HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

White Queen (Aleutian Trilogy, Book 1) by…
Loading...

White Queen (Aleutian Trilogy, Book 1) (original 1991; edition 1998)

by Gwyneth Jones

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
218853,416 (3.04)35
Member:salimbol
Title:White Queen (Aleutian Trilogy, Book 1)
Authors:Gwyneth Jones
Info:Gollancz (1998), Paperback, 320 pages
Collections:Once owned, Read but unowned
Rating:****
Tags:novels, science fiction, aliens, gender issues, female authors, 20th century books, 2013 reading

Work details

White Queen by Gwyneth Jones (1991)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 35 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Set in the near future, two journalists try to break the story of an alien landing. Although the characters were well-developed, the technology was casually used and often gritty, and the aliens quite alien, I just didn't like this book much.
( )
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
Only the second book I've ever given up on (Appleseed by John Clute was the other) - just couldn't care about the story or the characters. ( )
  Superenigmatix | Jan 16, 2016 |
Tiptree winner 1991 ( )
  SChant | May 8, 2013 |
As intelligent and uncompromising as any of Gwyneth Jones' other works, this boasts the creation of a* truly* alien society, and examines the tragic misunderstandings that ensue when humanity and aliens make first contact while labouring under some fundamentally flawed assumptions. It has her usual searing and frequently discomfort-inducing treatments of politics and sexuality, and some solid characterisation and carefully-considered world-building.
I admire the hell out of her writing, but (small confession) I don't necessarily enjoy reading her books all that much. However, she *always* provides me with food for thought, and that is why I'll continue to read her work. ( )
  salimbol | Feb 25, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gwyneth Jonesprimary authorall editionscalculated
Farren, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 057560378X, Paperback)

It's 2038 and the earth has been devastated by tectonic shifts accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The U.S. has undergone a socialist revolution, retro-viruses are rampant and most technology relies on a powerful organic "clay" instead of microprocessors. When aliens land near American-exile Johnny Guglio's adopted African home, Braemar Wilson, a cutthroat reporter, befriends him to get a jump on the story. Though no one knows the alien's intent, White Queen, an anti-alien group, begins working to undermine human trust. Even as ambassadors from both worlds talk, Braemar and Johnny must work together find themselves in a unique position to uncover the truth. The book won the 1991 James Tiptree Jr. Award.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:48 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
23 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.04)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 6
2.5 1
3 16
3.5 1
4 10
4.5 1
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 110,747,960 books! | Top bar: Always visible