall of sheeps leather which, being
restrained to keep him from stumbling, hath been
often burst and now repaired with knots; one girth
six time pieced and a woman's crupper of velure,
which hath two letters for her name fairly set down
in studs, and here and there pieced with packthread.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This work is for the complete The Taming of the Shrew only. Do not combine this work with abridgements, adaptations or simplifications (such as "Shakespeare Made Easy"), Cliffs Notes or similar study guides, or anything else that does not contain the full text. Do not include any video recordings. Additionally, do not combine this with other plays.
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Haiku summary
Brilliant comedy,
A battle of the sexes,
Is Kate truly tamed?
(hillaryrose7)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 074347757X, Mass Market Paperback)

Folger Shakespeare Library

The world's leading center for Shakespeare studies

Each edition includes:

• Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• Scene-by-scene plot summaries

• A key to famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare's language

• An essay by an outstanding scholar providing a modern perspective on the play

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library's vast holdings of rare books

Essay by Karen Newman

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare's printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:47 -0400)

(see all 10 descriptions)

A revised edition of the comedy covers the playwright's life and theater, an introduction to the play, sources, critical commentaries, and stage and film productions

(summary from another edition)

» see all 30 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140714510, 0451526791, 0141015519

Yale University Press

An edition of this book was published by Yale University Press.

» Publisher information page

Sourcebooks MediaFusion

An edition of this book was published by Sourcebooks MediaFusion.

» Publisher information page

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