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Tono-Bungay by H. G. Wells
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Tono-Bungay (1909)

by H. G. Wells

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 60 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
The one where the protaganist works in his uncle's chemist shop, helping create a market a cough syrup that makes his uncle rich. Then he loses everything. ( )
  lisahistory | Oct 3, 2017 |
Enjoyable writing style, some interesting (but now dated) philosophical points, no real payoff at the end for me. ( )
  bzbooks | Jan 4, 2017 |
I think this might be my favorite Wells so far. Beautifully written and less winging off into unexpected territory, though there is a brief trip to Africa. ( )
  laurenbufferd | Nov 14, 2016 |
Startlingly frank in places for an Edwardian novel. Enjoyable fictional biography about the business and personal life of George Pondevero. ( )
  brakketh | Nov 6, 2016 |
George Ponderevo is the son of a housekeeper for a wealthy English family. When he gets into a fight with a boy of a higher social class, he is sent away and ends up living with his uncle Edward, a chemist. Edward develops an elixir called Tono-Bungay that he markets as a cure-all even though it doesn’t really do any good. He takes George on as his partner although George is appalled by the lack of ethics in Edward’s creative marketing. As they make more and more money from dubious schemes, George spends less time with the business and more time with his real passion: developing a flying machine. Eventually, the whole scheme comes crashing down around them, and George is left to pick up the pieces of his life.

I’m not particularly a fan of Wells’ science fiction. I did like this better than his other novels, although I think his nonfiction is better than his fiction. There were a lot of themes to think about in the book: consumerism, faith, and social class, among others. Wells did a fairly good job of addressing these issues. I was bothered by the fact that as the narrator, George kept calling it a novel when he was supposedly writing about his own life. Overall, this was a decent read, but not a great one. ( )
1 vote AmandaL. | Jan 16, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
AN entertaining book with both a story and a moral, and not a dull page, is a rare achievement for an author nowadays. These results have been attained in the work before us, (Tono-Bungay. By H.G. Wells. New York: Duffield Co. $1.50. 460 pp.)
added by jlelliott | editThe New York Times (Jan 30, 1909)
 

» Add other authors (24 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
H. G. Wellsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Barrett, AndreaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Most people in this world seem to live "in character"; they have a beginning, a middle and an end, and the three are congruous one with another and true to the rules of their type. You can speak of them as being of this sort of people or that. They are, as theatrical people say, no more (and no less) than "character actors."
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From Amazon.com:

Presented as a miraculous cure-all, Tono-Bungay is in fact nothing other than a pleasant-tasting liquid with no positive effects. Nonetheless, when the young George Ponderevo is employed by his uncle Edward to help market this ineffective medicine, he finds his life overwhelmed by its sudden success. Soon the worthless substance is turned into a formidable fortune as society becomes convinced of the merits of Tono-Bungay through a combination of skilled advertising and public credulity.

-Includes a newly established text, a full biographical essay on Wells, a list of further reading, and detailed notes
-Edward Mendelson’s introduction explores the many ways in which Tono-Bungay satirizes the fictions and delusions that shape modern life.
About the Author
Edward Mendelson is a writer, critic, and professor of English at Columbia University. Patrick Parrinder has written on H. G. Wells, science fiction, and James Joyce.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0141441119, Paperback)

Presented as a miraculous cure-all, Tono-Bungay is in fact nothing other than a pleasant-tasting liquid with no positive effects. Nonetheless, when the young George Ponderevo is employed by his uncle Edward to help market this ineffective medicine, he finds his life overwhelmed by its sudden success. Soon the worthless substance is turned into a formidable fortune as society becomes convinced of the merits of Tono-Bungay through a combination of skilled advertising and public credulity.

-Includes a newly established text, a full biographical essay on Wells, a list of further reading, and detailed notes
-Edward Mendelson’s introduction explores the many ways in which Tono-Bungay satirizes the fictions and delusions that shape modern life

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:35 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Nonetheless, when the young George Ponderevo is employed by his Uncle Edward to help market this ineffective medicine, he finds his life overwhelmed by its sudden success. Soon, the worthless substance is turned into a formidable fortune, as society becomes convinced of the merits of Tono-Bungay through a combination of skilled advertising and public credulity. As the newly rich George discovers, however, there is far more to class in England than merely the possession of wealth.… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

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