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The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World (edition 2009)

by Dalai Lama, Howard Cutler M.D.

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884137,094 (3.82)9
Member:Deern
Title:The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World
Authors:Dalai Lama
Other authors:Howard Cutler M.D.
Info:Harmony (2009), Hardcover, 368 pages
Collections:Kindle, Your library
Rating:***1/2
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The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World by H. H. the 14th Dalai Lama

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  velvetink | Mar 31, 2013 |
Not sure why the Dalai Lama's name is featured so prominently in this book. Perhaps fewer than 50 pages of the book contain material directly from him and the remaining 275 pages are narrative and 'interpretation' from the other author.

While the book covers some interesting and relevant topics, I feel it would have been much more effective in a more concise presentation. ( )
1 vote rcampoamor | Mar 21, 2010 |
Blending common sense and modern psychiatry, "The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World" applies Buddhist tradition to twenty-first-century struggles in a relevant way. The result is a wise approach to dealing with human problems that is both optimistic and realistic, even in the most challenging times.

How can we expect to find happiness and meaning in our lives when the modern world seems such an unhappy place?

His Holiness the Dalai Lama has suffered enormously throughout his life, yet he always seems to be smiling and serene. How does he do it? In "The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World", Dr. Howard C. Cutler (a psychiatrist, best selling author and speaker) walks readers through the Dalai Lama's philosophy on how to achieve peace of mind and come to terms with life's inherent suffering. Together, the two examine the roots of many of the problems facing the world and show us how we can approach these calamities in a way that alleviates suffering, and helps us along in our personal quests to be happy. Through stories, meditations, and in-depth conversations, the Dalai Lama teaches readers to identify the cultural influences and ways of thinking that lead to personal unhappiness, making sense of the hardships we face personally, as well as the afflictions suffered by others.
  Saraswati_Library | Mar 21, 2010 |
I first really learned about the Dalai Lama while I was an undergraduate student taking "Introduction to Buddhism." As part of the class, we read a marvelous, if short, anthology edited by Sidney Piburn called The Dalai Lama, A Policy of Kindness which collected writings both by and about the Dalai Lama. Ever since, I have become a great admirer of His Holiness and his work and have been meaning to read more. Probably one of the most familiar books he participated in was The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living with Howard C. Cutler. I haven't read the book, but it was crucial in exposing the American public to the Dalai Lama and his philosophies. The first venture between the two men was followed by The Art of Happiness at Work. The third book in the series, The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World, is touted as "the long-awaited sequel." Written ten years after the original, I didn't hesitate at all when I was offered a copy to review.

Where The Art of Happiness dealt with internal, personal happiness, The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World focuses on the intersection of an individual's happiness and the world and society as a whole. Cutler and the Dalai Lama address how it is possible to live in a troubled world--one filled with war, fear, violence, and prejudice--while maintaining a positive outlook, genuine happiness, and hope while at the same time changing society for the better and increasing the overall happiness of people worldwide. The book is divided into three major sections--Part One: I, Us, and Them; Part Two: Violence versus Dialogue; and Part Three: Happiness in a Troubled World.

The Dalai Lama and Cutler provide practical and definite methods and techniques for increasing personal happiness in such a way that benefits society as well. Cutler goes on to support the Dalai Lama's philosophical teachings with with personal anecdotes and experiences, psychological case studies, and scientific experiments. I particularly enjoyed learning about current and ongoing research, however, Cutler never seemed to go into as much detail as I would have liked (sometimes to the extent it would be difficult to track down a specific study mentioned). But the information and findings are very interesting nonetheless. The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World is an exceptionally approachable book. Cutler's writing is very readable and concepts are introduced and explained in an easily understood and accessible way.

Ultimately, I was actually rather disappointed with The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World and I am saddened by that fact. And it really is a pity because the book has some very important lessons and valuable points that it makes. But, unfortunately, it is also extremely repetitive and tedious. Cutler's technique of introducing a topic (this is what I will be talking about), addressing that topic (now I'm talking about it), and then reviewing and summarizing the topic (this is what I just talked about) can be very effective, especially in formal essays, articles, lectures, and addresses, but made the book feel unnecessarily drawn out. Cutler also tended to do this in his interviews with the Dalai Lama which often seemed more like he was having a discussion with himself rather than with His Holiness who ended up contributing significantly less (at least by word count) to the conversations. This, I think, is where my expectations gave me the most trouble--I was hoping for a book that was more focused on the Dalai Lama and his teachings than The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World ended up being.

Experiments in Reading ( )
  PhoenixTerran | Jan 6, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0767920643, Hardcover)

Blending common sense and modern psychiatry, The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World applies Buddhist tradition to twenty-first-century struggles in a relevant way. The result is a wise approach to dealing with human problems that is both optimistic and realistic, even in the most challenging times.

How can we expect to find happiness and meaning in our lives when the modern world seems such an unhappy place?

His Holiness the Dalai Lama has suffered enormously throughout his life, yet he always seems to be smiling and serene. How does he do it? In The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World, Dr. Cutler walks readers through the Dalai Lama's philosophy on how to achieve peace of mind and come to terms with life's inherent suffering. Together, the two examine the roots of many of the problems facing the world and show us how we can approach these calamities in a way that alleviates suffering, and helps us along in our personal quests to be happy. Through stories, meditations, and in-depth conversations, the Dalai Lama teaches readers to identify the cultural influences and ways of thinking that lead to personal unhappiness, making sense of the hardships we face personally, as well as the afflictions suffered by others.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:46:58 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Draws on the Tibetan leader's insights to reveal how Buddhist traditions may alleviate twenty-first-century problems, sharing stories, meditations, and conversations to identify cultural sources of unhappiness.

(summary from another edition)

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