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The Glass Palace: A Novel by Amitav Ghosh
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The Glass Palace: A Novel (original 2000; edition 2002)

by Amitav Ghosh

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,389604,622 (3.83)138
"Tells of Rajkumar, a poor boy lifted on the tides of political and social chaos, who creates an empire in the Burmese teak forest. During the British invasion of 1885, when soldiers force the royal family out of the Glass Palace and into exile, Rajkumar befriends Dolly, the woman whose love will shape his life. He cannot forget her, and years later, as a rich man, he goes in search of her."--Jacket.… (more)
Member:itshellsparadise
Title:The Glass Palace: A Novel
Authors:Amitav Ghosh
Info:Random House Trade Paperbacks (2002), Paperback, 512 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Glass Palace by Amitav Ghosh (2000)

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    charlie68: Similar settings and themes.
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» See also 138 mentions

English (53)  Dutch (3)  German (2)  Danish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (60)
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
The frustrating thing about this book was that I enjoyed it. I dislike the style, too much history, not enough character development, too much telling and not enough showing. The book strays too far away from the emotions of the characters, but there' something about the writing that kept me reading.

It's a tale that passes through multiple generations of a sprawling family. There's something discomforting about attaching yourself to a character who grows old and eventually dies. It's a reminder that I too am growing older. One day I'll be old and grey and my life will pass into history. ( )
  Happenence | Oct 2, 2020 |
I was sorely tempted to review this in conjunction with Ishiguro's The Buried Giant, which if I had to put it in a genre, I would call historical fiction. Yet the two books could scarcely be more different. Ishiguro gives you an idea of a period, it's hazy, impressionistic. Ghosh is very precise about historical themes. The book is sweeping - panoramic - but his focus is not on detail. If one might call World War one, for instance, a 'detail', it is noted in passing, perhaps in no more than a sentence, whilst the process of logging teak in Burma (as it was for most of the story) is told in depth over various settings and periods.

rest here: https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2019/12/01/the-glass-palace-by-amita... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
A weaker book than many of his others, the settings are the most enticing elements, while I failed to connect with characters. It feels almost like a practice attempt for the Ibis trilogy - doesn't feel quite as rich in detail, despite his five years of research, nor do I find the voice of the characters quite as realistic. Here his characters seem unnaturally politically aware - their critique of the Empire, the INA or other things they come across during their migrations across South Asia, is spelled out much too clearly and obviously - rather than seeing it through their eyes and drawing your own conclusions (such as I felt you could do Deeti in Sea of Poppies) the characters are directly criticizing the political and other ills they're witnessing. Some characters (Dinu, Thibaw Min) and some parts of the book stand out though and I especially enjoyed the last ten or so chapters towards the end of the book. ( )
  linuskendall | Mar 22, 2020 |
good and readable. it has similar pacing inconsistency as circle of reason, another ghosh book. comparatively, i was more into the characters from circle of reason, but this was still enjoyable. makes me want to read more history. ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
This book was a very intense read.
While reading it, I realized that I hardly know anything about the history of India, Burma, Malaysia butsome common known facts. Not nearly enough to appreciate the history side of this book. But it did make me curious, got me ibterested and wanting to learn more.
The story the book is telling, about Rajkunar, his family and friends holds second place to the historical tale. At times the story was difficult to follow. Lots of places, lots of people that change names or use one of their given names in one country, the other in another. The story itself is one that could have happened anywhere, it's the historical part that made it interesting.

I'll be reading more by this writer, I liked his language :-) ( )
  BoekenTrol71 | Aug 5, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Amitav Ghoshprimary authorall editionscalculated
Besse, ChristianeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blommestein, AnkieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maier-Längsfeld, SabineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nadotti, AnnaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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To my father's memory
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There was only one person in the food-stall who knew exactly what that sound was rolling in across the plain, along the silver curve of the Irrawaddy, to the western wall of Mandalay's fort.
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"Tells of Rajkumar, a poor boy lifted on the tides of political and social chaos, who creates an empire in the Burmese teak forest. During the British invasion of 1885, when soldiers force the royal family out of the Glass Palace and into exile, Rajkumar befriends Dolly, the woman whose love will shape his life. He cannot forget her, and years later, as a rich man, he goes in search of her."--Jacket.

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