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Are You My Mother? by P. D. Eastman
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Are You My Mother? (1960)

by P. D. Eastman

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Showing 1-5 of 146 (next | show all)
This is an excellent book for a beginning reader. There are only 1-2 sentences on each page and the words are mainly simple sight-words. This being said, the language was also clear and concise. Important parts were also repeated twice, such as "My mother is not the dog or the hen. My mother is not the dog or the cow." This repetition will help the reader remember key ideas from the story as we help the baby bird search for his mother. The plot is sequential and suspenseful. With each page the reader is worried that the bird may not find his mother, or that he may mistake someone else to actually be his mother! The plot was also very organized which helps the reader to understand the series of events. The illustrations tie the story together. On each page we can see that the bird and, whoever he is asking, are not related. For example, when the baby bird asks the tractor if it his his mother, the reader can see that these are two completely different characters, so we understand that the two are not related, but the baby bird cannot. The big idea of this story is to keep on trying until you get it right. This bird was persistent and in the end, he found his mother. ( )
  kwhite18 | Apr 20, 2015 |
This book is great for those kids just starting out reading. It has big letters, and the pictures also help aid in telling the story. This is great because sometimes children will need that assistance. This also helps put words to images, different animals, etc.
  loross | Mar 16, 2015 |
There are several reasons why I like this book. First, I enjoy the organization of the plot. After the baby bird wakes up, the series of events he encounters are not only funny, but practical. He begins on land where he finds other animals. After the animals, he begins looking elsewhere like boats and planes. This then leads to the crain, which then puts the bird back in it's nest. I like how this element brings the story full circle. The second reason I like this book is for its illustrations. More specifically the characters facial expression. For example, while searching for his mother, baby bird looks sad. The other animals look confused as to why a bird is asking if she is his mother. Finally, when baby bird is reunited with his mother they are both smiling with joy. The overall message of this story is even when your scared and lonely, things will always get better. ( )
1 vote acaine1 | Mar 6, 2015 |
I remember this book as a boy. The story is simple with a baby bird who looks for his mother. He mistakes a cat, a rusted out car, a boat and a Snort! (among others), but no worries. In the end he finds Momma.

This book might be somewhat too long for very young readers as there is not a lot of text in the beggining. However, if they can manage to hang in, the delivery is worth it. Not a stellar read, but still fun.

In my mind, the main idea here is to not be afraid of strangers. Which, in this day and age, is a nice throw back. ( )
  pcadig1 | Mar 5, 2015 |
I really enjoy this book. I feel this book is great for the grades K-2. The story uses repetition of "Are you my mother?" throughout the book. The use of Repetition is a key component in teaching children words/phrases. Another reason why I love this book is the use of illustration. Each page has the image of a little bird on one and another animal on the other. This is great to show compare and contrast with the bird. The illustrations also show great expression in the animals. For example, the little bird asks a kitten "Are you my mother?" the picture shows a confused expression in the kittens face. The central message and big idea of this book is to never give up searching and you will find your loved one. ( )
  kfrey4 | Feb 17, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 146 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Dedication
To My Mother
First words
A mother bird sat on her egg.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
The author of this book is actually P. D. Eastman.
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Are You My Mother? follows a confused baby bird who's been denied the experience of imprinting as he asks cows, planes, and steam shovels the Big Question. In the end he is happily reunited with his maternal parent in a glorious moment of recognition. Ages 4-8.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0394800184, Hardcover)

This is the classic from which many of our staff first learned to read, starting us on a path of unremitting bibliophilia. Are You My Mother? follows a confused baby bird who's been denied the experience of imprinting as he asks cows, planes, and steam shovels the Big Question. In the end he is happily reunited with his maternal parent in a glorious moment of recognition.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:57:58 -0400)

(see all 11 descriptions)

Never having seen his mother, a baby bird makes humorous mistakes trying to find her.

» see all 8 descriptions

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