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Freedom of Expression by Archibald Cox
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Freedom of Expression

by Archibald Cox

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0674319133, Paperback)

Throughout his many careers Archibald Cox has been especially concerned with the Constitution and the unalienable rights of fellow citizens. In his latest book Cox reminds us of the meaning of the First Amendment of the Constitution. The framers of the Constitution placed freedom of conscience above other values and then moved on to freedom of expression-a free press, the right to assemble peaceably, and the right to petition government for the redress of grievances. His examination illustrates the balances struck by the Court between freedom of expression and opposing human values such as personal privacy, fair trials, and national security. He judges the Court's performance in defining basic freedoms: what has changed, how these rights are being expanded or circumscribed. Here is a brilliant book of commentary on our "first" rights under the Constitution and a call for an evolving and explicit law of the majority, when there are dissents. No one has written so forthrightly about these latest Court decisions of immense importance. No one is better qualified to tell us where we stand in our freedom of expression. Archibald Cox is Carl M. Loeb University Professor at Harvard.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:02:23 -0400)

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