HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Spectacular Now by Tim Tharp
Loading...

The Spectacular Now

by Tim Tharp

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3823728,205 (3.58)6
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
WHAT IS IT ABOUT?

“The Spectacular Now” by Tim Tharp is a highly entertaining and surprisingly insightful story of a teenage alcoholic. A high school senior Sutter Keely is exactly a person you want to have at your party - he is hilarious, spontaneous and charming. Although an algebra teacher is giving him a hard time, his girlfriend wants to break up and his relationships with his parents are far away from perfect, nothing can bring Sutter down because he and his best friend whiskey don’t worry about the past or the future, they live in the spectacular now. One morning after one of such spectacular nows Sutter wakes up on the lawn in an unfamiliar neighborhood. That’s where he meets Aimee, a mousy nerd whose self-confidence is practically nonexistent. But fear not, Sutterman with his spiked 7UP is here to change Aimee for better… or for worse.

MY THOUGHTS:

1) On the story:

“The Spectacular Now” is hilarious and fast-moving. The whole story is told from Sutter’s perspective and it feels like you are actually in his head. I was also pleasantly surprised by the depth of this book because I was kind of expecting something like “A Walk to Remember” by Nicholas Sparks (you know, one of those unlikely romances with a heartbreaking ending). The ending is indeed heartbreaking, but absolutely not what I was predicting. I didn’t really like the ending though because it is quite depressing and hopeless. However, it is actually the ending that makes this book so good, partly because it is so heartrending and partly because it is so realistic.

Relatable and multidimensional characters are another reason why the whole story is so deeply moving. I could really understand all personages and their motives. For example, I really cared about Sutter and found myself rooting for him rather than judging him. Just like in real life, in this story nothing is simply black or white, there are no absolute heroes nor villains.

2) On writing:

Tharp’s writing is incredibly engaging and flows effortlessly. None of the dialogues feel forced, none of the language, which is packed with teen slang, sounds artificial. Although the story is told from the first person’s perspective, other characters are very well developed. Finally, the message is loud and clear but the author doesn’t judge or preach; he just invites us to Sutter’s world and leaves us here to explore, think and feel on our own.

VERDICT: The story reads like a breeze, but the message is harrowing and it will haunt you long after you finish the book. It’s a great read for both teens and adults! ( )
1 vote AgneJakubauskaite | Sep 12, 2014 |
Oh my God! Where has this book been all my life?! Why am I just now reading it?!? This is hands down the most honest look at teenage "romance." There aren't knights in shining armor. People have flaws, there is no perfect relationship. There is no happy ending, this is a real look at how many guys are... not perfect! Instead of the usual girl meets perfect boy (ie knight in shining armor) this is the story of a boy who isn't perfect. He's a funny likable guy and girls love him, but he's not a good guy and he knows it. The whole time you root for bad boy Sutter to turn his life around and be the boyfriend that Aimee loves and deserves. But life isn't always that cut and dry! People have real flaws to work with! Sutter is a high school student who drinks from sun up to sun down, he's always the life of the party. Girls love him, guys want to be him. He's so at ease with everything and takes nothing seriously. He has no life ambitions and just lives from day to day. Then comes Aimee a shy, quiet nerd, Sutter thinks that she can be his charity case and he'll give her the skills and confidence that she so desperately needs. But of course that's not how it works does it? They start to fall in love with each other. She brings out a new side in Sutter that he's not sure he likes.

Soo funny, witty, honest, and heartbreaking. I loved this book and the movie adaptation of it. Miles Teller was THE PERFECT choice to portray Sutter. A definite must read and a must see! ( )
  ecataldi | Jul 4, 2014 |
“Goodbye, I say, goodbye, as I disappear little by little into the middle of the middle of my own spectacular now.”

I love this book! Sutter is such a great character. There is so much going on in his life but he chooses to embrace the weird and the "now". He just doesn't care about tomorrow. But all of that gradually change when he met Aimee. I'm a sucker for YA romance and at first I expected for this to be one but no, it's not. Still, it's such a good book about self-discovery and character development.

“Besides, it doesn’t matter if it’s real. It never does with dreams. They aren’t anything anyway but lifesavers to cling to so you don’t drown. Life is an ocean, and most everyone’s hanging on to some kind of dream to keep afloat” ( )
  PamZaragoza | Jun 27, 2014 |
This is the story of Sutter, a high school senior with a drink problem. And a taking life seriously problem. His voice is reminiscent of the catcher in the rye in places. In spite of its lack of originality, for how many times will we hear the story of boy meets geeky girl, geeky girl makes boy realise he can be a better person, this is a nice telling of the story and Sutter is an interesting, if incredibly self-absorbed, protagonist. ( )
  cathymoore | May 17, 2014 |
Senior Sutter Keely has it all--a beautiful girlfriend, a weed-supplying best friend and plenty of booze to fill up the trunk of his car every weekend...at least until it all fell apart. After one night falling into a drunken stupor, Sutter wakes up on a stranger's lawn to the voice of AImee, a nerdy girl that Sutter decides to "save" from a life of unpopularity. I went into "The Spectacular Now" expecting it to be a classic bad-boy meets good-girl and is changed for the better, but I was completely wrong. I enjoyed the honesty of the book, but I just could not sympathize with Sutter's character. ( )
  TheMadHatters | Apr 17, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

In the last months of high school, charismatic eighteen-year-old Sutter Keely lives in the present, staying drunk or high most of the time, but that could change when starts working to boost the self-confidence of a classmate, Aimee.

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
36 wanted2 pay5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.58)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 7
2.5 4
3 24
3.5 8
4 33
4.5 3
5 16

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,944,816 books! | Top bar: Always visible