HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Wind Done Gone: A Novel by Alice Randall
Loading...

The Wind Done Gone: A Novel (2001)

by Alice Randall

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4612122,528 (3.01)32
  1. 10
    Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell (lquilter)
    lquilter: This work is a "retelling" of Gone With the Wind, from the perspective of Scarlett's half-sister -- who is a slave. The Mitchell estate chose to sue for copyright infringement, but lost because the court recognized that this work is an important critical commentary on the original, and the beliefs that animated the original.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 32 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
The premise for THE WIND DONE GONE was so promising, yet it turns out not to be powerful or even appealing.

It overflows with digressions, underdeveloped characters, and none that were compelling or intriguing. ( )
  m.belljackson | Oct 10, 2017 |
(14) I have meant to read this since it came out, though I was afraid it would spoil the most treasured book of my youth. It certainly didn't spoil it, but it also didn't hold a candle to GWTW. Though I understand GWTW is whitewashed and culturally insensitive, it is still magical. I have lived my life by 'Other's' credo: "I won't think of this right now, I will think of it tomorrow. Tomorrow's another day." This is Scarlett's mulatto half-sister - the love-child of Mammy and Scarlett's father called 'Planter' in this novel.

Much of the writing was in vernacular. Cynara was conflicted between her two identities, at times she wrote like a former slave and at times she wrote like an educated woman. I, indeed, loved the revelations and some of the deeper questions these revelations raised. What does it mean to be black? Is it a color, a state of mind, or a legacy? The reason for the lukewarm rating is the attempt at lyricism in the writing. These almost nonsensical sentences repeated again and again hinting at some truth that seemed either histrionic, obvious, or too elusive to grasp. The only writers I know that really pull this off are Toni Morrison and Faulkner. Here it felt contrived and annoying. Sometimes you just have to tell a story and dispense with too many attempts to make everything swim with meaning and profundity.

I enjoyed this to some degree but was glad when it ended. If the characters had not been based on GWTW it would be a 2 star rating. ( )
  jhowell | Mar 18, 2017 |
This is the first work of revisionist literature I've ever read. It's not really a parody (which they must have had to call it for legal reasons, after Margaret Mitchell's estate sued to stop its publication) or even a pastiche of Gone With the Wind. Just as revisionist history describes historical events from the perspective of those usually left out of the story, this book re-imagines some of the characters in GWTW as seen through the eyes of Scarlett O'Hara's illegitimate mixed race half sister, imagined by Randall as the child of O'Hara and Mammy. It's a brave and wild idea, a kind of creative re-purposing, and GWTW's endemic racism fully deserves the take down it gets here. But TWDG doesn't completely fly as an extended work--it needs more stories to be told in-depth, maybe more voices besides the narrator's to really go head to head with Mitchell's epic fantasy of the noble Confederacy. Still, it's one of those books that, now that it exists, seems essential. Amazing that it has the power to make GWTW fans uncomfortable, even today. Lotta denial still swirling around out there, maybe. ( )
2 vote CSRodgers | May 3, 2014 |
I chose three instead of four stars mostly for the writing itself. It's written like a journal, so the character development is nil initially, and it can be a bit confusing.

However, I do think everyone should take the time to read this. The perspective is one I can't even fathom as a white woman living in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. I know historical fiction isn't everyone's bag, but it is a good read once you get into it and the story develops. ( )
  sarahlizfits | Apr 16, 2013 |
Well-written and spare, this novel re-imagines Margaret Mitchell's [b:Gone With The Wind|18405|Gone With The Wind|Margaret Mitchell|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1166913011s/18405.jpg|3358283] world through the eyes of Cynara. Cynara is Scarlett's half-sister, sired by Mr. O'Hara and mothered by Mammy. While it's powerful and affecting, it does leave Cynara a cypher and shows us all the other characters in relationship to her. Interesting. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Non Sum Qualis Eram Bonae Sub Regno Cynarae.
Last night, ah, yesternight, betwixt her lips and mine
there fell thy shadow, Cynara! thy breath was shed
Upon my soul between the kisses and the wine;
And I was desolate and sick of an old passion,
Yea, I was desolate and bowed my head:
I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion.

All night upon mine heart I felt her warm heart beat,
Night-long within mine arms in love and sleep she lay;
Sure the kisses of her bought red mouth were sweet;
But I was desolate and sick of an old passion,
When I awoke and found the dawn was gray:
I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion.

I have forgot much, Cynara! gone with the wind,
Flung roses, roses riotously with the throng,
Dancing, to put thy pale, lost lilies out of mind;
But I was desolate and sick of an old passion,
Yea, all the time, because the dance was long:
I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion.

I cried for madder music and for stronger wine,
But when the feast is finished and the lamps expire,
Then falls thy shadow, Cynara! the night is thine;
And I am desolate and sick of an old passion,
Yea, hungry for the lips of my desire
I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion.

Ernest Dowson, 1867-1900 (title from Horace's Odes, translates: I am not as I was under the reign of the good Cynara)
Dedication
First words
Today is the anniversary of my birth.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0618219064, Paperback)

In this daring and provocative literary parody which has captured the interest and imagination of a nation, Alice Randall explodes the world created in GONE WITH THE WIND, a work that more than any other has defined our image of the antebellum South. Taking sharp aim at the romanticized, whitewashed mythology perpetrated by this southern classic, Randall has ingeniously conceived a multilayered, emotionally complex tale of her own - that of Cynara, the mulatto half-sister, who, beautiful and brown and born into slavery, manages to break away from the damaging world of the Old South to emerge into full life as a daughter, a lover, a mother, a victor. THE WIND DONE GONE is a passionate love story, a wrenching portrait of a tangled mother-daughter relationship, and a book that "celebrates a people's emancipation not only from bondage but also from history and myth, custom and stereotype" (San Antonio Express-News).

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:05:18 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

A parody of Gone with the wind, this novel tells the story of Cynara, the mulatto half-sister born into slavery who eventually triumphs.

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
20 avail.
13 wanted
1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.01)
0.5 5
1 8
1.5 2
2 8
2.5 1
3 39
3.5 4
4 20
4.5 3
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 118,649,457 books! | Top bar: Always visible