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Macbeth by William Shakespeare
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Macbeth (original 1623; edition 2011)

by William Shakespeare

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14,806106133 (4)365
Member:hazzabamboo
Title:Macbeth
Authors:William Shakespeare
Info:Simon & Brown (2011), Paperback, 126 pages
Collections:Drama, Teaching
Rating:*****
Tags:c17, classic, English, death (murder), Scotland, Shakespeare, tragedy, witches, monarchy, ambition, supernatural, prophecies, women (strong), period (Renaissance), period (Jacobean), greed, power, guilt

Work details

Macbeth by William Shakespeare (1623)

  1. 91
    Hamlet by William Shakespeare (Pattty)
    Pattty: Si te gustó Hamlet seguro te gustará Macbeth, que es una historia buena y mucho más "macabra"
  2. 53
    Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett (Tallulah_Rose)
    Tallulah_Rose: "Wyrd Sisters" is a parody of "Macbeth", so everyone who enjoyed "Macbeth" might also like "Wyrd Sisters". On the other hand it's essential to have read "Macbeth" before reading "Wyrd Sisters".
  3. 10
    Richard III [Norton Critical Edition] by William Shakespeare (kara.shamy)
  4. 00
    King Lear by William Shakespeare (kara.shamy)
  5. 00
    The Witch by Thomas Middleton (aethercowboy)
  6. 00
    Balladyna by Juliusz Słowacki (sirparsifal)
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» See also 365 mentions

English (98)  Spanish (3)  French (2)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (106)
Showing 1-5 of 98 (next | show all)
I probably don’t need to go into too much detail about the plot of Macbeth as most people are aware of what it is about. The Tragedy of Macbeth is obviously a tragedy the legendary playwright William Shakespeare, and is often considered his darkest play. Set in Scotland, the play explores the destructive psychological and political effects that form when evil is used as a method of gaining power. It is generally believed that this was written between the Elizabethan Era and the Jacobean Era, around about 1599 to 1606.

The Elizabethan Era was generally regarded as a ‘golden age’ for England. Colonialism was strong, England has dominating the seas (defeating the Spanish Armada) and there was great commercial wealth to be found in the ‘New World’. However the Jacobean Era was different; James VI of Scotland inherited the throne in 1603 and things seemed to change drastically. The ‘Gunpowder Plot’ of 1605 failed to assassinate the king and the plotters were executed. This possibly led to the King commissioning a new translation of the bible; the ‘King James Version’ was first published in 1611.

The reason I talk about these two eras is that there seems to be a connection to Macbeth. Set in Scotland, Macbeth seems to reflect the atmosphere of the Jacobean Era and there has been speculation to the play alluding to the Gunpowder Plot. However to try to draw direct correlations between Macbeth and the political situations of the time would require a lot of speculation. I just added this information into this review because there are connections that I feel would be relevant or interesting to readers of this play.

I was lucky enough to have experienced Macbeth as a play being performed before ever reading it for my university course. There is something about the performance that was essential to critically reading the text; I already understood the plot, the tone and the overall emotions behind the words and this allowed me to grasp a lot more out of the play. One thing that I picked up in reading Macbeth that I seemed to have missed was the importance of gender roles within the play.

Let’s look at one example which appears in Act 1 scene 7. Within the scene Macbeth is having second thoughts about killing the king and taking the crown. Lady Macbeth scolds Macbeth and manipulates him to go through with his original plan. How does she do this? Simply by calling him a coward and telling him he is not a man. She even suggested that she is more of a man and stated she would kill her own child; taking that child from her breast and smash its head against a wall.

There are other themes that are prominent within Macbeth, but the idea of masculinity verses femininity seems to stick with me the most. This idea that claiming you are more of a man than someone else is a common occurrence but the way Shakespeare presented this graphic manipulation really stuck with me. Obviously feminist literary studies would have a field day with this play. I have been picking more and more issues to do with feminism within literature, but I would rather be looking at Marxism or psychoanalyst; why does this keep happening?

Macbeth is this wonderfully dark play that has a lot to offer; I can see why Shakespeare remains a legend. I am not really sure how to review a play like this; there is so much to talk about with plot and theme, however I would rather people discover that for themselves. I do feel like this review turned into something that would resemble a Jackson Pollock with random thoughts flicked onto a page but I wanted to get some of my thoughts down.

This review originally appeared on my blog: http://literary-exploration.com/2014/12/04/tragedy-of-macbeth-by-william-shakesp... ( )
  knowledge_lost | Dec 6, 2014 |
The ending is the best. That and what always stuck with me was the image of the floating dagger. ( )
  locriian | Oct 27, 2014 |
Truly among the best of the Bard's dramas. Full of great dramatic images -- the supernatural, passion for power and scenes of great intensity. It's easier to follow than King Lear because it moves forward in a straight line with no sub-plots. The ending, with images juxtaposed through the various almost overlapping scenes adds to the dramatic tension. ( )
  AliceAnna | Oct 22, 2014 |
I read Lady Macbeth's part at school.

That should tell you all that you need to know about me. ( )
  humblewomble | Oct 19, 2014 |
We have much to learn from Maestro's use of language. In Macbeth, it is surprisingly accessible and fast-paced.

I marvel at his choice at what occurs offstage, like the murder of Duncan. Yet the murder of Macduff's family, including children, happens for all to see. It is postulated that the Duncan scene was cut by someone else. But it actually does something interesting. It increases Macbeth's increasingly murderous character, intensifies his evil as a progression in his paranoia.

I have many more thoughts , of course, but I must stew. Perhaps I'll return to solidify my thoughts on this masterly work of art. ( )
1 vote DanielAlgara | Sep 26, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 98 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (208 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shakespeare, Williamprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Andrews, John F.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Barnet, SylvanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bate, JonathanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bevington, David M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Books, PennyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boynton, Robert W.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Braunmuller, A. R.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chambers, E. K.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cumming, AlanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
D'Agostino, NemiEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dali, SalvadorIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duffy, John DennisIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Elloway, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eriksson, Göran O.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Farjeon, HerbertEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
French, Charles W.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Furness, Horace HowardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gassman, VittorioEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibson, RexEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gill, RomaEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Groom, BernardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gundersheimer, WernerPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hallqvist, Britt G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harbage, AlfredDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harrison, George B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hudson, Henry N.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hunter, G. K.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jones, RichardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kittredge, George LymanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
LaMar, Virginia A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lambert, Daniel HenryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Leary, Daniel J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lott, BernardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mack, MaynardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McBeath, H.C.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mowat, Barbara A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Muir, KennethEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Orgel, StephenEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rasmussen, EricEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ridley, M. R.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rolfe, William J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rolfe, William JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rowe, KatherineEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rumboll, F.C.H.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rutter, Carol ChillingtonEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sagarra, Josep M. deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thurber, SamuelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verity, A. W.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Viegas-Faria, BeatrizTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werstine, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Williams, William ProctorEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, John DoverEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wood, StanleyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, Louis B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Macbeth ( [2006]IMDb)
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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
When shall we three meet again
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
Quotations
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.
By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes.
Out, damned spot! out, I say!
Yet do I fear thy nature;

It is too full o' the milk of human kindness.
The attempt and not the deed
Confounds us.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
One of Shakespeare's most classic tragedies, Macbeth is about the murder of the king of Scotland by one of his most honored Thanes. The book has a theme of deception, betrayal, and then has a surprising redemption at the end. I enjoyed this more than Julius Caesar because of the character of Lady Macbeth and when I read it, I understood it quicker than I was able to follow Julius Caesar.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743477103, Mass Market Paperback)

Each edition includes:

• Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• Scene-by-scene plot summaries

• A key to famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare's language

• An essay by an outstanding scholar providing a modern perspective on the play

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library's vast holdings of rare books

Essay by Susan Snyder

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare's printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs. For more information, visit www.folger.edu.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:55:29 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Presents Shakespeare's drama about a man who kills the king of Scotland in order to claim the throne for himself, and includes explanatory notes, plot summaries, a key to notable lines and phrases, and other reference information.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 55 descriptions

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3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0451526775, 0140714782, 0141013699

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